Studies – Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Epidemic: Modeling/Forecasts Based on Abortion & Other Risk Factors (JAPS, Fall 07)

The Breast Cancer Epidemic: Modeling and Forecasts Based on Abortion and Other Risk Factors Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Volume 12 Number 3 Fall 2007 http://www.jpands.org/vol12no3/carroll.pdf ABSTRACT Using national cancer registration data for female breast cancer incidence in eight European countries—England & Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, the Irish Republic, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Finland, and Denmark—for which there is also comprehensive data on abortion incidence, trends are examined and future trends predicted. Seven reproductive risk factors are considered as possible explanatory variables. Induced abortion is found to be the best predictor, and fertility is also a useful predictor. Forecasts are made using a linear regression model with these explanatory variables. Previous forecasts using the same model and incidence data for years through 1997 for England & Wales are compared with numbers of cancers observed in years from 1998–2004 in an Appendix. The forecast predicted 100.5% of the cancers observed in 2003, and 97.5% of those observed in 2004.   The Challenge of Abortion for Epidemiologists in Female Breast Cancer Research Trends It is difficult for epidemiologists to discover women’s abortion history. In any study the numbers of women who have had abortions may be under-reported. National data on abortions in most countries tends to be deficient, with abortions under-reported. Official abortion statistics in the United States and France are known to understate the numbers of legal induced abortions.The countries considered in this study are believed to have nearly complete official abortion counts. The long lag time for the development of breast cancer magnifies the problem. The average age of diagnosis is over 60, while most abortions and live...

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) Increases Cancer Risk

Women who take hormone replacement therapy are at a greater risk of developing ovarian cancer and dying from the disease, say scientists. Researchers at Oxford University concluded that 1,000 British women may have died from ovarian cancer since 1991 because they took the drug to relieve the unpleasant symptoms of menopause and prevent brittle bone disease. The new findings emerged from the Million Women Study, the largest examination of HRT and cancer, which questioned almost 950,000 women aged 50 to 64. Previous results from the same study showed that using combined HRT doubled a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer compared with not taking HRT. In the latest paper, published in The Lancet, scientists at Cancer Research UK’s Epidemiology Unit in Oxford found that the rate of ovarian cancer among those who took HRT was 2.6 per 1,000 women over five years. For women who did not take the drug, the incidence dropped to 2.2 per 1,000 over the same period. This meant that over a five-year period there was likely to be one additional case of ovarian cancer among 2,500 women receiving HRT, the team said. For every 3,300 women on HRT there was also likely to be one additional death from the disease. It thus has, since 1991, been responsible for some 1,300 additional ovarian cancers and 1,000 additional deaths. [20Apr07, Telegraph] The researchers said that a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer returned to a normal level within a few years of stopping HRT. Ovarian cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women in the UK with almost 7,000 new cases every year. The five-year...

Research: No Reason to Delay Pregnancy After Breast Cancer Therapy

Research from scientists in Australia questions the old adage that a woman who contracts breast cancer should wait at least two years before becoming pregnant. The study shows that, as is the case when a woman considers having an abortion, a pregnancy has a protective effect. Publishing their data in the most recent issue of the British Medical Journal, the researchers concluded that the usual recommendation to delay pregnancy for two years after the diagnosis of breast cancer is not valid. Although the basis for the two year wait recommendation for women with localized breast cancer who have completed therapy is unclear the scientists set out to validate the assumption. They examined 2539 women aged 15-44 in Western Australia who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1982 and 2000. They reported that 123 (5%) of these women subsequently became pregnant. Sixty-two (54%) of these women conceived in less than 2 years from the diagnosis of breast cancer. They ultimately found that pregnancy was associated with an improved survival. The five year overall survival was 92% and 10-year overall survival was 86%, and there were no major differences in outcome between early and late pregnancies. The researchers concluded that women who are not receiving chemotherapy can begin to conceive as early as six months after diagnosis without compromising outcomes or pregnancies. Other studies have shown that there are two breast cancer risks that are associated with an abortion. The first includes the loss of protection a full-term pregnancy afford women in terms of the beneficial effects it has on a woman’s breast. The second concerns the additional risk the abortion...

Peer-Reviewed Studies Demonstrating Abortion-Breast Cancer/Estrogen-Breast Cancer Links (1993, 2002)

Abortion Increases Cancer Risk   More studies also continue to suggest a strong link between Artificial Estrogens and Breast Cancer… consider these comments from 2002: “‘In 1960, when the pill was first invented, the incidence of breast cancer was one in 25 women; today it is one in eight women,’” says Kathy Raviele, MD, an Atlanta physician. A study published last fall in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) supports Raviele’s supposition that there is a definite link between pill use and breast cancer. And according to the Physician’s Desk Reference, women who took the pill as teenagers are at higher risk of developing breast cancer when in their 30s than women in the population as a whole. [FRC News, Jan/Feb 02] Open Forum IV: The Link Between Abortion and Breast Cancer – Panelists include Joel Brind,  Ph.D., Angela Lanfranchi, M.D., Serrin Foster, president of Feminists for Life, John Kindley, Esq. The video may be obtained from Right to Life of Vanderburgh County, 5001 Plaza East Blvd, Suite B, Evansville IN 47715; 812-474-3195. www.abortionbreastcancer.com www.abortioncancer.com       Reprinted from The Standard 4/6/93 Women who have had abortions have a greater risk of developing breast cancer, The Washington Times reported Friday, and because of the increase in breast cancer risk, women are 200 times more likely to die from aborting their first pregnancy than from carrying the fetus to term. Delaying childbirth until later in life also increases one's risk, studies show. Dr. Joel Brind, an endocrinologist and biologist now doing cancer research, was in Washington to bring his findings on breast cancer to the attention of...

Study: Chinese Breast Cancer Deaths Jump 40% since One Child Abortion Policy (2005)

Chinese state media has reported a sharp increase in the number of cases of breast cancer in China in the last ten years. According to official statistics from the Ministry of Health, about 40% more women are dying from breast cancer and the disease is striking women at younger ages than ever before. According to the officially released statistics reported in China Daily, the fatality rate of breast cancer rose 38.7 percent for women living in urban areas and 39.1 percent for rural women between 1991 and 2000. Xu Guangwei of the China Anti-Cancer Association put the increase down to stress and greater consumption of fatty food, which have been linked to cancer in many studies. A much easier explanation, however, is the communist country’s obsession with limiting its population with abortion. The link between abortion and instances of breast cancer is much better documented than that between stress and cancer. The Coalition on Abortion/Breast Cancer points out that an identical increase in breast cancer in US women was found between the mid-1980's and 1998, “the increase took place entirely within the Roe v. Wade generation – the group of women who were under age 40 in 1973 when abortion was legalized.” Karen Malec, the group’s spokesman said, “The Chinese government, like the American government, isn't telling women why they're getting more breast cancers.  Here's a little clue for the Chinese and U.S. governments. Nations that prohibit abortion (like Ireland and Poland) have significantly lower breast cancer rates.” The connection between abortion and breast cancer, though verifiable in many studies, has been assiduously blocked, says the Coalition, for years...

Research on Pregnant Women with Cancer

Amy Langford was utterly surprised when, at 42, she found out she was pregnant. Her joy dissipated a few weeks later, when she and her husband were told that a suspicious lump in her right breast was cancerous. “The doctor came back and said he had ‘not very good news,’ ” recalled Amy’s husband, Gregg. “His second words were, ‘Of course, this means you will have to terminate your pregnancy.’ ” But the Langfords, did some research and found a group of physicians who specialize in treating pregnant women with breast cancer at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in nearby Houston. Mrs. Langford underwent amniocentesis, followed by breast-conserving surgery and four courses of chemotherapy. On May 23, 2005, she delivered Bryan, a healthy 6-pound-12-ounce baby boy. Radiation treatment was done only after that. “I had no hair when he was born,” Mrs. Langford said, “but he had a head full of hair.” For many years, the consensus in much of the medical community has been that pregnant women with breast cancer cannot undergo treatment without harming their babies — and must make a dreadful choice. That assumption is being challenged by the results of a small observational clinical trial carried out at M. D. Anderson, which found that women with invasive breast cancer may undergo surgery and chemotherapy during pregnancy and still have healthy babies. Under the protocol studied, chemotherapy is postponed until after the first trimester of pregnancy and radiation until after the birth. “We can now say that the ethical dilemma has been eliminated,” said Dr. Richard Theriault, a professor of medicine in...

Having More Children Lowers the Risk from the Breast Cancer Gene

An international study has shown that having more than one child dramatically lowers the chance of developing cancer for women carrying breast cancer gene mutations. The International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study (IBCCS) examined the effect of pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding on women with cancer-causing mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, who have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. The study, reported in Medical News Today, found that while one pregnancy and birth had no effect on subsequent cancer development for those carrying the mutant genes, a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer was lowered substantially when she had more than one child. Breast cancer rates in women over age 40 dropped 14 per cent with every additional child born. The study also found a difference in cancer development based on the timing of a woman’s first child. Women carrying the BRCA2 mutation doubled their risk of developing cancer when they had their first child after age 20, compared to those who gave birth before age 20. For women carrying the BRCA1 mutation, the opposite was true: women who delayed the birth of their first child until after age 30 lowered their risk of developing breast cancer. Participants in the study all carried a breast cancer gene mutation. 853 had developed breast cancer. The IBCCS study was carried out by researchers in France, the U.K., the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and Canada. The German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), played a key role in the study. [Medical News Today, 31May06,Gudrun Schultz,...

Long-Term Hormone Replacement Therapy ‘Ups Cancer Risk’

Long-term use of estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy (HRT) does increase the risk of breast cancer, a major study suggests. The US study comes just weeks after research appeared to rule out any connection in the short to medium term. Oestrogen-only HRT is usually reserved for women who have had hysterectomies, as it increases womb cancer risk. The latest study, published in Archives of Internal Medicine, examined data on nearly 29,000 women. Research has suggested that HRT using a combination of the hormones oestrogen and progestogen may increase the risk of breast cancer. And some studies have also suggested a similar risk is associated with the oestrogen-only form. However, a study of more than 10,000 women by Stamford University published last month found no evidence of any increased risk in women who used the therapy for up to seven years. The latest study, by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, followed a group of female nurses who took part in a long-term study which began in 1976. Throughout the study period, 934 women developed invasive breast cancers. Of these 226 had never used hormones, and 708 had used oestrogen therapy. The longer a woman used oestrogen, the higher her risk of breast cancer appeared to be. Those who had been taking oestrogen for fewer than 10 years did not appear to have a higher risk than those who had never taken hormones. But those who had been taking the hormone for more than 20 years had a significantly increased risk. Henry Scowcroft, of the charity Cancer Research UK, said it was likely that that oestrogen-only HRT...

Chemical Pollution ‘Messing’ with Female Metabolic Processes: Commentary

[Comment: When will the pharmaceutical industry and their feminist sales force – left-wing women’s groups – stop messing with women’s bodies by pushing sales of steroidal hormones (used in menopausal therapy and oral contraceptives)? Drug companies are apparently searching for a way that women can continue using hormone replacement therapy, but there are health risks associated with the use of these drugs. Unpatentable products, on the other hand, do not have the same money-making potential as do patented products. Some natural products are alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. These non-estrogen products relieve menopausal symptoms and, unlike hormone replacement therapy, they aren’t associated with the risks of heart disease, stroke and breast and uterine cancers.    Karen Malec,  Coalition on Abortion/Breast Cancer]   ABORTION-BREAST CANCER NEWS HEADLINES “‘Safe Window’ Allegedly Found for Hormone Replacement Therapy” Four years ago, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a government-funded study, ended prematurely when researchers said they found that use of combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) – synthetic estrogens and progestin – raises risk of heart attacks, strokes and breast cancers. The WHI’s 2002 findings were widely publicized and women rushed to their doctors to find some alternative to HRT for the relief of menopausal symptoms. Different cancer risks are associated with the use of combined HRT and oral contraceptives (OCs) versus estrogen-only HRT and OCs. Doctors generally prescribe estrogen-only HRT to women with hysterectomies, but not to women who still have their wombs. Researchers learned in the 1970s that estrogen-only OCs increase the risk of uterine cancer. Progestins (progesterone-like hormones) were added to estrogen-only HRT and OCs because they did not increase uterine cancer risk....

Study Finds Miscarriage Does NOT Increase Women's Breast Cancer Risk (BJC,2002)

Women Who Delay First Pregnancy Into 30's Are At Increased Risk British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 723-727; DOI: 10.1038  www.bjcancer.com   Cancer Research UK  F. Clavel-Chapelon et al   Having a miscarriage does not increase a woman's risk of breast cancer at any age, according to one of the largest ever studies on the link between reproductive factors and the disease, published in the British Journal of Cancer.   The research confirms the writings of Dr. Joel Brind, a world expert on the link between abortion and breast cancer, who noted that miscarriage does not lead to breast cancer as abortion does. In the new study, researchers tracked women over a ten-year period, sending them detailed questionnaires and recording both reproductive factors and whether or not they developed breast cancer. Pre-menopausal and postmenopausal women were studied separately, in order to find out whether reproductive factors affected the two groups differently. Of the 91,000 women in the study, 1,718 were diagnosed with breast cancer over the time period. Previous research on miscarriage had produced conflicting results, with some smaller studies suggesting that it might increase the risk of the disease. But the new, large-scale research found no evidence that women with a history of miscarriage were at higher risk of breast cancer in either the pre-menopausal or postmenopausal group.   Dr. Joel Brind, President of the Breast Cancer Prevention Institute and Professor of human biology and endocrinology Baruch College, explained the reason for the increased risk of breast cancer with abortion and lack thereof with miscarriage in a 1997 paper entitled The Estrogen Connection. Dr. Brind wrote, "pregnancies destined to abort...

Study: Having More Children Protects Women From Cancer (4/05)

A study published in the medical journal Twin Research and Genetics has found that women who have children have a reduced risk of developing certain types of cancer, and that the risk is further reduced with each pregnancy. Researchers from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Australia studied medical data for more than 1.2 million Swedish women who had given birth between 1961 and 1996. Women who had more children had a lower risk of developing breast, uterine, ovarian, and colorectal cancers than women who had fewer children. The authors noted that it appeared that “an increase in the hormones produced during pregnancy are protecting against cancer,” but scientists have not figured out why. The study found that women who had children earlier in life had a lower rate of breast cancer than women who delayed pregnancy. Other studies have also found that pregnancy and childbirth offer women protection against certain cancers. The authors of the new study said that doctors should be aware of the cancer risks so they can provide more frequent cancer screening for women with fewer or no children. The study was initially designed to study cancer risks in women who had twins, since they are exposed to different hormone levels than women who have single pregnancies. While the researchers did find lower cancer rates among mothers of twins, it was not enough to be considered significant, they said. Neale RE, Darlington S, Murphy MF, Silcocks PB, Purdie DM, Talback M. The effects of twins, parity and age at first birth on cancer risk in Swedish women. Twin Res Hum Genet. 2005...

The ABC Link: abortionbreastcancer.com

It cannot be said that all women who have breast cancer have had abortions.  Similarly, not all women who have had abortions will get breast cancer.  Nevertheless, abortion is the most preventable risk factor for breast cancer. First Way Abortion Causes Breast Cancer Women have the right to know that 28 of 37 worldwide studies have independently linked induced abortion with breast cancer.  Thirteen of fifteen studies conducted on American women report increased risk.  Seventeen studies are statistically significant, sixteen of which found increased risk.  Most of the studies have been conducted by abortion supporters.  The first study was published in an English publication in 1957 and focused on Japanese women.  It showed a 2.6 relative risk or 160% increased risk of breast cancer among women who’d had an induced abortion.  [Segi et al. (1957) GANN 48 (Suppl.):1-63] These studies suggest that an induced abortion cause biological changes to occur in a woman’s breasts which make her more susceptible to breast cancer.  This is one of two ways in which abortion causes breast cancer.  The biological rationale for this phenomenon can be found on our ABC Summary page.  Delayed first full term pregnancy is a second way in which abortion causes this disease. Abortion is an “elective surgical procedure and a woman’s exposure to the hormones of early pregnancy — if it is interrupted — is so great, that just one interrupted pregnancy is enough to make a significant difference in her risk” [Professor Joel Brind, President, Breast Cancer Prevention Institute, Endeavour Forum Public Meeting, August 24, 1999, Malvern, Victoria, Australia]. Because American Women already face a high lifetime...

UNC Study: First Pregnancy Delivered v. Aborted (OGS 1/2003)

PROTECTION AGAINST FUTURE BREAST CANCER FIRST PREGNANCY DELIVERED vs FIRST PREGNANCY ABORTED A GAIL MODEL RISK ANALYSIS The protective effect  of an early first full term pregnancy against future development of breast cancer is has been undisputed  for 35 years. The landmark study establishing this protective effect [MacMahon, et al, (1970) Bulll WHO 43:209-221] is widely accepted in the medical world.   MacMahon, and group reanalyzed their 1970 data [Trichopolous D,  Hsieh C, MacMahon B, Lin T, et al,, Age at any Birth and Breast Cancer Risk, International J Cancer, 1983:31:70l-704], finding that each one year delay in the first full term pregnancy increased relative breast cancer risk by 3.5% (compounded).  Obviously, aborting a first pregnancy eliminates the protective effect against breast cancer. In an attempt to calculate the risk in numbers that both patient and physician can more readily relate to, Thorp applied the Gail model risk analysis to typical real-life situations (Thorp et al., Long Term Physical and Psychological Health Consequences of Induced Abortion: Review of the Evidence; Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, Vol 58, #1, Jan 2003, pp 75,76).  The following discussion, including table 8, 9, and 10, are excerpted directly from this reference.  “We think, given the undisputed protective effect of a full-term delivery early in one’s reproductive life on subsequent breast cancer development, that a young woman facing an unwanted or crisis pregnancy can and should be informed of the loss of that the loss of that protection that would derive from her decision to terminate her pregnancy and delay having a baby  (98, 101).  “To illustrate, Table 8 uses the Gail Equation to predict 5-year...

UNC Study: Protection Against Future Breast Cancer (OGS, 1/2003)

FIRST PREGNANCY DELIVERED vs FIRST PREGNANCY ABORTED A GAIL MODEL RISK ANALYSIS   The protective effect of an early first full term pregnancy against future development of breast cancer has been undisputed for 35 years. The landmark study establishing this protective effect [MacMahon, et al, (1970) Bulll WHO 43:209-221] is widely accepted in the medical world. MacMahon, and group reanalyzed their 1970 data [Trichopolous D,  Hsieh C, MacMahon B, Lin T, et al,, Age at any Birth and Breast Cancer Risk, International J Cancer, 1983:31:70l-704], finding that each one year delay in the first full term pregnancy increased relative breast cancer risk by 3.5% (compounded).  Obviously, aborting a first pregnancy eliminates the protective effect against breast cancer. In an attempt to calculate the risk in numbers that both patient and physician can more readily relate to, Thorp applied the Gail model risk analysis to typical real-life situations (Thorp et al., Long Term Physical and Psychological Health Consequences of Induced Abortion: Review of the Evidence; Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, Vol 58, #1, Jan 2003, pp 75,76).  The following discussion, including tables 8, 9, and 10, are excerpted directly from this reference.  "We think, given the undisputed protective effect of a full-term delivery early in one's reproductive life on subsequent breast cancer development, that a young woman facing an unwanted or crisis pregnancy can and should be informed that the loss of that protection would derive from her decision to terminate her pregnancy and delay having a baby  (98, 101).     To illustrate, Table 8 uses the Gail Equation to predict 5-year and lifetime risk of breast carcinoma for an 18 year-old woman...

Breast Cancer Risk from Abortion (Kahlenborn MD)

How Could Abortion Cause Breast Cancer?At the beginning of pregnancy there are great increases in certain hormone levels (e.g. estrogen, progesterone, and hCG) that support pregnancy. In response to these changes breast cells divide and mature into cells abel to produce mild. Abortion causes an abrupt fall in hormone levels, leaving the breast cells in an immature state. These immature cells can more easily become cancer cells. Has This Been Proven?Yes. As of 1/1999, 11 of 12 studies in the USA amd 25 of 31 studies worldwide, showed that women who experienced an induced abortion had an increased risk of breast cancer. In 1996, Joel Brind, PhD [1], assembled the results of all the studies up to that time. Brind concluded that women who have an abortion before their first fuul-term pregnancy have a 50% increased risk of developing breast cancer while those who have an abortion after their first full-term pregnancy have a 30% increased risk. What Does it Mean to Have “a 50% increase risk of developing breast cancer”?A 50% increased risk means a 50% higher risk than someone whould have otherwise. For example, if a person already had a 10% risk of developing breast cancer, the a 50% increase would bring the risk up to 15%. How Serious a Problem is Breast Cancer?Breast cancer is the worldwide leading cancer in women and is the most common cause of cancer death for U.S. women age 20-59. In the U.S. every year about 175,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 43,000 U.S. women die from this disease. This means that about 1 U.S. woman of...

Study Finds Having More Children Protects Women From Cancer (TRHG, 4/2005)

A study published in the medical journal Twin Research and Human Genetics has found that women who have children have a reduced risk of developing certain types of cancer, and that the risk is further reduced with each pregnancy. Researchers from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Australia studied medical data for more than 1.2 million Swedish women who had given birth between 1961 and 1996. Women who had more children had a lower risk of developing breast, uterine, ovarian, and colorectal cancers than women who had fewer children. The authors noted that it appeared that "an increase in the hormones produced during pregnancy are protecting against cancer," but scientists have not figured out why. The study found that women who had children earlier in life had a lower rate of breast cancer than women who delayed pregnancy. Other studies have also found that pregnancy and childbirth offer women protection against certain cancers. The authors of the new study said that doctors should be aware of the cancer risks so they can provide more frequent cancer screening for women with fewer or no children. The study was initially designed to study cancer risks in women who had twins, since they are exposed to different hormone levels than women who have single pregnancies. While the researchers did find lower cancer rates among mothers of twins, it was not enough to be considered significant, they said. Neale RE, Darlington S, Murphy MF, Silcocks PB, Purdie DM, Talback M. The effects of twins, parity and age at first birth on cancer risk in Swedish women. Twin Res Hum Genet. 2005 Apr;8(2):156-62....

Legal Implications of a Link Between Abortion and Breast Cancer (6/05)

Dozens of studies have shown that the greater the number of abortions, the higher the incidence of breast cancer.  Three states require physicians to disclose to patients seeking abortion that the procedure may increase the risk of breast cancer; 3 other states have more general disclosure requirements in connection with abortion.  There is a legal obligation of informed consent for any medical procedure.  With the majority of studies showing that abortion increases the breast cancer risk, and even the minority studies reinforcing the well-established principle that childbirth is protective against breast cancer, patients seeking abortion have an obvious right to this information.  The patient who received an abortion and later develops breast cancer may have a valid claim against the provider.  Already there has been at least one settlement in a lawsuit brought for such failure to disclose. Unfortunately, misinformation has circulated in the media by virtue of an article published last year in the Lancet medical journal.  That article did not deny that increased abortions result in greater incidence of breast cancer.  Rather, the article merely claimed that abortion does not increase the risk of breast cancer compared to someone who delayed pregnancy altogether.  The Lancet article and its published data are consistent with the prevailing medical view that the more abortions in a society, the greater the number of breast cancer cases. Failure to diagnose this higher incidence of breast cancer has now become the most common type of malpractice case.  While only a small percentage of physicians perform abortions in their practices, most physicians will encounter a patient who has an abortion in her medical history. ...

Protective Effect of First Full Term Pregnancy on Breast Cancer (review 2/05)

ACOG, along with the NCI,  agrees that a first full term pregnancy [FFTP] confers a “protective effect” against future development of breast cancer: Yet, [ACOG and NCI] continue to deny the impact of the sudden termination of that pregnancy:  “Long term risks, sometimes attributed to surgical abortion include potential effects on reproductive function, cancer incidence, and psychological sequelae. However, the medical literature, when carefully evaluated, clearly demonstrates no significant negative impact on any of these factors with surgical abortion.”  They are demonstrably wrong in all three categories. Consider the information below: Protection Against Future Breast Cancer First Pregnancy Delivered vs. First Pregnancy Aborted A Gail Model Risk Analysis The protective effect of an early first full term pregnancy [FFTP] against future development of breast cancer has been undisputed for 35 years. The landmark study establishing this protective effect [MacMahon, et al, (1970) Bulll WHO 43:209-221] is widely accepted in  the medical world.  MacMahon, and group reanalyzed their 1970 data [Trichopolous D, Hsieh C, MacMahon B, Lin T, et al,, Age at any Birth and Breast Cancer Risk, International J Cancer, 1983:31:70l-704], finding that each one year delay in the first full term pregnancy increased relative breast cancer risk by 3.5% (compounded).  Obviously, aborting a first pregnancy eliminates the protective effect against breast cancer. In an attempt to calculate the risk in numbers that both patient and physician can more readily relate to, Thorp applied the Gail model risk analysis to typical real-life situations (Thorp et al., Long Term Physical and Psychological Health Consequences of Induced Abortion: Review of the Evidence; Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, Vol 58, #1, Jan 2003, pp 75,76).  The following...

First-Pregnancy Factors Tied to Breast Cancer Risk (11/04)

New research provides more evidence that childbearing factors, especially those related to a first pregnancy, influence a woman’s risk of breast cancer. The latest findings are from a study comparing some 2,500 women who completed a first pregnancy and were subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer at least a year later, and 10,000 cancer-free mothers of single children. Extremely premature delivery was associated with a two-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer, investigators report in the International Journal of Cancer. “Extreme prematurity has been characterized by high maternal estrogen levels, which could increase breast cell proliferation,” they suggest. There was also a tendency toward increased breast cancer risk in women who had twins or triplets during their first pregnancies, and the association was stronger among women who delivered multiples after age 30. In contrast, preeclampsia was associated with a marked reduction in breast cancer risk among women who delivered their first child after their 30th birthday. “Our results suggest that certain perinatal factors are associated with maternal breast cancer risk,” Dr. Kim E. Innes of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver and Dr. Tim E. Byers of the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville conclude. “The pattern of these associations,” they add, “offers indirect support for a role of gestational hormones, and particularly gestational estrogens, in the etiology of breast cancer among young women.” [ International Journal of Cancer, November 1, 2004]. Comment: Although abortion supporters deny any link between abortion and breast cancer, this article brings up some interesting questions. For example, note these quotes from this item: 1. “Extremely premature delivery was associated with...