Abstinence - Archive

Child Protection & Safety Act: Senate Sets Fines & Imprisonment for Misleading Children to Harmful Sites

On July 25, the U.S. Senate passed this, 65-yes, 34-no, 1-not voting (Roll Call 216).

However, when Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) moved to request a conference with the House on the House-passed H.R. 748, Sen. Richard Durbin (D-IL), the Assistant Minority Leader, objected.

The question of how to proceed remains to be resolved. Sen. Frist is quoted as saying that S. 403 eventually will go to conference.

He hopes the Democrats will relent, but if not, “he plans to push ahead to overcome all obstacles before the Senate recesses in early October for the fall elections” (CQToday, 7/27/06). Sen. Frist may file a cloture motion to overcome the objection.

Invoking cloture requires 60 votes.

[NCHLA, 28July06]

 

20 Years for Disguising Porn as Child-Friendly

Luring children to websites containing sexual content by using child-friendly words may soon be a felony, under new legislation approved by the U.S. Senate, reported CNET News.com.

The Child Protection and Safety Act would see fines and imprisonment for up to 20 years handed to anyone convicted of deliberately misleading children to view potentially harmful web pages.

“Whoever knowingly embeds words or digital images into the source code of a website with the intent to deceive a minor into viewing material harmful to minors on the Internet shall be fined under this title and imprisoned for not more than 20 years,” the legislation declares.

“This bill will protect children and save countless lives by dramatically improving our efforts against sex offenders and violent criminals,” said Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wisconsin, after the vote.

“Too many parents are devastated by an innocent child exploited and harmed by predators lurking in our communities.”

Webmasters, however, would have to clearly indicate an “intent to deceive” visitors who access the site before they would be subjected to charges under the legislation, a requirement that would leave the application of the law open to extensive judicial interpretation.

The legislation would also tighten laws relating to child pornography, sex offender registration and child exploitation. The Senate approved the bill by a voice vote.

The House, which voted to approve an earlier version of the bill, is expected to clear the revised version next week and send the legislation to President Bush for his signature.

The president endorsed the legislation Friday, saying it would provide “law enforcement officials with the tools they need to track those who prey upon children”.

See “Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006”: http://www.politechbot.com/docs/adam.walsh.child.protection.072106.pdf
[25July06, LifeSiteNews.com]