Studies – PreTerm Delivery / Premature Birth / Prematurity Complications

Premature Complications could include neuro-developmental disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, and Down Syndrome, bronchopulmonary distress and disease, failure to thrive, and many other conditions which can physically affect the child throughout life.
A 47-page, detailed summary chart of published studies of over one hundred peer-reviewed studies involving 34 countries stretching back from the present to 1972, noting an Abortion – Preterm delivery/Birth (APB) Link, can be found at Prevent Preterm preventpreterm.org.

Women Having Abortions Increase Premature Birth Risk 34% in Subsequent Pregnancies (2011)

Women Having Abortions Up Premature Birth Risk 34% Next Time [NOTE: Apparently, this study has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.] A new study conducted in the United Kingdom finds women who have abortions are 34 percent more likely to deliver a baby prematurely when they become pregnant the next time and to suffer from other pregnancy complications. Sohinee Bhattacharya, who led the research at the University of Aberdeen, examined more than 1 million pregnancies in Scotland over 26 years and found that women who have one abortion increase their risk of premature birth in a subsequent pregnancy 34 percent. Women who have a historic risk of giving birth prematurely up that risk another 73 percent when they have an abortion. The risk is increased enough, because of the abortion, that 10 percent of all women who have an abortion will give birth prematurely in their subsequent pregnancy that they carry to term, the researchers found. The results, first reported Tuesday in the London Times, show the risk of premature birth in a pregnancy following an abortion increases substantially when women have more than one abortion. For the hundreds of British women who have four abortions or more, 20 percent of all women seeing to give birth will deliver prematurely, and premature births lead to an increase in the risk of newborn children having physical or mental disabilities. According to the Times, the study also found that, when it comes to premature birth, surgical abortions are more troublesome for women than abortions using the dangerous RU 486 abortion drug (which has killed many women and injured...

Abortion & Increased Premature Birth: Care for Women with Prior Preterm Birth (AJOG, 8/2010)

Medical Journal Confirms Abortion Associated With Increased Premature Birth A new report in a prestigious medical journal confirms what previous studies have shown: abortion is associated with an increased risk of premature birth in subsequent pregnancies. Although the link is well-established, women are not normally informed of the risk when they are counseled at abortion centers. Dr. Jay Iams a professor and vice chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Ohio State University wrote a report on caring for women prior to pre-term birth in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Iams writes, "Contrary to common belief, population-based studies have found that elective pregnancy terminations in the first and second trimesters are associated with a very small but apparently real increase in the risk of subsequent spontaneous pre-term birth." As nurse Jill Stanek notes on her blog, the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists noted the article and responded to it. "We applaud his statement. Most high profile American writers won't breathe such a thing," the organization for pro-life OBGYN doctors said. "There are currently 114 studies in the literature all showing a statistically significant association between induced abortion and subsequent pre-term birth. And just about none to the contrary," AAPLOG said. It added that Dr. Iams writes "contrary to common belief" because "the association is systematically ignored or severely downplayed by the established authorities in our country. It is not mentioned under complications of induced abortion in any ACOG literature we know of. It is not generally taught. It is denied by default." AAPLOG says Iams, in his notes, references the 2009 BJOG Shaw...

Early Preterm Birth, Adverse Perinatal Outcomes in Women…History…Abortion (Clin Mtg ACOG, 5/10)

Canadian Study Finds Strong Link Between Abortion and Premature Birth A new study out of McGill University in Montreal has found a strong link between a past abortion and premature delivery in subsequent pregnancies. Dr. Ghislain Hardy and his team did a chart review of 17,916 women who delivered at Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill’s teaching hospital. Dr. Hardy’s team found that women with one past abortion were 45% more likely to give birth before 32 weeks, 71% more likely to do so at less than 28 weeks, and more than 50% more likely at less than 26 weeks. They noted that the link was even greater where the woman had more than one abortion. He presented the paper, entitled “Early Preterm Birth and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes in Women With a History of Induced Abortions,” at the 58th Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, held from May 15-19. “Preterm birth is a major concern in our health-care system today. It is the most important cause of neonatal morbidity,” Dr. Hardy explained in his presentation, according to the Canadian Health Network.  A study of the issue is important, he noted, because “an association between therapeutic abortion and prematurity has resurfaced in recent years.” The link between abortion and subsequent premature delivery has been confirmed by a growing body of independent studies on the issue.  Most significantly, in February 2009 a German team who evaluated over two million pregnancies between 1995 and 2000, found that the risk of very premature birth is increased by 30% after one abortion, and by 90% after more than one. Dr. Hardy...

Another Major Study Exposes Abortion as Linked to Physical Complications, In this Case, Cervical Damage and Preterm Birth

http://humupd.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/19/humupd.dmv041.full.pdf+html Title: Health Disparities in risk for cervical insufficiency Journal: Human Reproduction Advance Access doi:10.1093/humrep/deq177 Authors: Emmanuel A. Anum, Haywood L. Brown, & Jerome F. Strauss III URL: http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/deq177v1 ( click on ‘begin manual download’ ) Date: 19 July 2010 Excerpts from the Abstract: Results: Cervical insufficiency risk for Black women was more than twice that for their White counterparts [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.45 (2.22-2.71)]. Prior pregnancy termination showed a dose-response with cervical insufficiency. Compared to women with no history of prior pregnancy termination, primiparous women who had one pregnancy termination had an OR (95% CI) of 2.49 (2.23-2.77). The OR for two, three and four or more terminations were 4.66 (4.07-5.33), 8.07 (6.77-9.61) and 12.36 (10.19-15.00) respectively. Other predictors of cervical insufficiency included previous preterm birth, parity, marital status, renal disease, history of diabetes, polyhydramnios and anemia. Conclusions: There were significant racial/ethnic disparities with Black women having increased cervical insufficiency risk, independent of other studied factors. Prior pregnancy termination is also a major risk factor for cervical insufficiency. The White/Black disparity is evident in both primiparous and multiparous women. …………………………………………………………………………………………………. Pregnancy termination showed a strong association with cervical insufficiency, with the risk increasing as the number of previous pregnancy terminations increases. Compared with women with no history of prior pregnancy termination, primiparous women who have had one pregnancy termination: IAs                   1                 2                   3                   4+ O.R.              2.49            4.66             8.07               12.36 95% CI (2.23-2.77) (4.07-5.33) (6.77-9.61) (10.19-15.00) Introduction excerpts Surgical and medical treatments such as cervical biopsy, treatment for cervical cancer, routine dilation and curettage for diagnostic and...

Abortions Up Risk of Premature Birth in Subsequent Pregnancies (ESHRE, 6/09)

Having an abortion increases the risk of having a premature birth in a subsequent pregnancy — that is the conclusion of a European researcher at a medical conference. Several previous studies have shown that abortion hurts women and future children by upping the chance of premature delivery. Lead researcher Dr Robbert van Oppenraaij presented his findings before the collegium of scientists today at the annual European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Amsterdam. He says one induced abortion raisers the risk of premature birth in a next pregnancy by 20 percent. Two or more abortions raises the risk by 90 percent and doubles the risk of a very premature birth, at 34 weeks or less. "It can be concluded that a history of abortion is associated with an increased risk for premature delivery and very premature delivery," he said, according to a London Mirror newspaper report. Those numbers present a grave problem given that the repeat abortion rate in some nations, such as the United States and England — is 40 to 50 percent or more. That means millions of women and children around the globe are at risk of premature birth because of having an abortion. In February, another study confirmed the link between abortion and subsequent premature births when a woman is pregnant again. Dr. Manfred Voigt led the study, published in the German medical magazine Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol. According to the research, women who have one prior abortion boost their risk for a very premature birth in a future pregnancy by 30 percent. Women who have had more than one prior abortion increase their risk...

Meta-analysis: Abortion Causes Cervical Damage: Subsequent Preterm Birth, Low Birth Weight (BJOG,09)

Study Shows One Abortion Ups Premature Birth Risk for Women by 36 Percent A new study by a Canadian researcher finds that women who have just one abortion increase the risk of having a premature birth in a subsequent pregnancy by 36 percent. The research is the latest in a long string of studies confirming the link between abortion and premature birth. With premature births leading to an assortment of physical and mental health problems for unborn children, the researcher says women should be told of the risk before having an abortion. Dr. Prakesh Shah, a professor at the Department of Pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto is the main author of the new study, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. He found that women who have just one abortion in either the first or second trimester of pregnancy, when abortions are most routinely performed, have a 35 percent increased risk of having a low-birth-weight baby in the next pregnancy and a 36 percent increased risk of having a baby born prematurely. The risk substantially increases for the millions of women who have had more than one abortion and become pregnant. In those cases, women having multiple abortions have a 93 percent increased risk of subsequently having a premature baby and a 72 percent increased risk of having an underweight baby. Shah says that the reason for the post-abortion problems in future births is likely because the abortion can cause damage to the woman's cervix. The Canadian pediatrician and medical professor told the London Daily Mail that women need to be informed about these...

German Study Confirms Abortion Significantly Increases Premature Birth Risk (ZGN, 2/08)

Massive German Study Confirms Abortion Significantly Increases Premature Birth Risk A German study has further substantiated the link between abortion history and an increased risk of future premature births. Dr. Manfred Voigt and his German colleagues evaluated over two million pregnancies between 1995 and 2000, making the 2008 study the most massive AVP (Abortion Very Preterm Birth) study in the last 30 years.  (To view the abstract, go to: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18293256) The control group of women in the study had no history of induced abortion, miscarriage or stillbirths.  The rate of premature births in the control group was compared to that of three separate groups: women with abortions in their medical history (but no miscarriages or stillbirths), women with only miscarriages in their history, and women with only stillbirths in their history. According to a press release by the Reduce Preterm Risk Coalition, the study found that for a woman with one prior abortion, VPB (under 32-34 weeks' gestation) risk is boosted by 30%, while more than one prior abortion increases relative VPB risk by 90%.  The study's data about women's prior abortion history was extracted from a perinatal data-base, and not via interviews conducted for the purpose of the study.  Thus the Voigt team avoided the possibility of skewed results due to women falsifying their abortion history, a factor critics of the abortion-premature birth link have questioned in the past. Preterm birth raises a child's risk for cerebral palsy, mental retardation, epilepsy, visual impairment, hearing disability, gastrointestinal injury, respiratory distress, and severe infections.  Those born under 28 week's gestation have 129 times the risk of cerebral palsy as a...

LD, ADHD, & Low Birth Weight (CDC, 8/08)

PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT QuickStats: Percentage of Children Aged 6–17 Years with Learning Disability (LD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), by Birthweight* — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2004–2006† During 2004–2006, the prevalence of diagnosed LD, both with and without ADHD, was greater among children with low birthweight than among children without low birthweight. Approximately 8% of children with low birthweight had ever been diagnosed with LD without ADHD compared with approximately 5% of children without low birthweight. The prevalence of diagnosed ADHD without LD was not associated with a child's birthweight.   SOURCES: National Health Interview Survey, 2004–2006. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm. Pastor PN, Reuben CA. Diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning disability: United States, 2004–2006. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2008; 10(237). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_237.pdf. [CDC, MMWR Weekly, August 29, 2008 /...

Abortion Linked Prematurity Contributes to the Number of Infant Deaths (7/08)

ABORTION LINKED CONDITION CONTRIBUTES TO THE NUMBER OF INFANT DEATHS. According to new statistics released 30 July 08 from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), premature babies – babies born too soon and too small – accounted for a growing proportion of infant deaths. When linked with previous studies that have shown that abortion increases a woman's chance of having a baby prematurely, the conclusion is that women who have had abortions are more likely to bear children who die as infants or suffer from severe health issues. According to "Infant Mortality Statistics from the 2005 Period Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set," Vol. 57, No. 2, of the National Vital Statistics Report, low birth weight and preterm birth are leading causes of infant mortality and the rates of both have increased steadily since the mid-1980s. Babies who died of preterm-related causes accounted for 36.5 percent of infant deaths in 2005, up from 34.6 percent in 2000. More than a half million babies are born premature (less than 37 weeks gestation) each year and those who survive face the risk of life long health consequences, such as breathing and feeding problems, cerebral palsy, and learning problems. Mortality rates for infants born even a few weeks early, or "late preterm" (between 34 weeks of gestation) were three times those for full-term infants. The findings of the NCHS help identify abortion as a leading cause of infant mortality, with former studies having revealed that women who have had abortions in the past are much more likely to give birth prematurely. An article appearing in a 2007 Journal of Reproductive Medicine concluded...

Abortion Pre-Term Birth Studies, 2001-2008

PREGNANCY PRETERM BIRTH   Cost Consequences of Induced Abortion as an Attributable Risk for Preterm Birth and Impact on Informed Consent     J Reprod Med. 2007 Oct;52(10):929-37.Links Calhoun BC, Shadigian E, Rooney B.       Department of Obstetrics, West Virginia University, Charleston 25302, USA. [email protected]       OBJECTIVE: To investigate the human and monetary cost consequences of preterm delivery as related to induced abortion (IA), with its impact on informed consent and medical malpractice.   STUDY DESIGN: A review of the literature in English was performed to assess the effect of IA on preterm delivery rates from 24 to 31 6/7 weeks to assess the risk for preterm birth attributable to IA. After calculating preterm birth risk, the increased initial neonatal hospital costs and cerebral palsy (CP) risks related to IA were calculated.   RESULTS: IA increased the early preterm delivery rate by 31.5%, with a yearly increase in initial neonatal hospital costs related to IA of > $1.2 billion. The yearly human cost includes 22,917 excess early preterm births (EPB) (< 32 weeks) and 1096 excess CP cases in very-low-birth-weight newborns, <1500 g. CONCLUSION: IA contributes to significantly increased neonatal health costs by causing 31.5% of EPB. Providers of obstetric care and abortion should be aware of the risk of preterm birth attributable to induced abortion, with its significant increase in initial neonatal hospital costs and CP cases.       PMID: 17977168 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]     ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~         Termination of Pregnancy Among Very Preterm Births and its Impact on Very Preterm Mortality: Results from Ten European Population-Based Cohorts in the MOSAIC Study    ...

Reducing Abortions Would Significantly Cut Premature Birth Rate (2007)

[NOTE: This is not a study itself but a review of several studies and conclusions reached.]  Two researchers say reducing abortions in the United States would significantly cut the rate of premature births. They say the rate has increased as abortion has been legalized and point to Poland as an example of how banning or significantly reducing abortions would help pregnant women. Dr. Richard E. Behrman, representing the Institute of Medicine, has identified prior first-trimester induced abortion as an “immutable medical risk factor associated with pre-term birth.” In his book Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention, Behrman found that the premature birth rate in the U.S. was 12.5% in 2004 — 40 percent higher than the rate of 8.9% in 1980. Citing that data, researchers Brent Rooney, of Canada, and William Robert Johnston, of Texas, published in a letter in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, saying that prohibiting abortion would reverse the trend and also drive down medical costs. To back up their claim, they point to United Nations data showing Poland dramatically reduced its rates of premature birth, maternal mortality and infant mortality within a few years after its abortion rate declined by 98% between 1989 and 1993 (as a result of the passage of an abortion ban). "If induced abortion significantly elevates pre-term birth risk, one would expect Poland’s pre-term birth rate to slump 5–10 years after the induced-abortion rate plunge," they wrote. They say data from UNICEF found that, between 1995 and 1997 (after abortion declined by 98% from 1989 – 1993), Poland’s pre-term birth rate dropped by 41.8% and maternal mortality decreased 41.4%,...

Abortion and Premature Birth (JECH, 12/07)

STUDY LINKS ABORTION AND PREEMIES. Abortions increase the risk of low birth weight in future pregnancies by a factor of three, and of premature birth by a factor of two, according to the largest U.S. study of its kind. The study is hardly perfect; the data is more than 40 years old and doesn't distinguish between medical abortions and "spontaneous abortions," better known as miscarriages. Yet the report, published today in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (JECH), shows one of the strongest links yet between miscarriage or abortion on premature birth and low birth weight — major risk factors for infant death or sickness. What makes the report significant is the size and detail of data. Some previous, smaller studies on abortion and future birth weight have suffered because researchers were unable to untangle the effects of abortion from, say, the effects of being poor (which also happens to increase a woman's odds of having an abortion). But the researchers behind the JECH study, which evaluated just over 45,000 single-child live births from 1959 to 1966, were able to adjust for an impressive array of confounding variables, including race, age, weight, height, marital status, occupation, the number of prenatal visits, the number of previous children, smoking and drinking habits, drug habits, infant gender and both parents' education levels. That kind of rigor makes the new findings particularly important. The study not only found a link between abortion or miscarriage and low birth weight, but it also found that the risk appears to increase with every subsequent miscarriage or abortion. The accruing risk, says co-author Tilahun Adera at...

Previous Abortions Linked With Pre-Term Birth and Cerebral Palsy (JRM, 10/07)

31.5% of children born with very low birth weight due to prior induced abortions   An article appearing in 10/07 edition of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine concludes that nearly 32 per cent of “very preterm” U.S. births, that is, before 32 weeks gestation, are due to the mother having had a prior abortion. This information, combined with previous research in the relation between low birth weight children and cerebral palsy (CP), results in an estimated 1,096 children suffering from CP because of their mother’s prior abortion.   Dr. Calhoun et al. examined 2002 data (4,021,726 births, 486,629 preterm babies and 72,751 very-preterm babies) provided by Dr. Joyce Martin of the CDC (Centers for Disease Control).. The study's authors are Dr. Byron Calhoun an obstetrics and gynecology professor at Western Virginia University, Dr. Elizabeth Shadigian, obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan and Brent Rooney, the research director of RPRC (Reduce Preterm Risk Coalition, Vancouver, Canada)  They concluded that prior induced abortion is a significant risk factor in very pre-term births and cerebral palsy. The research backs up previous findings published in 2006 by Dr. Richard E. Behrman of Stanford University's Institute of Medicine, that named "prior first trimester induced abortion" as "immutable medical risk factor associated with preterm birth".  (Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention) Very pre-term babies have much higher than normal risks of suffering medical problems including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, autism, epilepsy, blindness, deafness, lung impairment and serious infections. In 2002 there were 58,717  U.S. newborn with a birth weight under 1,500 grams (3 pounds 5 ounces) according to a CDC (Center for Disease...

Study: Previous Abortions Linked With Pre-Term Birth and Cerebral Palsy (JRM, 10/07)

The study suggests 31.5% of children are born with very low birth weight due to prior induced abortions. An article appearing in this month’s edition of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine concludes that nearly 32 per cent of “very-preterm” U.S. births (before 32 weeks gestation) are due to the mother having had a prior abortion… 31.5% of children born with very low birth weight due to prior induced abortions An article appearing in this month’s edition of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine concludes that nearly 32 per cent of “very-preterm” U.S. births, that is, before 32 weeks gestation, are due to the mother having had a prior abortion. This information, combined with previous research in the relation between low birth weight children and cerebral palsy (CP), results in an estimated 1,096 children suffering from CP because of their mother’s prior abortion. The 2002 data examines 4,021,726 births, 4,021,726 preterm babies and 72,751 very-preterm babies. The study’s authors, with the Reduce Preterm Risk Coalition based in Vancouver, are Dr. Byron Calhoun an obstetrics and gynecology professor at Western Virginia University, Dr. Elizabeth Shadigian, obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan and Brent Rooney the research director. They concluded that prior induced abortion is a significant risk factor in very pre-term births and cerebral palsy. The research backs up previous findings published in 2006 by Dr. Richard E. Behrman of Stanford University’s Institute of Medicine, that named “prior first trimester induced abortion” as “immutable medical risk factor associated with preterm birth”. Very pre-term babies have much higher than normal risks of suffering medical problems including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, autism,...

Poor Training ‘Causes 1,000 Stillbirths a Year’

Up to 1,000 babies are dying needlessly every year because overworked midwives and doctors are not trained to spot danger signals, according to an expert on stillbirths. His warning came as confidential figures were disclosed which show that the health service faces nearly £4.5 billion in compensation claims over alleged blunders by doctors and midwives. A young boy is weighed after being born, poor training ’causes 1,000 stillbirths a year’ Prof Sabaratnam Arulkumaran said there was a direct connection between staffing levels and the risk for patients Professor Jason Gardosi, director of the Perinatal Institute, is to present the results of a 10-year study at a conference in Birmingham. It will show a link between stillbirths and foetal growth restriction, in which babies in the womb fail to reach their expected size. Around 40 per cent of stillbirths are growth-restricted, and it is estimated as many as 1,000 stillbirths a year could be avoided if medics spotted that the babies were smaller than normal and should, therefore, be delivered early. “Our research has shown the largest percentage of stillbirths were associated with the baby not having grown well within the womb,” said Prof Gardosi. “And it found that the majority of these stillbirths were potentially avoidable. “There is also an issue about resources, in terms of midwifery caseload and in terms of providing ultrasound to check for foetal growth for high-risk pregnancies.” His comments were echoed yesterday by Prof Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, the incoming president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, who warned that the numbers of consultants and midwives at up to half of hospitals “aren’t adequate”,...

Abortion – PreTerm Birth Connection (Europop 04, Epipage 05)

INDUCED ABORTION AS  A RISK FACTOR FOR SUBSEQUENT PRETERM BIRTH: TWO RECENT EUROPEAN STUDIES AFFIRM A CONNECTION A number of investigations into a possible association between induced abortion and subsequent preterm birth have occurred over the past 30 years.  Many of the early studies found no association.  Then, as larger studies with improving methodology were performed, there were some that began to find an increased risk of preterm birth following an induced abortion.  Arguments could be made that the methodology of some of these studies was less than desired, and that confounding factors could account for these findings–allowing those who didn’t want to believe there was an association to continue in their disbelief. But the studies finding an association continued to accumulate, and there were not many, if any, that were finding no association. In the last couple of years two important studies in this area have emerged that deserve attention.  The first, published in 2004, was a study that evaluated preterm birth and its relationship to prior induced abortion from the EUROPOP survey dataset, a case-control study from many countries across Europe.(1) This dataset was collected in 1994-1997 and has been used for a number of studies looking at factors associated with preterm birth.  For this particular study, data from ten different European countries was evaluated, including countries from Western, Northern and Eastern Europe. Among women who had one or more induced abortions there was a subsequent adjusted odds ratio of 1.5 for very preterm births (22-32 weeks EGA). They also found that the adjusted odds ratio increased to 1.8 when women with two or more prior abortions...

Preterm Birth Risk (Ancel-Papiernik, HR, 2004)

'ANCEL-PAPIERNIK' ABSTRACT ON PRETERM BIRTH RISK [78] [Dr. Emile Papiernik was the head of a national French program that reduced the preterm birth rate of France by 52% between 1972 and 1989.  There is no more respected preterm birth expert than Dr. Emile Papiernik]         The 'Ancel-Papiernik' abstract                 [8] History of induced abortion as a risk factor for preterm birth in European countries; results of the EUROPOP survey. Pierre-Yves Ancel, Nathalie Lelong, Emile Papiernik, Marie-Josephe Saurel-Cubizolles and Monique Kaminski. Human Reproduction 2004;19(3):734-740 Abstract: BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between history of induced abortion and preterm delivery in various parts of Europe, and according to the main cause of preterm birth. METHODS: We used data from a case-control survey, the EUROPOP study; 2938 preterm births and 4781 controls at term from ten European countries were included.  Based on national statistics, we distinguished three groups of countries with high, intermediate and low rates of induced abortion. RESULTS: Previous induced abortions were significantly associated with preterm delivery and the risk of preterm birth increased with the number of abortions.  Odds ratios did not differ significantly between the three groups of countries.  The extent of association with previous induced abortion varied according to the cause of preterm delivery. Previous induced abortions significantly increased the risk of preterm delivery after idiopathic preterm labour, preterm premature rupture of membranes and ante-partum haemorrhage, but not preterm delivery after maternal hypertension.  The strength of associated increased with decreasing gestational age at birth. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying subgroups of preterm births on the basis of the complications involved in delivery increases our understanding of the...

Induced Abortion and Premature Birth (Bibliography 1973-2000)

INDUCED ABORTION AND PREMATURE BIRTH, especially extreme (22-28 wk) premature birth.  "ACOG continues to deny there is credible literature validating this association (see 06 Compendium, see ACOG Brief on the Ayotte Supreme Court Case).  "And the March of Dimes, in their major initiative to find the causes of the preterm birth 'epidemic', fails to even mention the word 'abortion' in their poignant radio ads on the topic, or on their website entries discussing this major problem. "As a refresher, remember that the Australian data base of 250,000 births showed a 60% increase in extreme premature birth after one abortion (mostly suction curettage), and a 150% increase after 2 abortions, 460% increase after 3 abortions, and 800% increase after 4 or more abortions.  "Over 50 studies show such an association, with "dose relationship."  One would think ACOG and MOD would suggest looking into the association.  "Since the Australians and Europeans have, in fact, looked into it, and come up with a strong association, we can legitimately ask whether extreme prematurity (22-28 wk) is a problem worth our attention (and worth an informed consent discussion with the patient.) "The following is taken from a letter by Brent Rooney, Canadian medical literature researcher, found in European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 2001;96:239-240: In their excellent review of CP (Cerebral Palsy) history, Schifrin and Longo end with the words, 'We need to let the truth take us where it will.'(1)  "This letter assumes that there is the courage to do exactly that.  Although the etiology of CP has many uncertainties, preterm birth and incompetent cervix are considered to be risk factors.(2)...

Previous Induced Abortions and the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery: Epiphage Study (OGS, 10/05)

Previous Induced Abortions and the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery: Epiphage Study (OGS, 10/05)                                             Abstract of:     Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2005 Oct; 60(10):627-628.  Links Previous Induced Abortions and the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery:     Results of the EPIPHAGE Study.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16186764&query_hl=5  There is some concern about the effects of induced abortion on subsequent pregnancy outcomes, in part because abortion usually is induced early or about halfway through a woman’s reproductive life. Recent studies have shown an excessive risk of preterm delivery.  This study examined the risk of very preterm birth, at 22 to 32 weeks gestation, as related to previous induced abortion. A case-control study enrolled 1843 very preterm live-born singleton infants at less than 33 weeks gestation, 276 infants born at 33 to 34 weeks gestation (moderately premature), and 618 unmatched full-term control women who delivered at 39 to 40 weeks duration. Mothers of preterm infants were younger than those with full-term infants, had less education, and were likelier to be living alone, to be unemployed, and to smoke. A history of induced abortion correlated with an increased risk of very preterm birth (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.1). There was little change when controlling for maternal characteristics or without adjusting for a history of preterm deliveries. In addition, the association remained the same when women with previous preterm delivery were excluded.  The risk tended to increase with the number of previous induced abortions. The adjusted risk of preterm delivery associated with induced abortions tended to be highest for extremely preterm deliveries. The major complications leading to very preterm birth were premature rupture of membranes and idiopathic spontaneous preterm labor,...

Previous Induced Abortions and the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery: EPIPHAGE Study (OGS, 10/05)

Abstract of:  1: Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2005 Oct; 60(10):627-628. Links     Previous Induced Abortions and the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery:     Results of the EPIPHAGE Study. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16186764&query_hl=5  1: Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2005 Oct;60(10):627-628. Links <javascript:PopUpMenu2_Set(Menu16186764);>      Previous Induced Abortions and the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery:     Results of the EPIPHAGE Study.Moreau C, Kaminski M, Ancel PY, Bouyer J, Escande B, Thiriez G,   Boulot P, Fresson J, Arnaud C, Subtil D, Marpeau L, Roze JC,  Maillard F, Larroque B; EPIPAGE Group   <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Search&term=%22EPIPAGE+Group%22%5BCorporate+Author%5D>. Epidemiological Research Unit on Perinatal and Women’s Health, Villejuif, France; Department of Public Health-Epidemiology-Human Reproduction, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France; Department of Neonatology, Hautepierre Hospital, Strasbourg, France; Department of Neonatology, St. Jacques Hospital, Besancon, France; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Arnaud de Villeneuvee Hospital, Montpellier, France; Regional Maternity Hospital, Nancy, France; Epidemiology and Public Health Analysis, Toulouse, France; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Lille, France; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Rouen, France; and Department of Neonatology, Maternal and Paediatric Hospital, Nantes, France. There is some concern about the effects of induced abortion on subsequent pregnancy outcomes, in part because abortion usually is induced early or about halfway through a woman’s reproductive life. Recent studies have shown an excessive risk of preterm delivery.  This study examined the risk of very preterm birth, at 22 to 32 weeks gestation, as related to previous induced abortion. A case-control study enrolled 1843 very preterm live-born singleton infants at less than 33 weeks gestation, 276 infants born at 33 to 34 weeks gestation (moderately premature), and 618 unmatched full-term control women who delivered at 39 to 40 weeks duration....