Hard Cases – Incest / Rape / Congenital Anomalies / Life of Mother

Cystic Hygroma

British Mother Gives Birth to a Healthy Baby Doctors had told her to abort. A British mother has given birth to a baby who doctors said would die in the womb or be severely disabled after birth. Physicians told Deborah G., a 36 year-old woman, that she should have an abortion of her unborn child. But baby Elijah has surprised doctors after a large, potentially fatal cyst called a cystic hygroma appeared and four weeks after medical scans confirmed their fears that it was growing. Instead of taking her baby’s life, Gudgeon said she turned to prayer. Thirteen weeks into the pregnancy, doctors told Deborah that Elijah had only a 75 to 90 percent chance of surviving and that, if he lived, the cysts normally cause brain damage or other physical disabilities. After the initial diagnosis, a second scan two weeks later showed the condition worsening for her child, who would be her fifth. "My family was devastated when I was told what was wrong,” she told the British media. "I researched all the abnormalities suggested and tried to assess if we could live with a child so afflicted, and how it would affect the lives of our other children. I cried constantly and my only peace was when I prayed. I was afraid and confused. But somehow Elijah hung on.” The mother said that when physicians suggested abortion, they told her that most mothers in similar circumstances decided to end their children’s lives. Elijah was born four months ago with a small flap of skin on the back of his neck, but it is reducing as he grows. "I...

Adopted "Crack Baby" Earns Law Degree at Age 25

Mom's pride: 25 years after his bleak beginning, adopted crack baby earns law degree   Parents' love proves ultimate cure The kid came into this world with two strikes against him. Then he hit a home run. Ila Pawley became his mom.   "I got lucky. So lucky," D.D. Pawley said Friday as he slipped on his cap and gown. "If it wasn't for her love and all the sacrifices she made for me, I wouldn't be standing here today."   A young man with a bright future, getting his law degree from the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University and starting his career in a few weeks as a deputy district attorney in Sacramento.   Not bad for a kid who came into this world 25 years ago as a drug-addicted, African-American baby found abandoned outside a Los Angeles hospital.   D.D. – Dale David – was 3 days old and weighed just 4 pounds when LosAngeles County adoption workers called the Pawleys and asked the middle-aged white couple living in Arleta if they had room for one more.   They had already adopted and raised three children of mixed races, in addition to three children of their own. But, sure, they had room for one more, Ila Pawley told the county.   This one would be the toughest, the doctors warned her.   Because of the drugs in his system at birth, he would be slow. His motor-control skills would be poor, and he would be mentally delayed.    Pawley smiled and told the doctors to let her worry about that.   She...

Trisomy 18

  "Every child . . . no matter how fragile their life or brief their days, forever changes our world." ~Victoria Miller, Founder, Trisomy 18 Foundation     99 Balloons Touches Tens of Thousands Parents of Eliot, a Trisomy 18 child, celebrated every moment of what they knew would be a brief lifespan. In an age when abortion on demand is the norm, and when doctors routinely advise pregnant mothers to abort children found to have genetic abnormalities, parents who choose to give birth to handicapped children are becoming less common. These days it takes a special type of courage to ignore the advice of physicians, friends, and public sentiment, and to embrace the sacrifices that come with bringing a seriously handicapped child into the world. Eliot Mooney was one such child. Despite being diagnosed 30 weeks into pregnancy with the typically fatal condition Trisomy 18, Eliot’s parents chose to bring the pregnancy to term. Their son defied statistical probability by surviving the pregnancy. Eliot Mooney was born with an undeveloped lung, a heart with a hole in it and DNA that placed faulty information into each and every cell of his body. He would live for only 99 days. As Eliot’s father says, however, the short length of his son’s life “could not stop the living God from proclaiming Himself through this boy who never uttered a word.”   Knowing that Eliot’s chances of long-term survival were almost nil, on each of the 99 days of his life Eliot’s parents, Matt and Ginny Mooney, celebrated their son’s birthday, noting significant developments in Eliot’s life. After their son’s death,...

Trisomy 13

See also http://livingwithtrisomy13.org/MemoriesofJerimiah.htm  Trisomy 13: WHEN WHAT SEEMS BROKEN IS PERFECT The graph is still taped to the inside of my kitchen cupboard, pencil on a string dangling down beside it. It depicts the progression of my newborn daughter’s weight, most days showing a moderate increase and thus reflects a thriving child. It ends abruptly at 80 days.   How can the value and purpose of a life be determined? Can these be measured by longevity, intelligence or the productive contribution of an individual to the economic base of society? Even more important, who has the right or ability to make this judgment?   My husband and I were recently faced with a very difficult situation. We are in our 40’s, educated and financially stable. We have 5 children at home and we love sports and travel. The kids do well at school, are athletic, and all are healthy as horses. Life was good to us. We were pleasantly surprised when we discovered that we were expecting a new life to love and nurture.   We first heard of our unborn daughter’s genetic condition long before she was diagnosed. It was considered a lethal condition, an extra 13th chromosome. Most babies don’t make it to birth and those that do live a few years and are severely disabled. I thought, “Well, what is the point of that life?”   When the geneticist uttered the dreaded words, “your daughter has trisomy 13” and it was a diagnosis about my baby and not someone else’s, the reality was entirely different. With the ferocity of a lioness, I wanted to love and...

Down Syndrome: Facts, Stats, Concern of Eugenics

 International Down Syndrome Coalition for Life. http://idscforlife.wordpress.com/    Down Syndrome   Described in 1866 by John Langdon Down, an English physician. Jerome Lejeune, the French "Father of Fetology", identified the actual chromosomal variation. Down Syndrome occurs in about 1 of every 733 live births. Nearly 80% of these Down variations occur in women younger than 35, and can affect people of all ages, races and economic levels. It isn't anything a mother does that causes her child to have Down Syndrome. [C.Bell, 1/07, GCH letter] The way the risk of Down’s Syndrome is described makes a big difference in how it is perceived.  For example, a woman who is 30 years old has only a .1% chance of having a baby with Down’s.  This means she has a 99.9% chance of having a baby WITHOUT Down’s.  A woman who is 35 has a .4% chance of having a baby with Down’s…a 99.6% chance of having a baby WITHOUT.  A woman who is 40 has a .9% chance of having a baby with Down’s…a 99.1% chance of having a baby WITHOUT. A woman who is 45 has only a 2% chance of having a baby with Down’s…a 98% chance of having a baby WITHOUT. According to the late Dr. Hymie Gordon, past chairman of medical genetics at Mayo Clinic, the same low risk applies even to a woman who’s already had a baby with Down’s.    In that case, there is a risk of NOT GREATER THAN 1% that she will have another baby with the syndrome. Considering how good the ‘odds’ are and the dangers which prenatal tests always...

Girl With Genetic Defect Lives Seven Years After Parents Refuse Abortion

Hope Ann W. lost her battle against trisomy 18 [Edward’s syndrome] last week. But she lived seven years and brought joy to everyone around her. Doctors had urged Hope’s mother, Teri, to have an abortion after prenatal tests revealed her baby had a severely disabling genetic abnormality. “They told me it would be the humane thing, that there was absolutely no hope,” she told the Billings Gazette. “They were wrong. Had I listened to them, we wouldn’t have had seven years of pure joy.” Seven years of Hope, that is — and of hope. “The life she had was beautiful,” said Kevin Sparrow. “There were some rough times for sure. She had to struggle. But she had a chance to live. She had a chance to live.” Most babies born with the condition die within a few days, and fewer than 10 percent live for a year. Teri said she knows some people think the public money used for Hope’s care was wasted, but she disagrees. “We pay our taxes. We pay into a system that should be there when somebody, especially a child, is in need,” she said. “As a world power, don’t we have the responsibility to give our children a chance? Here we are the richest country in the world, and we say we can’t help a child live?” [22Jan07, LifeNews.com, Billings,...

Research on Pregnant Women with Cancer

Amy Langford was utterly surprised when, at 42, she found out she was pregnant. Her joy dissipated a few weeks later, when she and her husband were told that a suspicious lump in her right breast was cancerous. “The doctor came back and said he had ‘not very good news,’ ” recalled Amy’s husband, Gregg. “His second words were, ‘Of course, this means you will have to terminate your pregnancy.’ ” But the Langfords, did some research and found a group of physicians who specialize in treating pregnant women with breast cancer at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in nearby Houston. Mrs. Langford underwent amniocentesis, followed by breast-conserving surgery and four courses of chemotherapy. On May 23, 2005, she delivered Bryan, a healthy 6-pound-12-ounce baby boy. Radiation treatment was done only after that. “I had no hair when he was born,” Mrs. Langford said, “but he had a head full of hair.” For many years, the consensus in much of the medical community has been that pregnant women with breast cancer cannot undergo treatment without harming their babies — and must make a dreadful choice. That assumption is being challenged by the results of a small observational clinical trial carried out at M. D. Anderson, which found that women with invasive breast cancer may undergo surgery and chemotherapy during pregnancy and still have healthy babies. Under the protocol studied, chemotherapy is postponed until after the first trimester of pregnancy and radiation until after the birth. “We can now say that the ethical dilemma has been eliminated,” said Dr. Richard Theriault, a professor of medicine in...

Hydrocephalic Baby

Question: My family and I have a claim against — regarding the birth of our child (severe hydrocephalus).  Five sloppily performed ultrasounds missed the diagnosis (as late as 26 weeks).  If we had known, we would have delivered our child much earlier.  All the lawyers (and expert MDs) seem to be hung up on the fact that the only thing we could have done was have an abortion.  We are trying to make the case that an early delivery (32 weeks vs 36 weeks) would have also made a huge difference.  We are looking for an expert witness… Physician Responses:  I am not an OBGYN, but the case you have put out for support probably has a lot more involved than just whether a delivery at 32 weeks, with all the problems associated with immature lung tissue, than 36 weeks, which is essentially full term but not necessarily so.  I wonder about the language used in the email:  “5 sloppily performed ultrasounds missed the diagnosis as late as 26 weeks”, too.  Hydrocephalus can develop late in a pregnancy, and severe hydrocephalus leads to the brain tissue being forced to thin out against the inside of the skull, leading to severe cognitive and developmental problems.  Indeed, this can develop after birth, as I witnessed during my residency time.  It may not be that anyone was to blame and this is an opportunity for the parents of this child to grow in nurturing a special needs child.    You need a perinatologist… I think that this child probably has a major health issue and a lawsuit on a technicality would be in theory at...

Most Women Pregnant From Sexual Assault Don't Want Abortions

Elliot Institute director Dr. David Reardon says most women who become pregnant through rape or incest do not want abortions. Instead, most report feeling coerced into abortion and that abortion only increased their grief and trauma. Reardon, co-editor of the book Victims and Victors: Speaking Out About Their Pregnancies, Abortions, and Children Resulting from Sexual Assault, says that such exceptions are often seen as compassionate responses to women who would otherwise have no choice but to continue with the pregnancy. "Typically, both sides of the abortion debate have accepted the premise that women who become pregnant as a result of sexual assault want abortions," Reardon said. "It is thought that this will help them put the assault behind them, recover more quickly, and avoid the additional trauma of giving birth to a child conceived in a violent attack. Those who oppose such exceptions are often seen as insensitive and unconcerned about the welfare of women." However, Reardon says, research carried out for Victims and Victors suggests otherwise. In a survey of 192 women who became pregnant through rape or incest, nearly 80 percent said that they regretted their abortions, while none of the women who carried to term said that they wished they had not done so or that they had chosen abortion instead… "Many of the women in the survey also reported that they felt pressured by family members or health care workers to undergo abortions, and that they did not freely choose abortion for themselves," Reardon explained. "This was especially the case for those who became pregnant through incest; in almost every case, the abortion was chosen...

Liver Transplant Saves Newborn Baby After Mom Refused Abortion

Jacob has survived despite receiving a rare metabolic disorder of the liver from his mother, Keeley. Although doctors warned her that getting pregnant would be risky, Keeley had no thoughts about abortion once she found out she was carrying Jacob and that he had inherited the disorder from her. Like other women in her family, Keeley carries the gene for the disorder OTC-deficiency and doctors told her in January that both she and her unborn son could have died. Gibbs refused to have an abortion and both she and Jacob survived the pregnancy and birth. After he was born, Jacob apparently became the youngest person ever to have a liver transplant — at just 10 days old [St. Louis Children’s Hospital]. Three months after the surgery, both baby and mother are doing well. [22Apr06, St. Louis, MO...

“Gestational” Breast Cancer & The "Need" for Abortion: Hardest Case or Cruelest Myth?

By Joel Brind, Ph.D. We all know that abortion was marketed to American society through appeals based on the hard cases. The hardest of these is when the life of the mother is at stake. Perhaps the most common indication for a “life of the mother” abortion is the diagnosis of breast cancer in a woman who is pregnant. Heart-rending stories of such cases appear with some regularity in the popular press… Author, Beatrice Motamedi describes the emotionally crushing scenario of “Jana,” 38, who was finally pregnant after years of trying, including two years of fertility treatments. However, just three weeks after learning she was pregnant, Jana was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer in her breast. Typically, the doctors recommended an abortion “to make sure that Jana could be treated as aggressively as possible” with chemotherapy, following surgical removal of the tumor. But, “Jana said no,” according to Motamedi. Motamedi then discusses a little-known but highly important development: “a small but growing body of evidence indicates that women who are pregnant can be successfully treated for cancer without compromising the health of their unborn children.” In 1956, Drs. White and White reviewed the worldwide literature on “gestational breast cancer” (as this particular situation is referred to). Their conclusion, published in the Annals of Surgery, was that “no definite benefit could be claimed from therapeutic abortion.” Twenty years later, French doctor P. Juret wrote in his review of the literature that “the total inefficacy of therapeutic abortion is now certain.” This conclusion was echoed in the 1980 German review of Schweppe et al.: “There is no medical indication for an...

Rape Victims Find Abortion Alternatives/Update+: Brazilian Congresswoman, et al, Products of Rape

Brazilian Congresswoman Whose Mother was Raped, Voices Opposition to Abortion Brazilian Congresswoman Fatima Pelaes shared her personal testimony on the floor of the Brazilian House of Representatives during a vote on a measure that would protect the unborn from abortion. She told lawmakers that her mother was a victim of rape and decided to let her live rather than kill her through abortion. "I was born after a rape, I cannot support abortion!" she exclaimed.   On Wednesday, Brazil's House of Representatives passed the measure that grants legal protection to the unborn. It now will go before the Senate.   The Defense of Life Movement (DLM) in Porto Alegre said that during the vote on the measure, Pelaes took the podium and told her story. Her mother was the victim of rape while she was in a co-ed prison. At first she wanted to get an abortion, but she ended up deciding to keep her baby.     When she finished her remarks, DLM reported that "Everyone was moved and in tears.  Representative Arnaldo Faria took the podium and asked for a response that would match the testimony by Fatima Pelaes.  'My colleagues, after this testimony, how can we not support the life of the unborn?'"   The DLM urged Brazilians to continue to pressure their lawmakers as the measure prepares to go before the entire Senate. [21May2010, Brasilia, Brazil; CNA May 24, 2010]     Woman Conceived Through Rape Pleads for Life of Unborn Child in Argentina A 21 year-old Argentinean woman, whose mother is mentally ill and was raped in 1987, has written a moving letter pleading...

Brain Dead Virginia Woman’s Baby Born, 2005

The baby of brain-dead pregnant woman Susan Torres, 26, who is on life support, was born 3Aug05. Susan Torres, 26, lost consciousness from a stroke on May 7 after aggressive melanoma spread to her brain. Her husband, Jason Torres, said doctors told him his wife’s brain functions had stopped. “The situation is pretty stable,” said the brother-in-law, who is serving as the family’s spokesman. “Susan, we have said from the beginning, is the toughest person in that I.C.U. room.” Cecilia was one possible name the couple had discussed before the stroke. www.susantorresfund.org has helped raise about $400,000 in donations from around the world to pay the mounting medical bills: Germany, Britain, Ireland, Japan, even a check with no note from a soldier in Iraq. “She would have wanted us to fight for this baby – there’s no doubt in our minds,” he said. Ms. Torres’s melanoma has spread to lymph nodes and taken over her vital organs, but they continue to function. Since 1979, there have been at least a dozen (12) similar cases published in English medical literature, said Dr. Winston Campbell [dir, maternal-fetal medicine, Univ of CT Health Ctr]. [AP, 20July05; http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/21/health/21fetus.html? pagewanted=all 21July, N.Valko RN] UPDATE [5 August 2005] Two days after the birth of Susan Anne Catherine Torres and the death of her brain-dead mother, groups now believe this “miracle baby” will help preserve life and convince abortion rights supporters to switch sides. Amber Dolle [American Life League, Cybercast News Service]: “It has shown the humanity of the child in the womb”. Abortion rights groups such as Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America have remained silent...

Prenatal Hospice / Perinatal Hospice

Perinatal Hospice http://perinatalhospice.org  Hospice care serves patients of all ages…even those yet to be born. Last year, Mary Gravina, a social worker at the nonprofit Hospice Care Network, received a call from a pregnant mother of three in Merrick. Donna Dobkowski told the social worker that she had been informed by her doctor that the fetus growing in her womb would not survive long after birth. The child was developing without kidneys, which is fatal. Her doctor advised that she terminate the pregnancy at 14 weeks, when the abnormality was first noticed. She had her own plan. Dobkowski wanted to give her child life, even if that meant only a few good minutes. She continued the pregnancy, despite the concern of her doctor and other doctors she saw for confirmation of her child's grave disease — Potter's syndrome. During her sixth month of pregnancy, she was referred to Gravina at the care network, who helped her devise a birth plan for her child and her family. Gravina was invited into the labor and delivery suite when Jonathan Dobkowski was born in May. After an emergency cesarean section, mother and father held their newborn son. The baby's first cries sounded normal, and the boy looked healthy.  But his lungs were not fully developed because of the missing kidneys, and he died after an hour in his mother's arms. But during that time, with Gravina at their side, the couple was able to name their baby, gaze into his eyes, hold him, baptize him, kiss him and introduce him to his three siblings. Gravina bought each of the children a camera to take...

Assault Rape Pregnancies Are Rare

First, let’s define the term “rape”. We should use the phrase “forced rape” or “assault rape” for that specifies what we’re talking about. Rape can also be statutory. Depending upon your state law, statutory rape is intercourse with a girl under a certain age, often 16. Statutory rape can be consensual, but it is still statutory rape. Another category is “date rape”. For some reason, this is supposed to be different, but, forced rape is still rape, regardless of whether it occurs on a date or behind the bushes. If a college woman is raped on a date, she should report it to the police and pursue charges. Further, she should undergo a medical examination and treatment, just as she would in the aftermath of an assault rape. It is not a separate category. Assault rape pregnancies are extremely rare…How many forced rapes result in a pregnancy?…There have been some studies. In a statistical abstract of the U.S. in 1989, there were 90,000 rapes reported in the United States. [Bureau of Census Table #283] Another study from the US Justice Department, surveyed 49,000 households annually between the years 1973-1987. In 1973, it reported 95,934 completed rapes. In 1987, the figure was 82,505. The study stated that only 53% were reported to police. Factoring this in, the totals were 181,000 rapes in 1973 and 155,000 in 1987. In August 1995, the US Justice Department, using a different study with different questions, returned a result of 170,000 completed rapes plus 140,000 attempted rapes (210,000). There are approximately 100,000,000 females old enough to be at risk for rape in the U.S. If...

Rape, Incest, & Abortion: A Glimpse Behind the Myths

By Dr. David Reardon, Director of the Elliot Institute for Social Sciences Research, 1994 How does one intelligently discuss the complex issue of rape pregnancies and abortion in less than 800 words? Not thoroughly; but we can touch on a few highlights which will help to dispel many of the myths and prejudices which surround this issue. It is commonly assumed that sexual assault victims who become pregnant naturally want abortions. But in fact, in the only major study of pregnant rape victims ever done, Dr. Sandra Mahkom found that 75-85 percent chose against abortion. This fact alone should cause people to pause and reflect on the presumption that abortion is wanted or even best for sexual assault victims. Several reasons are given for not aborting. First 70 percent of all women believe abortion is immoral, even though many also feel it should be a legal choice for others. Approximately the same percentage of pregnant rape victims believe abortion would be just another act of violence perpetrated against their bodies, and against their child. Second, some see an intrinsic meaning or purpose to the child. This child was brought into their lives, by a horrible, repulsive act. But, perhaps God, or fate, will use the child for some greater purpose. Good can come from evil. Third, victims of assault often become introspective. Their sense of the value of life, and respect for others is heightened. They have been victimized, and the thought that they in turn might victimize their own innocent child through abortion is repulsive to them. Fourth, at least at a subconscious level, the victim may sense...

Rape and Incest are Tragic, But Abortion Doesn't Heal the Pain

What rape takes away from a woman, abortion can not restore. Firm statistics show that in the entire United States in one year, no more than ~500 women become pregnant from assault rape. … by Frederica Matthewes-Green Opinion polls on the abortion issue sometimes reveal profound moral confusion among many Americans, such as the people who tell pollsters that abortion is murder, but that it should remain legal. There is no ambivalence, however, on abortion when it involves rape and incest. According to a 1999 Wirthlin poll, 62 percent of Americans would endorse a law prohibiting abortion except in cases when the pregnancy would kill the woman or when it is the result of rape or incest. Remove that last clause, and support for the pro-life position drops 30 points. It seems like common sense. Sexual violence is a nightmare. Dragging it out for nine months of pregnancy seems but an added cruelty. Then there's the child, for whom the truth about his or her father could be devastating. But did anyone think to ask the victims themselves? In their new book, Victims and Victors [Acorn Books, 2000], editors David Reardon, Amy Sobie and Julie Makimaa draw on testimonies of 192 women who experienced pregnancy as the result of rape or incest, and 55 children who were conceived through sexual assault. It turns out that when victims of violence speak for themselves, their opinion of abortion is nearly unanimous-and the opposite of what the average person expects. Nearly all the women interviewed in this anecdotal survey said they regretted aborting the babies conceived via rape or incest. Of those...

Screening/Testing For Genetic Abnormalities Can Prove To Be Inaccurate

Keep in mind that screening/testing for genetic abnormalities can prove to be inaccurate… CYSTIC FIBROSIS SCREENING LED TO "UNNECESSARY" ABORTIONS, RESEARCHERS SAY "New Scientist" magazine has reported that a national U.S. screening program to test pregnant women and their partners for cystic fibrosis may have led to unnecessary prenatal tests and abortions. Representatives of the American College of Medical Genetics reported at a conference that in 20 cases, parents had amniocentesis tests – which can cause miscarriages – and some had abortions after being screened/tested for only one of two gene mutations that must be present for cystic fibrosis to occur. The president of the ACMG also told "New Scientist" that he knew of at least 150 cases in which unnecessary prenatal tests were carried out because of mistakes in interpreting the parents' tests. [Elliot Institute News Vol.2, No. 5 — 19May03...

Congenital Hard Cases: Cornelia De Lange Syndrome

I wanted to comment about hard cases. I have a son who is 7 years old who has Cornelia de Lange Syndrome. He was diagnosed at @ 4 mo. It has not been easy raising him thus far; but, I must say I would not take any amount of money for him or the experience of having him not only in my life but the lives of my other children. Time doesn’t permit to tell you all we have learned but let’s just say we learn something new about what it means to love someone unconditionally every day. "Sam" is very special and I know God has him on this earth for a reason. We rejoice when we see glimpses of His reasons from time to time. I know 95% of people who knew they had a child with this syndrome would abort but they would be missing out on the experience of a lifetime.  — D.W.,...

Congenital Hard Cases: Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type 4

My name is Dr. M.M.; I am a pediatrician.      Regarding children with OI type 4: although I am not an expert on this disorder, I do have some knowledge which may be of help and consolation to the parents. Osteogenesis imperfecta type 4 is the least severe of all the types of osteogenesis imperfecta. It is acquired by autosomal dominant inheritance, meaning that only one parent may be carrying the gene for it and thus it is less severe. However, it is still characterized by "weak bones" and the baby may be born with significant bowing of the lower legs at birth and fractures of the bones are possible but not always the rule. The spine can also be bowed and usually these patients are short in adult life. During puberty, improvement occurs and few fractures are experienced in adolescence. Hearing impairment can occur but less so than with other forms of osteogenesis imperfecta. The child once born should see a geneticist, have a hearing screen at birth and later and should be monitored for fractures with x-rays. An orthopedic surgeon should also be part of the team of caring for the child to fix fractures and correct the bowing of the bones. Of all the types, this is actually the "best type" because it is the least severe and is not lethal. It will be a challenge to the parents to have to monitor for bone fractures and the things mentioned above, but the child should be a blessing, nonetheless. I hope this is helpful. Best regards and if you have any further questions, please contact me...