Population Decline

No Need for Population Control

Contrary to the fear mongering of the population alarmists, the world is not heading for a demographic catastrophe. The latest data on world population from the U.N. Population Division reveals a number of trends that seem to indicate otherwise. The following is PRI’s brief overview of some of the findings from the recently released 2015 Revision of the World Population Prospects. According to the U.N. Population Division, world population is estimated to be 7.3 billion today. That number is expected to rise to 9.7 billion by 2050 and 11.2 billion by 2100. In the past two and a half decades, world population has increased by 2 billion people. Yet despite the rapid rise in world population, the percentage of people living with hunger in developing countries has actually dropped from 24% to 14% over the same time period. Welcoming another 4 billion to the human family does not appear to necessitate a demographic catastrophe. Child Mortality Info Graphic In fact, the future appears to be quite bright for future generations, especially in poorer and less developed nations. Infant and childhood mortality are set to decline sharply worldwide. By 2100, the rate of deaths among children under the age of five will fall as much as 82% in less developed nations and 80% in the world’s least developed countries. Life Expectancy Worldwide info graphic Future generations will also have significantly longer lifespans to look forward to. World average life expectancy at birth in the early 1950’s was 48 years for women and 45 for men. Today those numbers are 73 for women and 68 for men. By 2100, life expectancy...

Never Say ‘Die’

Even as Population Growth Dramatically Slows, the United Nations Keeps Hyping ‘World Population Day’ On July 11th, the United Nations will celebrate its 26th World Population Day. The point of this annual exercise is to raise money to promote abortion, sterilization and contraception among poor and vulnerable women by alarming us about the dangers of global population growth. The problem with this narrative is that, in many regions of the world, the population is declining, not growing. About half the world’s population lives in “low-fertility” countries, where women have fewer than 2.1 children on average over their lifetimes. Low-fertility countries now include all of Europe (except Iceland), the Americas (17 countries), and most of Asia (19 countries). The list of low-fertility countries include China, the United States, Brazil, the Russian Federation, Japan and Viet Nam. In other words, growth rates have dramatically declined from the late 1960s when the global population grew at a rate of 2.1% each year. That rate is now about 1% a year. The UN’s low variant projection (historically the most accurate) indicates that it will peak at around 8.3 billion in 2050. Even the medium variant projection shows population growth slowing to 0.1% by the century’s end, and turning negative beyond 2100. In either case, the population of the world will never double again. As these numbers suggest, fertility rates have dipped to all-time lows. The U.N.’s medium variant projection estimates that women are now averaging 2.45 children over their reproductive lifetime, while the low variant pegs this at only 2.05. The global average was 4.97 just 60 years ago. Under either variant, this...

Abstinence Does Help to Lower Teen Birth Rates

A new study released 29 May 2014, reported that America’s total fertility rate has hit a low that has not been experienced since 1986. At just 1.86 births per woman, America is now on the same course as many European nations. Researchers say that the main reason for the birth rate in America is the “striking drop in teen birth rates.” The new teen birthrate is a record low: 26.6 births per 1,000 women aged 15-19. This is a 10% drop from 2012 and a 57% drop since 1991. Abstinence really DOES work and our nation is beginning to take notice! [3 June 2014, abstinence.net, http://www.abstinence.net/uncategorized/abstinence-helps-lower-teen-birth-rates/ ;...

U.S. Population Falls to Dangerous Levels Below Replacement Rate

The fertility rate in the United States fell again to another record low in 2012, in part due to the recession that is making couples more reticent to consider having more children in their family. While abortion contributes to destroy more than one million unborn children on an annual basis in the USA, new figures from the CDC show the American population is at dangerously low levels — so low that the U.S. birth rate is below the replacement rate needed to sustain the population [replacement level is 2.1 children per couple per reproductive lifetime in developed nations].  ...

Canadian Research Group Foresees Demographic-Caused Economic Collapse of Asian Nations Including China

In its quarterly examination of the economic outlook for the world’s major economies, the Conference Board of Canada identifies rapidly aging populations coupled with well-below-replacement-level birth rates in the Asia-Pacific region as indicators that the once powerful economies of these countries are headed toward economic collapse. “Productivity gains and a large, young working-age population have done much to boost Asian economic growth over the past three decades. But Asia’s demographic dividend is quickly coming to an end. Due to fewer births and longer life expectancies, the average age of the population in Asia is increasing rapidly,” says Kip Beckman, principal economist and author of the Conference Board’s World Outlook-Spring 2013. Beckman points to Japan as an example of what will soon happen in China due to its impending population crash. Japan, says Beckman, has already arrived at the point of no return to which China is headed. While seven per cent of the population of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan is 65 years or older today, in Japan that demographic has increased to 23 per cent, Beckman says. By 2035, the median age in China will increase from 35 to 45 – equal to Japan’s current median age. Beckman notes that this demographic shift is especially prevalent in China due in part to the country’s one-child policy. The low birth rate due to the one-child policy is exacerbated, he suggests, by other factors that include a massive gender imbalance in the country because of sex-selective abortion. An analysis of sex-selective abortion in China and other East Asian countries by Dr. Therese Hesketh of the UCL Centre for International Health...

Abortion Effect on Economy: U.S. Seeing Slowest Population Growth Since 1930

After almost 40 years of legalized abortions throughout the United States — and longer in states that okayed abortions pre-Roe — the U.S. population has been decimated to the point that the nation is seeing the lowest population growth since the 1930s. Abortion has destroyed not only one generation of Americans but a second as well — people who should be boosting the fertility rate in their childbearing years now, who were victims of abortions in the 1970s and 1980s. In total, more than 55 million Americans are been victimized by abortions and millions more were never born because their parents were aborted. Bloomberg News has more on how the U.S. fertility rate is at historically low levels, though abortion is never mentioned as a cause, of course. The Census Bureau estimates there will be 315.1 million people living in the country on New Year’s Day, a 0.73 percent rise from last year’s estimate and 2.05 percent more than the most recent census count in April 2010. At the current pace, the nation’s population will grow by 7.3 percent during the decade, the lowest level since the 7.25 percent increase recorded between 1930 and 1940, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The slow rate of growth during the first part of the decade indicates the U.S. continues to emerge slowly from the worst economic downturn since the 1930s. The nation’s birth rate and immigration fell in the aftermath of the 2007-09 recession. Between 2000 and 2010, the Census Bureau reported the nation’s population grew by 9.7 percent. Bloomberg blames the economy but ignores how abortion has adversely affected the...

The West is Dying …Except for the US (2010)

Commentary: The West is Dying …Except for the US We don’t hear too much these days about the population explosion. The reason being is that there isn’t one anymore. In order to take a closer look at this, we examine worldwide statistics on birth, death and immigration. The birth rate is the ultimate determinant. In a developed nation, the average woman must bear 2.1 children in order to maintain its current level of population. In underdeveloped nations, the rate must be 2.3 or more because of higher infant and child mortality. In most countries, during recent years, fewer people have died than have been born. This is because the average age of life expectancy has been extended, and for now, results in an increase in the total population. This varies in different countries. Many people want to come into the US, Canada and other developed nations. Very few want to move to Libya, Cuba or Russia. This is why total populations in the US and Canada, particularly, continue to increase. In the US, people born in 1970 had a life expectancy of 70 years. By the mid-90s it was 76 and has continued to slowly increase. With this, there has been a change in ethnicity. The US has become more Hispanic and Western Europe has become more Muslim. To look at a tragic example of depopulation, Italy’s birth rate is 1.2 persons born per woman. This is the lowest in a nation where accurate records are kept. Ten years ago, there were about 5,000 more Italians buried each year than were being born, and this number has continued to...

Deaths Exceed Births in Increasing Number of Major US Cities (5/08)

The collapse of birthrates is a sign of huge social and moral transformations, says prominent conservative commentator The United States is joining Europe and Japan in collapsing birthrates, as an increasing number of metropolitan areas, such as Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, continue to report more deaths than births.   "Americans should take a close look at the fact that in a handful of major metropolitan areas, deaths now outnumber births. In times past, this would have indicated a major catastrophe such as famine, plague, or war. But with regard to these cities, the causes include nothing to do with famine, plague, or war," warned prominent conservative commentator Albert Mohler on his blog Friday.   The Pittsburgh population has decreased from 423,000 to about 312,000 since 1980, with an approximately 60,000 person decline since the beginning of this century, according to a May 18 New York Times report that sparked Mohler's commentary.   While births outnumbered deaths by about 11,500 during the 1990s, the city has seen about 25,000 more deaths than births during this decade.   Mohler chides those who think that severe population decline is a problem reserved to Europe and Japan.   "Those same citizens are also probably unaware that America's birthrate just slightly above base population replacement is sustained at that level only by the higher reproduction rates of new immigrants – to whom we should be grateful for representing their hopes by having children."   "The situation in Pittsburgh is complicated by factors including economic shifts and a general loss of population. But when all things are taken into consideration, this means that Pittsburgh will see more...

Worldwide Water Facts

** An estimated 2 to 4 million people in the world die each year as a result of contaminated water. ** One billion people in the world do not have access to safe and affordable drinking water ** Accessible water that could save thousands of lives often is available, even in drought areas, but it is located 100 to 300 feet underground. ** Two-thirds of the world's population live in areas receiving only one-fourth of the world's annual rainfall. ** A human needs four to five gallons of water daily for drinking and other uses. ** The United Nations estimates 900 million people each year suffer from diarrhea and other diseases caused by contaminated water. The World Bank says bad water sickens 1 billion people annually. ** Buying clean water can be costly. Poor people in slums often pay five to 10 times more per liter of water than wealthy people living in the same city. In Port-au-Prince, Haiti, residents spent 20 percent of their income on water. In Nigeria, it's [sic] 18 percent of annual income. ** Two-thirds of the world is made up of water but less than 1 percent is drinkable. [Sources: British Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, Global Water, Water Encyclopedia.com, Dow Chemical Co., Water Partners International; CFCA, Winter...

Spain’s Socialist Government Adopts New Policies in Face of Underpopulation

The socialist government of Spain has surprised everyone by adopting a pro-natal policy. Each newborn will receive a check for Euro 2,500 (about 3,938 dollars). If the newborn is born into a family with three or more children, the amount is increased to Euro 3,500. In announcing the policy, President Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero said to the Parliament that “In order to continue progressing Spain needs more families with more children. And families need more aid to have more babies and more resources for their upbringing.” Even a blind man could see that this is so. In only 30 years, the average size of the Spanish family has dropped from 3.8 members to 2.9. Today, two and a half million Spanish people live alone. There are now only about 1.7 million large Spanish families–that is, families with three or more children–and the number is steadily falling. Along with Italy and Greece, Spain has one of the lowest fertility rates in the EU. Spain’s population is again rapidly, and is on the cusp of absolute population decline. In 1996 Spain added only 11,177 people to its population. Since that year, the numbers have gone up, but only because immigrants from Latin America and North Africa are having children. [18Mar08, LifeNews.com, Carlos...

German Population Plunge "Irreversible" (11/06)

[Federal Stats Office] One third of all European children will be born to Muslim families by 2025; the birthrate has dropped so low that immigration numbers cannot compensate. Germany has the lowest birthrate in Europe – 1.36 children/woman average, with an expected pop loss of up to 12 million by 2050. [German news Deutsche Welle, 9Nov]. With a 22% reduction in the workforce and increasing costs for senior assistance and medical care, the drop in population is expected to have a radical impact on the nation’s economy, along with the welfare budget. [Deutsche Welle; Brussels Journal] There are an estimated 50 million Muslims living in Europe; this is expected to double over the next 20 years. [Agence France-Presse; 9Nov06, LifeSiteNews.com,...

The State of Our Unions: Families Without Children (2006)

Families Without Children: Report Reveals Changes in Attitudes Towards Kids. Life without children is a growing social reality for an increasing number of American adults. This is the conclusion of the 2006 edition of "The State of Our Unions" report on marriage, released last week by the National Marriage Project, based at Rutgers [the State University of New Jersey]. Up until recently, for most people, the greater part of adult life was spent with young children forming part of the household. A combination of marrying later, less children and longer life expectancy means, however, that a significantly greater part of adult life is spent without kids being in the house.   The report, titled "Life Without Children," was authored by Barbara Dafoe Whitehead and David Popenoe. They start by noting how many recent publications complain of the difficulties in raising children. Many surveys also show that parents report lower levels of happiness compared to non-parents. In fact, an increasing number of married couples now see children as an obstacle to their marital happiness.   This isn't to say that children are rejected by the majority of couples. Nevertheless, there is a growing feeling of trepidation about taking on the responsibilities of parenthood. Of course, bringing up kids has never been easy, but there are good reasons why a growing number of parents are feeling increased pressures, the report explains.   A weakening of marriage bonds contributes to the difficulties of having children. Cohabiting women, the report explains, may postpone childbearing until they have a better sense of the long-term future of the relationship. If they wait too long, however,...

Declaration of 12th Asia Pacific Congress on Family

DECLARATION OF THE DELEGATES OF THE 12TH ASIA PACIFIC CONGRESS ON LOVE, LIFE AND THE FAMILY Kuta Bali, Indonesia, August 5-7, 2005 We, as representatives of many of the countries of the Asia-Pacific region and leaders concerned about life and family, declare our readiness to contribute to the dialogue on the future of life and family in our region. As citizens and leaders of our own cultures, we also accept our own responsibility to participate in the strengthing of the family and the protection of human life and dignity in our region. We call upon the governments and citizens of Asia to reaffirm the recognition – expressed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of the United Nations – of the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of all, including the inviolable right to life, as the foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in Asia. Our shared identity as Asians is based upon recognition of the fundamental dignity of the human person, which is possessed by all and must always be respected, from conception until natural death This intrinsic dignity is the basis of all human rights and must never be violated in any way. We therefore plead that every form of abortion be prohibited by law and that all life will be protected and welcomed in our societies and in our hearts. Government, as servant of the primary institutions of social stability, marriage, and family, must ensure the development of social and political conditions in which marriages and families will thrive and grow. We therefore plead with our government and social leaders that laws and policies will be implemented...

You Haven't Heard of the Doha Report?

Many people haven’t heard of the Doha Report. The reason is that it has been almost totally suppressed by the public media and certainly by radical pro-abortion, anti-family activists at the United Nations. The reason is obvious. They didn’t like it. But it’s for that very reason we resurrect it here in this newsletter. The Doha International Conference for the Family was held 29–30 November 2004 in Doha, the capital of the tiny Arabian Gulf state of Qatar. This conference was preceded by government meetings in Benin, Azerbaijan and Latvia during 2004. They included the World Congress of Families in March in Mexico City, Mexico, the Scandinavian Dialogue in May in Stockholm, Sweden, the European Dialogue in August in Geneva, Switzerland and the Asia Pacific Family Dialogue in October in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. In addition, there were hundreds of civil society meetings in local areas in more than 134 cities around the world. Reports prepared for this International Conference included a publication collecting the results of over 200 community meetings and a preliminary volume of international scholarship. We are pleased to reprint a report on the Conference by William L. Saunders, Human Rights Counsel at the Family Research Council and board member of the International Right to Life Federation. On December 6, 2004, the United Nations General Assembly observed the final event of the “International Year of the Family.” The General Assembly officially received the reports of pro-family conferences that took place throughout the world over the course of 2004 and adopted Resolution A/59/L.21. The resolution, among other things, “[e]ncourages governments to make every possible effort … to integrate...

Report on the Doha International Conference for the Family (11/2004)

In conjunction with the Tenth Anniversary of the International Year of the Family, 29-30 November 2004, Doha, Qatar TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………..4 II. STRUCTURE OF THE DOHA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE FAMILY………………………………………………………………5 II. OVERVIEW OF THE PREPARATORY PROCESS FOR THE DOHA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE FAMILY……8III. FINDINGS AND WORK PRODUCTS …………………………………………….11 IV. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FINAL SESSION OF THE DOHA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE FAMILY…………….13 APPENDIX – The Doha Declaration……………………………………………..15 I. INTRODUCTION In 2004, the United Nations celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the 1994 International Year of the Family. The UN General Assembly welcomed the decision of the State of Qatar to mark this important anniversary.[1] Under the patronage and generosity of the Consort of His Highness the Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al-Missned, President of Supreme Council for Family Affairs, the Doha International Conference for the Family convened in Doha, Qatar, on November 29-30, 2004. The Doha International Conference for the Family explored and analyzed the implications of Article 16(3) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which proclaims that “the family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the state.@ The year-long preparatory process for the Doha International Conference for the Family included governmental events, regional dialogues and hundreds of locally organized civil society discussions. During the final meeting in Doha, representatives from governments, civil society, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, religious groups and academia evaluated the outcomes of the preparatory events, reviewed findings and documentation, and developed their own recommendations. The series of interlocking events concluding...

U.S. Pregnancy Rate Lowest in Two Decades: Trends in Births, Abortions, and Miscarriages

CDC: Trends in Pregnancies and Pregnancy Rates by Outcome: Estimates for the United States, 1976-96 The number of pregnancies (live births, induced abortions, and fetal losses) in the United States fell from 6.78 to 6.24 million, a decline of about half a million between 1990 and 1996. The pregnancy rate in 1996 was 104.7 pregnancies per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years, 9 percent lower than in 1990 and the lowest rate since 1976. The pregnancy rate declined for all women under 30 years of age, but the sharpest drop was among teenagers, with the teen pregnancy rate falling by 15 percent from its record high in 1991. Among the factors driving this downturn in teen pregnancies… [is] the leveling off of teen sexual activity. Pregnancy rates remain highest for women in their twenties. For example, the pregnancy rate at age 20-24 years was 140 per 1,000 women (14 percent) for white women, 302 (30 percent) for black women, and 277 (28 percent) for Hispanic women. A detailed, comprehensive new report from the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tracks the effects of changes in sexual activity, marriage, contraceptive use, and other factors on pregnancies and pregnancy rates over the past two decades in the United States. Using complete counts of births from the birth registration system and estimates of abortions and fetal loss, the report examines patterns by age, race and Hispanic origin, and marital status. The 6 million-plus pregnancies in 1996 in the U.S. resulted in 3.9 million births, 1.3 million induced abortions and almost a million fetal deaths. This means that 62...

China's Coercive One-Child Policy Leaves Shortage of Wives (5/04)

Beijing, China  — China’s rigid one-child policy is leaving an unexpected legacy — a nationwide wife shortage. Chinese news media are reporting that the country now faces a “major threat” from a demographic imbalance which will leave millions of men without wives. The one-child policy, which has been decried as a major human rights violation by activist groups throughout the world, has triggered the twin tragedies of female infanticide and abortion. China now has about 117 boys for every 100 girls, with nearly 13 million more boys than girls under the age of nine. By the year 2020, China could have some 40 million men who cannot find wives—a disturbing development which could have devastating implications for Chinese society for generations to come.[http://www.lifenews.com/nat515.html,...

Economic Price of Declining Birth Rates

A report by demographers at the UN Population Deivision concludes that economic development in Western Asian countries has been dependent upon migrating laborers from neighboring countries because the countries’ indigenous populations were insufficient. The economic boom of the 1970s in Western Asia, triggered by higher oil prices, was sustained by a massive influx of immigrants, which increased by an annual rate of 19 percent from 1975 to 1980. Dependence on migrants from neighboring labor-rich countries has continued. In Israel where the birthrate is well below replacement, its economy has survivied over the past 15 years by the steady influx of immigrants from Russia and other countries like Romania, the Philippines and Thailand. A number of East and Southeast Asian countries were also able to maintain economic growth in the face of declining fertility, by turning to immigrant labor. Even the financial crisis of 1997 in Asia saw no decline in “demands for migrant workers in certain sectors”. Had the workers not been available, development in many countries would have stalled due to labor shortages. Despite the U.N.’s own conclusions about the need for people to sustain economic development, population control ideologies at USAID continue to claim otherwise: they claim that “population planning” and “fertility reduction” is necessary to jump-start development. [Population Research Institute Weekly Briefing, 19Nov2003; HLA Action News, Winter...

Population Reversal for Taiwan

Taiwan is attempting to reverse its continuously declining birthrate, which stands at 1.16 children per woman, down from 6 children in the 1950s. The Ministry of the Interior, and Council for Economic Planning and Development has proposed awarding couples monetarily if they give birth to more than two children. The move comes at a time when China is being heavily criticized for its policy of coercive abortion and forced sterilizations. The birthrate must be at least 2.1 children per family to maintain a replacement level. [Pro-Life Infonet, 16Oct02; HLA Action News, Fall...