Human Development

3D Fetus Model: Company Creates Realistic Replicas From MRI Scans For Pregnant Women (8/2012)

3D Fetus Model: Company Creates Realistic Replicas From MRI Scans For Pregnant Women   Pregnant mothers eager to get their hands on the most-realistic rendering of their unborn child should look no further than the Parkside Hiroo Ladies Clinic in Tokyo, which is partnering with Japanese engineering company Fasotec, to produce a small, 3D replicas of fetuses. The "Shape of an Angel" model is created through a multi-step process that converts an MRI scan of the mother's womb, Geekosystem reports. Once the pelvic region is photographed, the image is then run through 3D imaging software and sent to a 3D printer. White resin is used for the fetus, and clear resin used for the mother's torso region.   The model measures 90 x 60 x 40 millimeters and seems to be packaged in a pink and white gift box. However, the model isn't for the budget-conscious, as it will set buyers back 100,000 yen (about $1,230), io9 reports.   Though it's unclear if this high-tech option will catch on with expectant mothers around the world, the model is only the latest in a series of pregnancy trends embraced in the past year. Gender reveal cupcakes were a particularly sweet addition to the list this year. Couples ask their doctor or ultrasound tech to put the baby's gender in a sealed envelope and then entrust the secret to a bakery. The first bite of the treat reveals whether the baby is a boy or girl.   There's also been an increase in so-called "Dad-chelor" parties, also known as "man-showers" or "daddymoons," which celebrate expectant fathers in the same way that...

2014 – 2012: Pregnancy / Nutrition / Miscarriage / Age & Fertility

 Find More Information Regarding Pregnancy, Human Development, and Breastfeeding, visit "PREGNANCY" in Left Menu…   NEW! What Science Tells Us About the Unborn Why Do Babies Laugh? New Research Sets Out Find the Cute and Adorable Answers New Smart-Phone "Appcessory" Allows Moms to Hear Unborn Child's Heartbeat Birth Rates for Females Aged 15–19 Years, by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2007 and 2012 Facinating Video Shows Conception to Birth Visualized Breathtaking Pictures Capture the Miracle of Birth, First Moments Outside Womb 3-D Plastic Models Let You See Face of Unborn Baby Before Birth The Developmental Milestones Reached by the Unborn Child at 20 Weeks Open-Womb Surgery Treats Unborn Baby’s Hydrocephalus The Fetal Brain and Fetal Pain: Congressional Testimony 3 Minute, 24 Seconds Video “Voyage” Depicts Amazing Development of Unborn Children Research: Unborn Babies Recognize, Process Speech at 29 Weeks Study: Babies Can Read Each Others’ Moods by Five Months of Age Unborn Babies Learn Amazing Things Like Taste and Scent in the Womb Babies In Womb Make Faces & Complex Expressions, Study Shows Fascinating Discovery Shows Unborn Baby’s Cells Go to Mom’s Brain Stunning New Process Creates 3-D Model of Your Unborn Child Amazing 4-D Ultrasound Captures Baby Yawning in the Womb What’s Behind the U.S. Fertility Drop? “Pretty Spectacular” Images of Fetal Development Available as iBook Infant Mortality Rate in Alabama Falls to an All-Time Low in 2011 Healthy Teeth Help Moms Get Pregnant, Fight Low Birth-Weight Deliveries Links to Zinc: Nutrition Expert Finds Tie Between Trace Mineral, Birth Weights Amazing BBC Video Shows Development of Human Face in the Womb Babies in Womb Pick...

Unborn Child 'Just a Parasite’? Cutting Edge Science Shows Fetal Cells Heal Mother's Life (Jan 2012)

Unborn Child 'Just a Parasite’? Cutting Edge Science Shows Fetal Cells Heal Mother's Life   A standard pro-abortion argument hinges on the premise that a baby inside his mom’s womb attacks her bodily integrity. The developing baby is seen in this light as an intruder, a parasite, a threat to the woman’s autonomy. From this perspective the pregnant woman is viewed as being occupied. The only way she can continue to exercise her interest in bodily integrity, the argument goes, is to be liberated through the termination and expulsion of the invader. But science paints a vastly different picture about the actual relationship between a baby in utero and his or her mother, showing that, far from being a parasite, the unborn child can help heal his mother for the rest of her life, as beneficial cells from the child pass into the mother’s body during pregnancy Far from being a parasite, the unborn child can help heal his mother for the rest of her life. Science writer Jena Pinctott explores this relationship in her October 2011 book “Do Chocolate Lovers Have Sweeter Babies?: The Surprising Science of Pregnancy.” Science has been studying the phenomena of fetal cell microchimerism for more than 30 years, after researchers at Stanford University were shocked in 1979 to discover a pregnant mother’s blood containing cells with Y sex chromosomes. Since women only have X chromosomes, they concluded that the cells must have entered into her body from the male baby she carried within her. Drawing on studies in biology, reproductive genetics, and epigenetics, Pincott outlined in her book what science has learned since...

Some of the Most Important Learning We Ever Do Happens in the Womb (Dec 2011)

Some of the Most Important Learning We Ever Do Happens in the Womb: Science Expert What is an unborn child capable of learning? According to scientific journalist Annie Murphy Paul, “some of the most important learning we ever do happens before we’re born, while we’re still in the womb.” In a recent discussion hosted by TED, Paul said the idea that much of a child’s personality is shaped in utero “is supported by the latest evidence from psychology and biology.” Paul explores the topic in her new book, Origins, written during her own pregnancy. During her research the former editor of Psychology Today and recipient of the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism discovered a field of scientific research that has only come of age in the last ten years – fetal origins. Fetal origins, she says, is based on the theory that “our health and well-being throughout our lives is crucially affected by the nine months we spend in the womb.” “We’re all learning about the world even before we enter it,” she said. “When we hold our babies for the first time we might imagine that they’re clean slates unmarked by life, when in fact they have already been shaped by us and by the particular world we live in.” Paul cites a wide range of studies showing that a baby begins to recognize his mother’s voice in the womb. Around the fourth month, babies hear others only as muted voices similar to that of Charlie Brown’s teacher, but learn to distinguish and prefer the mother’s voice. Babies learn the language spoken around them and mimic...

Late Preterm Delivery is STILL Premature — It's Worth the Weight to Wait!!

"Late Preterm" is Premature — It's Worth the Weight to Wait!! Give Your Baby the Best Chance for a Healthy Start 39 Week Initiative of Birth Outcomes Project   Fetal Brain Development and Growth — Lower functions mature first; the cerebral cortex is last to develop — The brain at 35 weeks weighs only 2/3 what it will weigh at term — The immature control of the late preterm brain can be evidenced by problems with periodic breathing, apnea, decreased HR variability, REM sleep difficulties, and feeding difficulties — Volume of the cerebellum at 34 weeks is only 55% of that at term — Cerebellar function is related to: fine motor control, coordination, motor sequencing, cognition and language, social function, and learning — Volume of the white matter increases 5-fold from 35-41 weeks — Cerebral cortex volume at 34 weeks is only 53% of the term volume — Cerebral cortex is the seat of higher order functions: cognition, perception, reason, motor control — The brain organizes during the late preterm period; there is tremendous development of synapses, axon growth, dendrites, and neurotransmitters in these final weeks          "Late Preterm" is Premature — It's Worth the Weight to Wait!! There is an association between Gestational Age at Delivery and Special Education Need — the earlier the delivery, the higher the need for Special Education … the later the delivery, the lower the need for Special Education [retrospective cohort study of 407,503 schoolchildren, 2010, United Kingdom] Morbidity (incidence of disease or rate of complications/adverse effects following a procedure): In Massachusetts, a 2008 study found that 22% of Late Preterm...

Healthy Babies are 'Worth the Weight': 39-Week Initiative (2011) updated 10/2011

Healthy Babies are 'Worth the Weight': 39-Week Initiative Component of the Birth Outcomes Project [Ed. Note: This project is gaining momentum and is well underway in several states including Wisconsin, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ohio, and Louisiana. At least one hospital in Alabama, Southeastern Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, has had significant success with this initiative in its first quarter of use in 2011.]   Louisiana becomes first state to target elective births before 39 weeks; 20 hospitals sign on to 39-Week Initiative  DHH Secretary joined by health care leaders to applaud hospitals' commitment to healthier moms and babies Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals Secretary Bruce D. Greenstein today gathered with the Louisiana Hospital Association (LHA), the Louisiana State Medical Society (LSMS), the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and other Louisiana health care leaders at Woman's Hospital to celebrate the 20 Louisiana hospitals that have demonstrated a commitment to healthier moms and babies through their participation in DHH's 39-Week Initiative. DHH introduced the 39-Week Initiative as a key component of the Birth Outcomes Project, which was established to combat Louisiana's historically poor birth outcomes. The 39-Week Initiative is a voluntary program in which hospitals agree to establish policies to end the practice of elective, non-medically necessary deliveries prior to 39 weeks gestation.  DHH officials have been meeting with the state's largest birthing hospitals to teach them about the 39-week Initiative, encouraging them to adopt the initiative and providing support for its adoption. "I was genuinely shocked to learn how many births were being done early that weren't medically necessary. Too many doctors and too many women...

Unborn Babies Can Differentiate Touch & Pain and Feel Anger & Joy (2014) in Womb (2011)

   Unborn Babies Feel Anger and Joy, Psychotherapist’s Study Says They are happy. They are angry. They are fearful. They like music. And already, they like sweet treats. In fact, babies in utero experience a wide range of sensory input at a much earlier stage of development than once believed. That’s the result of a study from Heidelberg psychotherapist Ludwig Janus, reported February 9 on kath.net, the on-line German-language newspaper. Dr. Janus’ research showed that the unborn child can already feel emotions, such as anger and joy. According to him, there is a close connection between mother and child, through which the developing fetus “is confronted with a whole range of feelings and sympathizes with them.” So the unborn baby could be angry in the womb or have fear, but also feel joy and satisfaction. By eight weeks, the fetus has developed a sense of touch. Ultrasound images show the fetus, for example, reaching to touch a strip along the umbilical cord to reach the uterine wall and grope its surroundings. The sense of taste can be tested as early as thirteen weeks. Janus reported that just as newborn infants like the taste of sweet fruit water, so does the developing fetus prefer sweeter tastes; and U.S. researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center (Philadelphia) demonstrated that the fetus will swallow more of the amniotic fluid if it is sweet, rather than bitter. At seventeen weeks, the developing child has a well-developed sense of hearing—experiencing first the mother’s heartbeat, the sound of her blood and the rumblings of the stomach and intestines, later the maternal voice, and then other...

In Decline, Stillbirths Continue to Devastate (8/11)

In Decline, Stillbirths Continue to Devastate Comment: Note this quote from this article: "It (stillbirth) often is a devastating experience. “As soon as they learn they are pregnant, most women consider their unborn baby their child, and for many a stillbirth is like the death of a child,” said Dr. Robert Goldenberg, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Drexel University College of Medicine." Really?? It's hard to understand how any ob-gyn doctor can be so callous to women suffering such a tragedy. Unfortunately, the truth is that pro-abortion mentality is not really pro-woman. Defending abortion throughout pregnancy and even during partial birth apparently demands the devaluing of any baby before birth. Logic and compassion even must be suspended in the service of promoting abortion as an unequivocal benefit for women.  [N Valko RN, 16 Aug 11] In Decline, Stillbirths Continue to Devastate I had been in active labor for 12 hours when my obstetrician said he would have to do a Caesarean because Twin A was stuck and neither twin could emerge naturally. Terrified of losing either baby, I responded, “I don’t care if I cough them up, just get them out alive!” Which, thankfully, he did — almost 42 years ago. Alas, not every woman has such an outcome. Even with the highly advanced technology now available to monitor the unborn, each year 27,000 fetuses that pass the 20th week of gestation and 13,000 that reach the 28th week or beyond are born dead. One in every 200 pregnant women who gets to 22 weeks of gestation will have a stillborn baby. It often is a devastating experience. “As soon as...

Cell Phone Use May Reduce Male Fertility (2011)

Men who have been diagnosed with poor sperm quality and who are trying to have children should limit their cell phone use, according to new findings. Researchers have found that while cell phone use appears to increase the level of testosterone circulating in the body, it may also lead to low sperm quality and a decrease in fertility. “Our findings were a little bit puzzling,” says Rany Shamloul, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and lead researcher on the project. “We were expecting to find different results, but the results we did find suggest that there could be some intriguing mechanisms at work.” The research team discovered that men who reported cell phone use had higher levels of circulating testosterone but they also had lower levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), an important reproductive hormone that is secreted by the pituitary gland in the brain. The researchers hypothesize that electromagnetic waves (EMW) emitted by cell phones may have a dual action on male hormone levels and fertility. EMW may increase the number of cells in the testes that produce testosterone; however, by lowering the levels of LH excreted by the pituitary gland, EMW may also block the conversion of this basic circulating type of testosterone to the more active, potent form of testosterone associated with sperm production and fertility. More in-depth research is needed to determine the exact ways in which EMW affects male fertility. [Jun 01, 2011,  LifeSiteNews staff, KINGSTON, ON,  ...

Study: One in Six Canadian Couples Will Have Trouble Conceiving Children (2011)

One in Six Canadian Couples Will Have Trouble Conceiving Children: Study Nearly half of Canadians are affected in some way, either personally or within family, by infertility, a new study has found. According to the online survey released yesterday by Conceivable Dreams, an Ontario organization dedicated to raising awareness about infertility in Canada, one in six Canadian couples are impacted by infertility. Conceivable Dreams claims that 15% of reproductive age couples in Ontario will need medical help to conceive…  Nearly half of Canadians are affected in some way, either personally or within family, by infertility, a new study has found. According to the online survey released yesterday by Conceivable Dreams, an Ontario organization dedicated to raising awareness about infertility in Canada, one in six Canadian couples are impacted by infertility. Conceivable Dreams claims that 15% of reproductive age couples in Ontario will need medical help to conceive. The organization says infertility not only dashes couples’ hopes of a family, but also leads to “depression, anxiety, stress, loss of self-esteem, health problems, sleep problems, sexual dysfunction, impaired quality of life, and reduced job performance.” “Children are Ontario’s most valuable future resource,” says the Conceivable Dreams website. However, according to the organization, the solution to the problem lies in increased access to and medical coverage for reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), a technologies that requires the creation, and then destruction of “excess” embryos while attempting to achieve pregnancy. “While many couples are hopeful to conceive, many families never realize their dreams of parenthood,” said Joanne Horibe, founding member of Conceivable Dreams, in a press release yesterday.  She believes...

Study Shows Newborn Babies Remember Music They Heard in the Womb (3/2011)

Study Shows Newborn Babies Remember Music They Heard in the Womb Scientists at Paris Descartes University have found that one-month-old babies remember music that was played to them in the third trimester of their mothers’ pregnancies. Developmental psychobiologist Carolyn Granier-Deferre and her colleagues at the Department of Cognitive Neuropsychology played a descending piano melody twice daily during the 35th, 36th, and 37th weeks of gestation to the unborn children of 25 women. Twenty-five other women at the same stage of pregnancy were used as controls. One month after birth, the descending melody and an ascending nine-note piano melody were played to both sets of babies while they were in quiet sleep, and the cardiac responses of the 25 exposed infants and 25 control infants were assessed. The researchers reported that all infants displayed a significant heart rate change when they were exposed to the music. However, the scientists observed that the heart rates of the 25 sleeping babies who had heard the notes before birth briefly slowed by about 12 beats a minute with the familiar descending melody. The unfamiliar ascending nine-note piano melody played to the exposed infants resulted in a heart rate decrease of only five or six beats per minute. The 25 control infants who had never heard either melody had the same five or six beats per minute heart rate decrease. “In exposed infants, the descending melody evoked a cardiac deceleration that was twice larger than the decelerations elicited by the ascending melody and by both melodies in control infants,” Dr. Granier-Deferre reported. The researchers concluded that three weeks of prenatal exposure to a specific...

FDA Requires Stronger Warning for Pregnancy Treatment Terbutaline (2011)

The FDA said terbutaline injections, which are used to help pregnant women avoid preterm labor, will carry a boxed warning. Injections should not be administered for longer than three days "because of the potential for serious maternal heart problems and death," the agency said. The FDA also advised clinicians not to prescribe the pill version for this indication because of similar risks. [18 Feb 2011, USA TODAY; PFLI PharmFacts E-News Update,...

Pregnancy Stats & Research (2009-2011)

Preterm Births, USA, 2007 Infant Deaths — United States, 2000–2007 Unborn Twins Interact With Each Other As Early as 14 Weeks Pulmonary Hypertension and Pregnancy…       Preterm Births, USA, 2007 Preterm infants (those born at <37 completed weeks of gestation) are less likely to survive to their first birthday than infants delivered at higher gestational ages, and those who do survive, especially those born at the earlier end of the preterm spectrum, are more likely to suffer long-term disabilities than infants born at term (1,2). During 1981–2006, the U.S. preterm birth rate increased >30%, from 9.4% to 12.8% of all live births (3). Although lower during 2007 and 2008, the U.S. preterm birth rate remains higher than any year during 1981–2002 (3,4). Substantial differences in preterm birth rates across racial/ethnic groups have long been noted (5). However, trends in preterm birth rates among the larger racial/ethnic groups often have differed, (3,6). During 1981–2006, rates rose steadily among births to non-Hispanic white mothers, increased modestly among births to Hispanics, and declined slightly for non-Hispanic black births (3). Declines were noted in preterm birth rates in 2007 and 2008 for each of these groups (3,4). To examine differences in the risk for preterm birth by race/ethnicity, CDC analyzed final 2007 birth certificate data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS). For 2007, a total 4,316,211 births were reported, of which 546,602 (12.7%) were preterm (3). For the purposes of this study, gestational age was defined as the interval between the date of the last normal menses and the date of birth; the preterm birth rate is the number of...

Infant Mortality Rates for Single Births, by Age Group of Mother — CDC, United States, 2006

QuickStats: Infant Mortality Rates* for Single Births, by Age Group of Mother — United States, 2006 The figure shows infant mortality rates for single births, by age group of mother in the United States in 2006. In 2006, infant mortality rates were highest for mothers in the youngest and oldest age groups. The infant mortality rate for single births to mothers aged <15 years was 16.7 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, approximately three times the rates for mothers aged 25-29 years (5.1), 30-34 years (4.5), and 35-39 years (5.2), the age groups at lowest risk. The infant mortality rate for single births to mothers aged ≥45 years was 11.46, approximately twice the rates for mothers in the three age groups at lowest risk. * Per 1,000 live births. In 2006, infant mortality rates were highest for mothers in the youngest and oldest age groups. The infant mortality rate for single births to mothers aged <15 years was 16.7 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, approximately three times the rates for mothers aged 25–29 years (5.1), 30–34 years (4.5), and 35–39 years (5.2), the age groups at lowest risk. The infant mortality rate for single births to mothers aged ≥45 years was 11.46, approximately twice the rate for mothers in the three age groups at lowest risk. Overall U.S. infant mortality is about 6.0/1000 live births. Sources: National Center for Health Statistics. Linked birth/infant death data set, 2006. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/linked.htm. Mathews TJ, MacDorman MF. Infant mortality statistics from the 2006 period linked birth/infant death data set. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2010;58(17). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr58/nvsr58_17.pdf Adobe PDF file. [November...

Inadequate Prenatal Care and Risk of Preterm Delivery Among Adolescents (AJOG, 2010)

Inadequate Prenatal Care and Risk of Preterm Delivery Among Adolescents: a Retrospective Study over 10 Years Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether inadequate prenatal care is associated with increased risk of preterm birth among adolescents. Study Design We selected a random sample of women under age 20 years with singleton pregnancies delivering in Washington State between 1995 and 2006. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between prenatal care adequacy (percent of expected visits attended, adjusted for gestational age) and preterm birth. Results Of 30,000 subjects, 27,107 (90%) had complete data. Women without prenatal care had more than 7-fold higher risk of preterm birth (n = 84 [24.1%]; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.4), compared with those attending 75-100% of recommended visits (n = 346 [3.9%]). Women with less than 25%, 25-49%, or 50-74% of expected prenatal visits were at significantly increased risk of preterm birth; risk decreased linearly as prenatal care increased (n = 60 [9.5%], 132 (5.9%], 288 [5%]; and aOR, 2.5, 1.5, and 1.3, respectively). Conclusion Inadequate prenatal care is strongly associated with preterm birth among adolescents. Debiec. Inadequate prenatal care and risk of preterm delivery in adolescents. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2010. a Adjusted odds ratio: adjusted for maternal age, ethnicity, marital status, smoking, and prior preterm birth. C.M.M. is supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Women's Reproductive Health Research Award. Cite this article as: Debiec KE, Paul KJ, Mitchell CM, et al. Inadequate prenatal care and risk of preterm delivery among adolescents: a retrospective study over 10 years. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2010;203:122.e1-6. American...

From Conception to Birth (2002)

www.msnbc.com/news/827201.asp ‘From Conception to Birth’ (Doubleday)  29Oct02  New technology gives a complete picture of a baby’s development All expectant parents are curious about what is really happening inside during pregnancy, but until recently clear images were nearly impossible to get. Now, new technology is giving us a stunning first time look at a baby’s development while in the womb. Medical images showing the fetus developing in four dimensions use new scientific data from human biology to illustrate the process of birth. The technology and the stunning images of the development of the human fetus are in the book, “From Conception to Birth,” by Alexander Tsiaras and Barry Werth. Read an excerpt below. THE DRAMA OF LIFE UNFOLDING   What’s happening with the baby now? When our grandparents and even our parents asked this question, the answer was locked in mystery, like the night sky. They knew that as a child grows and develops inside its mother’s uterus, a new life unfolds. But they never anticipated they might someday observe this inner cosmos.   Even if your mother and father had a rough idea about the stages of embryonic development from biology class or brochures in her obstetrician’s office, they couldn’t visualize the wondrous activities stirring within her as she became pregnant.   A clear view from inside the womb   October 29, 2002 — New imaging technology helps give a complete picture of a baby’s development. Author Alexander Tsiaras shows “Today’s” Anne Curry stunning new pictures from inside the womb, found in his new book “From Conception to Birth: A Life   That all started to change in the...

Folate Levels in Pregnancy Tied to ADHD in Offspring: Prenatal Nutrition Important (JCPP, Oct 09)

Folate Levels in Pregnancy Tied to ADHD in Offspring: Prenatal nutrition seems to affect child's nervous system, brain growth, researchers say  Low folate levels during pregnancy are associated with higher odds for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in offspring aged 7 to 9, new research has found. The findings seem to support the long-held belief that folate (folic acid) levels in expectant mothers influence their children's nervous system development. The researchers also found that children of mothers with low folate levels had notably smaller head circumference at birth, which may indicate a slower rate of prenatal brain growth. The study was released online Oct. 28 in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. "Our findings further support the hypothesis that maternal nutrition contributes to an individual's development, with potential consequences for their behavior later in life," study author Wolff Schlotz said in a news release from the journal's publisher. The results are special cause for concern in relation to low-income families, where a mother's nutritional health receives a low priority, and women are less likely to take folic acid supplements prior to becoming pregnant. 28Oct09, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, news release; Medline Plus, HealthDay News; Robert Preidt, 3November 2009,...

Groundbreaking In-the-Womb Photos Now Improved and Republished (10/09)

Photos considered essential to pro-life movement's history and success A picture may be worth a thousand words, but for more than fifty years Lennart Nilsson has taken photographs that the pro-life movement has found priceless: the earliest and most compelling visual images that give intimate detail and clarity to the humanity of unborn children in the womb. The Swedish photographer is eighty-seven years old, and was the first to open up the secret world of the unborn – from conception up to birth – by way of macro-lenses and endoscopes (tiny instruments – including camera lens and case – that measure less than eight-tenths of a millimeter in diameter). Nilsson's photographic explorations of the unborn child's life in the womb were revealed to the world first in 1965 as the cover-story for the April 30, 1965 edition of LIFE magazine, entitled "The Drama of Life before Birth." But his photographs made their chief debut in that same year in a book called, "A Child is Born." The stunning images published in 1965 have now been remastered with the help of the latest photographic technology and "A Child is Born" has been republished in a fifth and final edition. Nilsson says this final edition of his book is meant for the reader of the 21st century to enjoy, so that they might appreciate the mystery of a human being's beginnings. Nilsson has cut away most of the scientific text of previous versions, and largely lets the photos speak for themselves. In a question-and-answer session with fellow Swedish photographer Hasse Persson, Nilsson remarked that although he has not photographed God directly...

‘In the Womb’: Amazing 4-D Footage of Unborn Baby (8/09)

The two-hour National Geographic documentary ‘In the Womb’ is now available on YouTube in 9 parts.  Originally aired in 2005, the documentary used revolutionary techniques in computer imaging and 4-D ultrasounds to present stunning images of the developing embryo, taking viewers through the amazing journey of the unborn baby from conception to birth. The video presents a remarkable visual apologetic for the pro-life message that human life begins with fertilization. Showing the continuous development of the unborn child from conception to birth, it shatters all attempts to pinpoint any other time as the beginning of life.  While portraying images of the sperm and egg coming together, the narrator explains, “Once within the egg wall, the sperm’s nucleus is drawn toward the egg’s. The two cells gradually and gracefully become one. “This is the moment of conception,” he declares, “when an individual’s unique set of DNA is created, a human’s signature that never existed before, and will never be repeated.” The narrator goes on to explain how all of the characteristics of the human body are laid out in the first weeks of life. “Over the course of the first trimester, or first three months, this single egg will begin to transform itself into a fully-formed baby,” he says.  “But all the features of the human body, limbs, nerves, organs, muscles will be mapped out in the fragile first weeks.” Through vivid computer-generated images, we are shown how at 4 weeks the black dots that will become the baby’s eyes have already formed, as well as the “emerging buds” along her body that will grow into her limbs.  By six...

Pregnancy & Human Development (update 12/2011)

Fetal Cells Cross Placenta, Stay With Pregnant Mom for Life / Mothers Retain Fetal Cells with Healing Properties Sharing a Smile Can Synchronize Mom’s and Baby’s Heartbeart: Study Study Reveals How Pregnancy May Help Fight Heart Disease Unborn Children Heal Themselves in First Days of Life New Technology Allows Parents to Hold Life-Size Model of Their Unborn Child Paxil and Pregnancy (possible adverse effect link) Unborn Child's Memory Develops by 30 Weeks in the Womb: New Research…   Fetal Cells Cross Placenta, Stay With Pregnant Mom for Life “You will always be a part of me,” might be a mother’s teary farewell when her child goes off to college, but research is showing it’s quite literally true. Kathy Ostrowski reports in the Kansans for Life blog on a recent National Public Radio Morning Edition program featuring Science editor Robert Krulwich and his explosive report about “fetomaternal microchimerism.” According to Krulwich there is increasing evidence that “when a woman has a baby, she gets not just a son or daughter, [but] an army of protective cells – gifts from her children that will stay inside her and defend her for the rest of her life.” Some interesting points and quotes from the segment:     “In a teaspoon of an ordinary pregnant woman’s blood… [are] dozens, perhaps even hundreds of cells… from the baby,” according to a Tufts University researcher. Lab studies done “over and over and over and over” of mother mice with diseases (ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancers) show that fetal cells rush to the places where they’re needed in the mom.     “The cells of an unborn child...