Contraception – Adverse Effects: Cancer / Stroke / Abortion

Oral Contraception Linked to Prostate Deformities in Male Offspring (2005)

Oral contraception Linked to Prostate Deformities in Male Offspring Oestrogen [estrogen]-like chemicals commonly found in oral contraceptives and plastic packaging could deform the prostate gland of human embryos, suggests a new study in mice. Deformities to the prostate gland have been linked to prostate cancer and bladder disease in later life. The finding is significant because up to 3% of women taking oral contraceptive drugs become pregnant without their knowledge, and continue exposing the fetus to the contraceptive drug many months into pregnancy. This is because the risk of pregnancy becomes higher when the drug is not taken diligently, but many women do not realize this, says study author Frederick vom Saal of the University of Missouri in Columbia, US. Among the 60 million women using oral contraceptives in the US and Europe, the average number of missed pills is three per month, he says. This results in up to two million women taking the pill accidentally becoming pregnant each year. Environmental pollutant In order to test the effect of a typical oral contraceptive on the development of the embryo, vom Saal and his team gave pregnant mice the contraceptive ethinylestradiol. The dosage was scaled down to the mouse-equivalent of one-fifth of the normal human dose and was administered for five days. They also exposed a group of mice to low levels of a similar oestrogenic chemical, bisphenol A – a common environmental pollutant found in polycarbonate plastics and the lining of food cans. The researchers found a subsequent increase in the number and size of prostate ducts and a narrowing of the bladder neck in male mouse fetuses...

Woman's Beauty Peaks Monthly & Her Choice of Men is Cyclic

Women's Choice of Men Goes in Cycles Women are attracted to more masculine-looking men at the most fertile time of their menstrual cycle, psychologists have shown. During the less fertile times, they choose men with more feminine-looking faces. These are seen as kinder and more co-operative, but less strong and healthy genetically.   More masculine faces have squarer shapes, heavier, straighter eyebrows and thinner lips. The study was carried out by researchers in Scotland and Japan. They asked women to select the one face from a range that they were most attracted to as a partner for a short-term sexual relationship. They found that in the most fertile week of their menstrual cycle, women preferred more masculine faces. However, the choice of face did not vary for women using an oral contraceptive (i.e. not fertile) or those asked to choose the most attractive face for a long-term relationship. Smell of success The results are supported by previous research which showed that a male hormone smells unpleasant to women, except in the week of fertility. Also, the smells of more symmetrical, and therefore more attractive, men are preferred by women but again only in that week. Men who look more masculine have higher levels of male hormones and also show a better ability to fight off disease. This makes them attractive as potential mates because their children will inherit this useful characteristic. A controversial implication of the new research is that, in evolutionary terms, it is "natural" for a woman to be unfaithful in order to secure both the best genes and the best carer for her children. However, the...

Male pheromones and sexual attraction (NEL, 8/02)

Male Pheromones and Sexual Attraction  ABSTRACT Previous research has revealed that natural and synthetic pheromones can enhance ratings of opposite sex attractiveness. The present study investigated the effects of exposure to male axillary secretions on female ratings of the sexual attractiveness of male stimuli. Thirty-two female undergraduates, half of whom were contraceptive pill users, rated male vignette characters and photographs of male faces on aspects of attractiveness. On two separate study days, corresponding to different phases of their menstrual cycle, stimuli were presented while exposed to male axillary pheromones and under a control condition (no pheromone). The order of testing was balanced with respect to pheromone/control condition and menstrual cycle phase. Pheromone exposure resulted in significantly higher attractiveness ratings of vignette characters and faces. Use of the contraceptive pill or menstrual cycle phase had equivocal effects on some vignette items and neither had any influence on female ratings of male facial attractiveness. The results of this study suggest that exposure to natural male axillary pheromones can significantly enhance female perceptions of various aspects of male attractiveness. Introduction Pheromones are biologically-active substances released by an individual, and received by another individual of the same species, in whom they activate specific physiological or behavioural responses [1]. Pheromones are therefore referred to as ecto-hormones: chemical messengers that are transported outside the body that have the potential to evoke certain responses in a conspecific. The physiological and behavioural effects of pheromones have been well documented in many invertebrate and vertebrate species (for reviews see [2, 3]) though their putative effects on human behaviour and physiology remain equivocal. Scepticism concerning the existence of human...

Study of Woman's Scent / The Magic of Sexual Attraction

2 STUDIES  Scent of a Woman Study: Men Attracted to Women's Scent When She's Fertile By Melanie Axelrod   April 5 — Chanel says every woman has her own "Allure." But a new study suggests the female allure isn't bottled, rather, it comes naturally.Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, used already worn T-shirts to determine that men may be able to smell when women are at their most fertile, regardless of the perfumes and cosmetics they may wear. Devendra Singh, a psychology professor at the University of Texas in Austin, asked women to wear one T-shirt at night during the most fertile phase of their menstrual cycle (13-15 days after their previous period), then wear another T-shirt during the infertile phase of their cycle (days 21 to 22). Aside from acquiring two previously unworn cotton T-shirts, the women were also given unscented clothing detergent, soap, and shampoo to use for the duration of the study. They were asked not to wear perfume, and avoid products and foods that would emit a strong odor. They were also asked to refrain from sexual activity and to not share a bed with anyone, not even a pet, during the study. After use, Singh presented the T-shirts to a group of men and asked them to rate the smell of the worn garments. Out of the 21 pairs of T-shirts, the men could detect a more "pleasant" or "sexy" T-shirt in 15 pairs of them. That breaks down to 15 of the 42 shirts were considered pleasing, vs. the rest that were considered not pleasing, or not detectable. The results remained...

The Abortion-Contraception Connection: Comments from the Abortion Providers

ABORTION-CONTRACEPTION CONNECTION – ABORTION INDUSTRY COMMENTS Pro-abortion Alan Guttmacher Institute [research arm of Planned Parenthood] has repeatedly reported on major surveys that show 56%-58% of all women having abortions were using contraception the month they became pregnant. Alan Guttmacher Institute researcher Stanley K. Henshaw– “Contraceptive users appear to have been more motivated to prevent births than were nonusers” Alan Guttmacher Institute researcher Stan E. Weed-“[F]or every 1000 teens between 15-19 years of age enrolled in family planning clinics, we can expect between 50 to 120 more pregnancies” Infamous “sexologist” Alfred Kinsey, 1955- “At the risk of being repetitious, I would remind the group that we have found the highest frequency of induced abortions in the groups which, in general, most frequently uses contraception” Abortionist Judith Bury, 1981- “There is overwhelming evidence that, contrary to what you might expect, the provision of contraception leads to an increase in the abortion rate.” National Survey of Family Growth– Contraceptive failure rates show 7% for the pill, 16% for the condom, 22% for the diaphragm, and 30% for spermicide. Figures are even higher for unmarried people. Sociologist Lionel Tiger, 1999- “With effective contraception controlled by women, there are still more abortions than ever…[C]ontraception causes abortion” Abortionist Malcolm Potts, 1976- “As people turn to contraception, there will be a rise, not a fall, in the abortion rate”.    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ In a study of abortion patients in 1994-95 [Alan Guttmacher Inst.], 58% of patients reported that they ‘currently used’ contraception during the month of their last menstrual period… [CDC, MMWR, 7June02, "Abortion Surveillance – United States, 1998"] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  Two-thirds of unplanned pregnancies occur among women...

Study of Planned Parenthood Own Numbers Show 'Safe-Sex' Not so Safe

[not new, just underreported…] “Contraceptive Failure in the First Two Years of Use: Differences Across Socioeconomic Subgroups,” Nalini Ranjit, Akinrinola Bankole, Jacqueline E. Darroch and Susheela Singh. Family Planning Perspectives, Vol 33, No. 1. January/February 2001, pp. 19-27. http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3301901.pdf   “Contraceptive Failure Rates: New Estimates From the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth,” Haisahn Fu, Jacqueline E. Darroch, Taylor Haas, and Nalini Ranjit, Family Planning Perspectives, Vol 31, No. 2. March/April 1999, pp. 56-63. http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3105699.pdf   On Townhall.com today [9July07], Jennifer Roback Morse, author of Smart Sex: Finding True Love in a Hook-Up World, deftly and succinctly demonstrates how futile federally funded comprehensive sex education is for its target audience. The common number that is touted as evidence for the success of contraceptives is close to 90%. Ms. Roback Morse looks deeper and discovers that this number is more representative among married women in their 30's and 40's. Within this [married] group, only 3% of these women became pregnant while using the contraceptive pill. Nearly 50% however, of low-income co-habitating teenage girls become pregnant while using the contraceptive pill and over 70% become pregnant while using condoms. These are the numbers coming from the demographic the federal government is specifically targeting. The percentage of pregnancies that occur from abstinence is 0%. Despite this discrepancy in favor of abstinence, the federal government, Ms. Roback Morse states, spends $12 in contraceptive/condom education for every $1 in abstinence-only education. What is perhaps the most intriguing about this research is that the numbers come from Planned Parenthood. The very organization that aggressively advocates the use of contraceptives admits that their methods are at...

OCs Containing Cyproterone Increase Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis (10/01)

ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES CONTAINING CYPROTERONE INCREASE RISK OF DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS: four times more likely to develop deep vein thrombosis, or venous blood clots, than those taking OCs that contain levonorgestrel. Deep vein thrombosis can cause potentially fatal pulmonary embolism if blood clots travel through the bloodstream and lodge in the lungs. The retrospective case-control study of 24,401 women ages of 16-39, 1992-1999. Of the 26 cases and 144 controls, 14 cases and 114 controls had taken OCs with levonorgestrel, and 12 cases and 30 controls had taken OCs with cyproterone. The analysis also showed that duration of exposure did not affect risk of venous thromboembolism after cyproterone exposure (Lancet, 10/27). Cyproterone is found in "so-called third-generation" birth control pills, which contain more progestin than older versions, such as those that contain levonorgestrel [Research letter, 27Oct01, Vasilakis-Scaramozza/Jick, (Boston Univ School of Medicine) Lancet Reuters Health, 10/26; Kaiser Daily Reproductive Health Reports,...

Estrogen & Male Feminization (1999-2007)

Contracepting the Environment: Environmentalists Mum on Poisoned Streams When EPA-funded scientists at the University of Colorado studied fish in a pristine mountain stream known as Boulder Creek two years ago, they were shocked. Randomly netting 123 trout and other fish downstream from the city’s sewer plant, they found that 101 were female, 12 were male, and 10 were strange “intersex” fish with male and female features.   It’s “the first thing that I’ve seen as a scientist that really scared me,” said then 59-year-old University of Colorado biologist John Woodling, speaking to the Denver Post in 2005.   They studied the fish and decided the main culprits were estrogens and other steroid hormones from birth control pills and patches, excreted in urine into the city’s sewage system and then into the creek.   Woodling, University of Colorado physiology professor David Norris, and their EPA-study team were among the first scientists in the country to learn that a slurry of hormones, antibiotics, caffeine and steroids is coursing down the nation’s waterways, threatening fish and contaminating drinking water.   Since their findings, stories have been emerging everywhere.   Scientists in western Washington found that synthetic estrogen — a common ingredient in oral contraceptives — drastically reduces the fertility of male rainbow trout.  Doug Myers, wetlands and habitat specialist for Washington State’s Puget Sound Action Team, told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer that in frogs, river otters and fish, scientists are “finding the presence of female hormones making the male species less male.”   This summer, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the American Pharmacists Association will begin a major public awareness campaign...

Does Contraception REALLY Reduce the Need for Abortion?

Many columnists are endorsing legislation which calls for even greater contraceptive access and other measures to reduce the “need” for abortion (“Reducing the Need for Abortion and Supporting Parents Act,” H.R. 6067). The media generally promote artificial birth control with this type of comment: “To lower the abortion rate, we need more contraception”. One columnist recently illustrated his point with an analogy: “[D]enying that contraceptives reduce your risk of pregnancy is as crazy as denying that an umbrella reduces your risk of getting wet.” Well, if at the end of a school day you tell teenagers that the thunderstorm outside will soon pass, but they can try their luck with this stack of umbrellas, many will do so. But some of them will get soaked when their umbrellas break or slip from their hands in the wind, and all will get a little wet. The problem is that no one gets only “a little” pregnant.   The real problem is not the use of such rhetorical devices, however; it’s the failure to research the subject. These media sources continue to fall prey to the Great Contraceptive Fallacy: more contraception reduces unintended pregnancies and abortions.    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Consider these studies: In a study of abortion patients in 1994-95 [Alan Guttmacher Institute], 58% of patients reported that they ‘currently used’ contraception during the month of their last menstrual period… [CDC, MMWR, 7June02, "Abortion Surveillance – United States, 1998"] Two-thirds of unplanned pregnancies occur among women who described themselves as using birth control. Among the women who became pregnant unintentionally, 65% reported using contraception when they conceived. [May 2003, journal Human Reproduction,...

Oral Contraceptive Use as a Risk Factor for Premenopausal Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis (MCP, 2006)

http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com/Abstract.asp?AID=4166&Abst=Abstract&UID= Abstract Mayo Clin Proc. 2006;81:1290-1302 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research ORIGINAL ARTICLE Oral Contraceptive Use as a Risk Factor for Premenopausal Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis CHRIS KAHLENBORN, MD; FRANCESMARY MODUGNO, PHD, MPH; DOUGLAS M. POTTER, PHD; WALTER B. SEVERS, PHD OBJECTIVE: To perform a meta-analysis of case-control studies that addressed whether prior oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with premenopausal breast cancer.       METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE and PubMed databases and bibliography reviews to identify case-control studies of OCs and premenopausal breast cancer published in or after 1980. Search terms used included breast neoplasms, oral contraceptives, contraceptive agents, and case-control studies. Studies reported in all languages were included… RESULTS: Use of OCs was associated with an increased risk of premenopausal breast cancer in general (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.09-1.29) and across various patterns of OC use. Among studies that provided data on nulliparous and parous women separately, OC use was associated with breast cancer risk in both parous (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.20-1.40) and nulliparous (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.92-1.67) women. Longer duration of use did not substantially alter risk in nulliparous women (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.85-1.96). Among parous women, the association was stronger when OCs were used before first full-term pregnancy (FFTP) (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.28-1.62) than after FFTP (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26). The association between OC use and breast cancer risk was greatest for parous women who used OCs 4 or more years before FFTP (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.26-1.82). CONCLUSION: Use of OCs is associated with an increased risk of premenopausal breast cancer, especially with use before...

Sexual Activity, Condoms, Contraceptive Use, STDs: What We Know Now (update 08.09)

CONTRACEPTIVE USE   • Fifty-four percent of women who have abortions had used a contraceptive method (usually the condom or the pill) during the month they became pregnant. Among those women, 76% of pill users and 49% of condom users report having used their method inconsistently, while 13% of pill users and 14% of condom users report correct use.[Jones RK, Darroch JE and Henshaw SK, Contraceptive use among U.S. women having abortions in 2000–2001, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2002, 34(6):294–303; Alan Guttmacher Institute, July 2008, http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/fb_induced_abortion.html]     Can STDs/STIs be prevented? Yes, STIs can be prevented. Avoid all sexual activity if you are single or be faithful to one uninfected partner for life. This is the only way to avoid the risk of an infection.   Condoms There are also a number of ways to reduce the risk — but NOT eliminate the risk —  of infection. The fewer people you have sex with, the lower your risk of getting STIs. Correct and consistent condom use can also reduce (but not eliminate) your risk of getting most STIs. Consistent and Correct condom use (100%) during vaginal sex reduces your risk for: HIV by 85% [18-22]  Gonorrhea by about 50% [18,25-28] Chlamydia by about 50% [18,25-28] Herpes by about 50% [18,27-28] Syphilis by about 50% [16,18,25-27] HPV by 50% or less [18,22-24] Few studies have been done to see whether condoms reduce the risk of STIs, including HIV, during oral sex or anal sex.  Waiting to have sex until you are in a faithful, lifelong relationship (such as marriage) is the only certain way to avoid being...

Access to Contraceptives Does Not Stop Unplanned Pregnancies, Abortion Statistics (AGI) & Comments

A report form the Alan Guttmacher Institute provides wide ranging statistics and demographic information on women who had abortions. In addition to reporting that abortion numbers continued to drop in 2001 and 2002, the report contains findings that may bolster arguments made by social conservatives on several different issues, including one finding that would indicate contraceptive use may not stop unplanned pregnancies. The Alan Guttmacher Institute is the research arm of Planned Parenthood and openly supports abortion and widespread access to contraceptives. The report placed great emphasis on the fact that 48 percent of pregnancies in the US are unplanned. Of those unplanned pregnancies, 47 percent end in abortion, 40 percent are carried to full term and 13 percent end in miscarriage. Advocates of abortion often argue that to decrease abortions, unintended pregnancies must be reduced through increased access to contraceptives. But the Guttmacher Institute's research indicates that 53 percent of women who have unintended pregnancies used a contraceptive method during the month they got pregnant. The data also indicates that marriage plays a unique role as a protector of the unborn. According to the report, "Married women account for a lower proportion of abortions (17%), in part because they have low rates of unintended pregnancy," but even in cases of unintended pregnancies, married women "are more likely than unmarried women to continue the pregnancy." And cohabitation is not an adequate substitute for marriage. "About 25% of abortions occur among women living with a male partner to whom they are not married, although such women make up only about 10% of all women aged 15-44." The report also reveals...

World Health Org. Declares the Combined Oral Contraceptive to be a Recognized Carcinogen (9/05)

[12/02 — CLASS OF ESTROGENS LABELED CARCINOGENS – U.S. Upgrades Danger Posed by Element in Replacement Therapies, Contraceptives – All estrogens used in replacement therapies & contraceptives were listed by the federal gov’t as "known human carcinogens," a significant upgrading of the dangers they pose. However, government scientists said it is not known whether estrogens retain their cancer-causing potential when used in combination with other hormones, as they commonly are in hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives. Some estrogen compounds were previously listed by the National Inst of Environmental Health Sciences as likely to cause cancer in humans, but this listing of the entire class of steroidal estrogens was a broad expansion. "Based on our review of the literature, we have now put the entire class of steroidal estrogens in the category of greatest hazard," said Portier, director of the Environmental Toxicology Program for NIEHS. "For us, this is a big step." This summer, a large clinical trial of hormone replacement therapy in post-menopausal women by the Women's Health Initiative was halted early when it showed an increased incidence of breast cancer and heart disease. Many women stopped taking the medications — which had been widely prescribed to prevent hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause, and to protect women against heart disease & osteoporosis. Another part of the study that followed women on estrogen therapy alone — generally women who have had mastectomies — was allowed to continue because the risk of cancer was not higher than expected. Portier said the new federal listing of estrogens was not based on that study, but rather on a review of...

Advanced Provision of Emergency Contraception does Not Reduce Abortion Rates (C,4/04)

Contraception Volume 69, Issue 5 , May 2004, Pages 361-366 Anna Glasier , a, b, Karen Fairhurstc, Sally Wykec, Sue Zieblandd, Peter Seamanc, Jeremy Walkerc and Fatim Lakhaa AbstractA number of small studies have demonstrated increased use of emergency contraception (EC) when women have a supply available at home. It has been suggested that widespread use of EC could reduce abortion rates. We undertook a community intervention study designed to determine whether offering advanced supplies of EC to large numbers of women influenced abortion rates. All women aged between 16 and 29 years living in Lothian, Scotland, were offered, through health services, five courses of EC without cost to keep at home. Of a population of around 85,000 women in this age group, the study showed that an estimated 17,800 women took a supply of EC home and over 4500 of them gave at least one course to a friend. It was found that nearly half (45%) of women who had a supply used at least one course during the 28 months that the study lasted. In total, an estimated 8081 courses of EC were used. EC was used within 24 h after intercourse on 75% of occasions. Abortion rates in Lothian were compared with those from three other health board areas of Scotland. No effect on abortion rates was demonstrated with advanced provision of EC. The results of this study suggest that widespread distribution of advanced supplies of EC through health services may not be an effective way to reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancy in the UK.   1. IntroductionUnintended pregnancy is common and abortion rates are...

Primary Contraceptive Methods Among Women Aged 15-44 Years, USA, 2002

QuickStats: Primary Contraceptive Methods Among Women Aged 15–44 Years — United States, 2002    In 2002, the most frequent contraceptive method among women aged 15–44 years was oral contraception. Other leading methods were female sterilization and the male condom. A smaller, but significant, number of women were using the newer, long-acting hormonal methods, including injectables, implants, and the patch. Additional information is available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsfg.htm. [CDC. CDC MMWR Weekly, 18February05 / 54(06);152 Use of contraception and use of family planning services in the United States, 1982–2002. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad350.pdf] For a look at Natural methods of birth control, visit www.ccli.org, or these pages: The Effectiveness of the Creighton Model Ovulation Method in Avoiding and Achieving Pregnancy“Use Effectiveness of the Creighton Model Ovulation Method of Natural Family Planning”; Fehring, Richard J.; Lawrence, D.; and Philpot, D., Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing Vol. 23, No. 4 . May 1994. pp. 303-309 Click here Natural Family Planning Research...

Social Science Confirms Harmful Effects of Contraception (1/05)

These are the findings of Nobel Prize winning social scientist: Writing in the current issue of Touchstone Magazine, University of Virginia assistant professor of sociology W. Bradford Wilcox cites research by 6 scholars which shows contraception to be responsible for a significant rise in divorce and illegitimacy, both of which lead to other social ills like heightened rates of criminal behavior and increased high school drop out rates. Wilcox also argues that the poor are especially susceptible to the harms caused by the contraceptive culture. Wilcox notes that the research is not partisan: "The leading scholars who have tackled these topics are not Christians, and most of them are not political or social conservatives." Robert Michael, of the University of Chicago, believes that sudden widespread use of artificial contraception and the availability of abortion is responsible for "about half of the increase in divorce from 1965 to 1976." Wilcox cites George Akerlof, a Nobel prize-winning economist, who provides an economic explanation for why widespread use of artificial contraception resulted in an increase in illegitimacy rather than a decrease as many predicted.   According to Akerlof, traditional women who wanted to either abstain from sex or at least receive a promise from their boyfriend that he would marry her in the case of pregnancy could no longer compete with "modern" women who embraced contraception. This created an environment in which premarital sex became the norm and women "felt free or obligated to have sex." "Thus, many traditional women ended up having sex and having children out of wedlock, while many of the permissive women ended up having sex and contraception...

Majority of Unplanned Pregnancies Occur When Using Contraception / Aspects of Contraception (Ehmann)

In a study of abortion patients in 1994-95 [Alan Guttmacher Inst.], 58% of patients reported that they ‘currently used’ contraception during the month of their last menstrual period… In 1995… approximately 29% of sexually active U.S. women who used only [OCs] for birth control reported that they missed a birth-control pill one or more times during the 3 months before…approximately 33% of U.S. women who were using only coitus-dependent contraceptive methods during the 3 months before the interview used these methods inconsistently.” [CDC, MMWR, 7June02, “Abortion Surveillance – United States, 1998”] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  Two-thirds of unplanned pregnancies occur among women who described themselves as using birth control, according to a study published in the May 2003 issue of the journal Human Reproduction. Researchers from the Hospital de Bicetre in France surveyed 2,863 women ages 18 to 44; 1,034 of the women had had an abortion or an unintended pregnancy within the last five years and 1,829 of the women were randomly selected. Among the women who became pregnant unintentionally, 65 percent reported using contraception. Among those women, 21 percent reported using birth control pills, 9 percent reported using an intrauterine device, 12 percent reported using condoms, and 23 percent reported using some other method of contraception. However, 60 percent of the women who reported using birth control pills said they had missed one or more pills and 30 percent of IUD users said that device was in the wrong position or fell out. In addition, more than 50 percent of women who reported using condoms said that the condom tore or fell off during intercourse and 30 percent of regular...

New HIV-Condom Oversight Has Some Worried…Perhaps They Should Be (7/04)

The Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has proposed a new set of rules that will guard the content of HIV/AIDS education resources, and contraception educators and promiscuity promoters are worried. In essence, they are concerned that the ineffectiveness of condoms will be revealed.   Under the proposed guidelines, as published in the June 16 Federal Register, the CDC would demand that all HIV/AIDS prevention resources funded by the CDC must be approved by a review panel for “medically accurate information regarding the effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of condoms in preventing the sexually transmitted disease the materials are designed to address.” The truth that condoms do not offer complete protection against dangerous sexually transmitted diseases is not a message that large contraception-pushing “educators,” such as Planned Parenthood and Gay Men’s Health Crisis, like. Groups like GMHC have called the proposed guidelines equivalent to “moralizing.” By the same logic, it would be “moralizing” to put a warning label on cigarettes. The CDC is accepting public comment on the proposed guidelines until August 16, 2004. Final guidelines are expected to be issued four months after that. [Gay City News, 06/30/04; Jessemyn Pekari, National Abstinence Clearinghouse E-mail Update...

Birth Control Use Data for Teen and Young Adult Females, 1995

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, Vital and Health Statistics Division data for 1995:   15-19 year olds 20-24 year olds Condom 10.9% 16.7% Never had intercourse 49.8% 12.1% Of 9.7 million women using "coitis-dependent contraceptives"  [i.e. barrier birth control methods such as the condom] in the 3 months prior to the interview, about 33% — over 3 million — used them inconsistently. An even higher percentage of teens using these methods reported inconsistent use — 38%. The highest percentage of any group of women reporting inconsistent use was in the 20-24 year old group — almost 42%. 9% of sexually active teens under age 16 are using the pill; 33.6% of these teens use condoms. Nearly 30% of all women who had intercourse in the 3 months prior to the interview and used the pill as the only contraceptive method, reported missing a pill at least once during the cycle. [Table...

Research on Chemical Methods – The Pill

I. PILL USE TRIPLES CERVICAL CANCER RISK A study by the World Health Organization (WHO), published online (27Mar02) in the prestigious British medical journal, The Lancet, found that women who use the oral contraceptive pill for more than five years could triple their risk of developing cervical cancer. The study examined the history of 3,769 women in 8 countries who had HPV (Human Papilloma Virus), an STD (STI) present in about 99% of all cases of cervical cancer. Since most women who have HPV do not develop cervical cancer, scientists believe there must be co-factors involved. Researchers at the International Agency for Research on Cancer, an arm of WHO, pooled data in 8 control studies to compare 1,853 with HPV and cervical cancer with 1,916 with HPV but no cancer, and asked about their birth control practices. They found that women with HPV who take the pill for less than five years do not significantly increase their risk of developing cervical cancer. However, those who are on the pill for longer than five years are nearly three times as likely to develop the disease. Those who take it for more than 10 years quadruple their risk. Moreover, the increased danger persisted for more than 15 years, even if a woman stopped taking the pill. About one percent of women will develop cervical cancer. Long-term pill use raises the odds to three or four percent, according to the WHO findings.   About 13,000 American women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer this year, and it will kill about 4,100. Worldwide, approximately 200,000 women die of cervical cancer. It is the...