Stem Cell – Archive

December 2007: Stem Cell Research

Talking Points on iPS Cells Adult Stem Cells Treat MS and Arthritis in Mice  NEW! Reprogrammed Skin Cells Strut Their Stuff (8Dec07) Researchers Turn Skin Cells Into Pluripotent Stem Cells (20Nov07) Scientists Discover How to Isolate Stem Cells in Womb Tissue Cord Blood Registry Sees Strong Growth in Charitable Banking Program  Menstrual Blood Could Be A Rich Source of Adult Stem Cells (JTM, 07)… Talking Points on iPS Cells — http://stemcellresearch.org/statement/pptalkingpointsweb.pdf     ADULT STEM CELLS TREAT MS AND ARTHRITIS IN MICE. As we celebrate the creation and potential of induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, adult stem cell research at Stanford University finds that blood stem cells taken from a donor with a healthy immune system effectively treated multiple sclerosis and arthritis in mice. From the story in the Telegraph: Thousands of patients with arthritis and multiple sclerosis are given new hope today by scientists who have developed a way to alter the immune system. Both conditions are caused when the immune system becomes faulty and attacks the body. Scientists have discovered that by injecting stem cells, the body's building blocks, taken from a healthy donor into the patient they can effectively transplant the donor's immune system and cure the condition. Until now, such a transplant would have been possible only by giving the patient aggressive treatments such as radiotherapy to wipe out the faulty immune system before carrying out a bone marrow transplant to provide new cells. But under the new system patients would be treated with a toxin to clear out the old immune system before being injected with healthy stem cells that would form a new immune...

November 2007: Stem Cell Research

NEW!  Dolly the Sheep Maker Ian Wilmut Abandons Cloning — New Technique May Make Cloning & ESCR Obsolete — 6 Articles Umbilical Cord Donation Helps Stem Cell Research Brain Stem Cells Restore Memory in Mice "Bionic" Nerve to Repair Injured Limbs  US Firm Proposes Using "Spare" Human Embryos For Stem Cell Experiments  Cord Blood Service to Debut in Pennsylvania… Dolly Creator Wilmut Abandons Cloning. Cloning pioneer Ian Wilmut says he will no longer use in stem cell research the technique that resulted in the creation of Dolly the sheep but will instead pursue another form of experimentation that does not require the destruction of embryos. Wilmut's announcement led some to speculate it might mark the "beginning of the end," as the British newspaper The Telegraph described it, for research, or therapeutic, cloning. Wilmut, who had received a license two years ago in Great Britain to clone human embryos, said he has discontinued his experiments in the cloning field in order to work on a technique developed in Japan that he believes has more potential to produce stem cells that could treat debilitating diseases, The Telegraph reported Nov. 16. The method Wilmut believes has a greater capability to result in therapies has been described as cell regression. The technique, pioneered by Shinya Yamanaka at Kyoto University, has been shown in experiments with mice to enable skin cells to be converted into cells with embryonic-like qualities, according to the newspaper. Such cells would have the advantage of not being rejected because they are the patient's own cells. "The work which was described from Japan of using a technique to change cells...

October 2007: Stem Cell Research / Disease Research

List of Medical Advances with Umbilical Cord Blood/ Other Adult Stem Cell Research Child Lymphomas NEW! Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to Three Embryonic Stem Cell Researchers Doctor Fights Cancer Using Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Adult Stem Cell Success–In the Flesh! / Wake Forest Scientists Discover New Type of Stem Cells California Stem Cell Research Panel's Top Scientific Adviser Resigns Dog Arthritis Adult Stem Cell Success New Human Trial With Adult Stem Cells to Treat MS in the UK… List of Medical Advances with Umbilical Cord Blood/ Other Adult Stem Cell Research http://www.stemcellresearchcures.com/MedicalAdvances.html  Child Lymphomas http://www.kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=familydoctor&lic=44&cat_id=136&article_set=22979&ps=104     Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to Three Embryonic Stem Cell Researchers 8Oct07 for their role in looking at mouse genes and using their studies to determine the human genes that cause diabetes, heart disease and cancer.Pro-life advocates oppose embryonic stem cell research on human beings because days-old unborn children must be killed to obtain their cells. They support the use of animal and adult stem cells which already are being used to treat a variety of cancers, heart disease, and diabetes. Americans Mario Capecchi and Oliver Smithies and British scientist Sir Martin Evans split the prestigious award and its prize of $1.5 million. They were honored for a technique called gene targeting which lets scientists identify and alter the genes in mice. It allows them to study how the genes play a role in diseases. The Nobel prize committee mentioned embryonic stem cell research in their citation to the scientists saying they had discovered "principles for introducing specific gene modification in mice by the use of embryonic stem cells."However, the science...

September-August 2007: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

Human-Animal Embryo Study Wins Approval in Britain / Update NEW! Researchers Identify New Type of Adult Stem Cells to Treat Heart Attacks & Muscle Injury & Disease  Adult Stem Cells Rebuild Alabama Woman's Heart / 'Your Own Stem Cells Work!' British Researchers Grow Human Heart Valve Tissue With Adult Stem Cells Adult Stem Cell Research Used to Treat Macular Degeneration Adult Stem Cell Research Using Rabbits Shows Progress in Treating Cornea Disorders Scientists Help Multiple Sclerosis Patients… HUMAN-ANIMAL EMBRYO STUDY SET TO WIN APPROVAL: Mixing to be allowed in search for new medical treatments Plans to allow British scientists to create human-animal embryos are expected to be approved tomorrow by the government's fertility regulator. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority published its long-awaited public consultation on the controversial research yesterday, revealing that a majority of people were "at ease" with scientists creating the hybrid embryos. Researchers want to create hybrid embryos by merging human cells with animal eggs, in the hope they will be able to extract valuable embryonic stem cells from them. The cells form the basic building blocks of the body and are expected to pave the way for revolutionary therapies for diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and even spinal cord injuries. The consultation papers were released ahead of the authority's final decision on the matter, which will mark the end of almost a year of intense lobbying by scientists and a fervent campaign by organisations opposed to research involving embryonic stem cells. Using animal eggs will allow researchers to push ahead unhindered by the shortage of human eggs. Under existing laws, the embryos must be destroyed after 14...

Japanese Team May Have Found The "Perfect" Stem Cell (7/07)

Since its publication in the journals Nature and Stem Cell on June 7, a report that Japanese researchers have produced embryo-like stem cells from the somatic (body) cells of mice has made headlines around the world and prompted speculation that the scientific community's brief obsession with cloning experiments for stem cell research is about to end…   [this has caused a huge shake-up in the stem cell research world, as more documentation forced acceptance in November 2007]    …Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University…told the London Times in an interview, "Neither eggs nor embryos are necessary. I've never worked with either." Yamanaka was in Britain presenting his findings to a conference on stem cell research at the University of Manchester.   Yamanaka's experiments involved a mouse skin cell into which was introduced four proteins which "reprogram" the cell's nuclear DNA making it pluripotent – having the same qualities as a stem cell taken from a very early-stage embryo.   Stem cells are those the body produces to replace and renew tissues. As such, they are sought by researchers for medical applications in curing diseases and injuries. Adult stem cells are now commonly used in some forms of cancer treatment and have seen success in experimental treatments of Parkinson's disease and diabetes, among others.   Most researchers in stem cells agree that stem cells found in various parts of the body are, to greater or lesser degrees, limited in the different types of tissue they can produce. The pressure to obtain embryonic stem cells derives from their so-called "pluripotency," the characteristic of the mass of cells found inside the embryo in the...

July & June 2007: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

Adult Stem Cell Research Makes Progress for Heart Patients as Embryonic Debate Goes On Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Research Treatments Help Children With Type 1 Diabetes   Adult Stem Cells From Human Umbilical Cord Blood Successfully Engineered To Make Insulin (CP, 6/07)  Study Shows Adult Stem Cell Research Helps Type 1 Diabetics (JAMA, 4/07) Adult Stem Cell Patch Restores Vision: Corneal Cultivation Opens Way to Assist People with Eye Surface Damage UK Reproductive Tech Bill Allows Much More than Human/Animal Hybrids NEW! US House Committee Adopts Amendment for Adult Stem Cell Research Inventory Program; Congress Works Toward Funding Ethical Stem Cell Research   Ireland Neurologist: Patients Being Misled About Embryonic Stem Cell Research Benefits Stowers Embryonic Stem Cell Research Institute Puts Expansion Plans on Hold     Delaware Defeats Embryonic Stem Cell Research Bill…   ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH MAKES PROGRESS AS EMBRYONIC DEBATE GOES ON. As politicians continue to debate funding embryonic stem cell research, studies on adult stem cells show continued promise. In the first trial of its kind in the world, 60 patients who have recently suffered a major heart attack will be injected with selected stem cells from their own bone marrow during routine coronary bypass surgery. The Bristol trial will test whether the stem cells will repair heart muscle cells damaged by the heart attack, by preventing late scar formation and hence impaired heart contraction. Dr. Raimondo Ascione [University of Bristol and colleagues at the Bristol Heart Institute (BHI)] have been awarded a grant of £210,000 from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) to conduct the clinical trial. Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director of the BHF, said: ”We hope that...

May 2007: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

Research Provides New Clues about How Adult Stem Cells Work Stem Cell Research Report Stem Cell Legislation Update  RESEARCH PROVIDES NEW CLUES ABOUT HOW ADULT STEM CELLS WORK. A new study shows that not only do stem cells from the patient’s own body readily repair all sorts of damaged tissue, they stimulate the growth and differentiation of existing stem cells. Dr. Darwin J. Prockop, Director of Tulane University’s Center for Gene Therapy says his research suggests multiple strategies to treat diseases using adult stem cells. Injected stem cells taken from bone marrow transfer mitochondrial DNA to existing local cells whose own mitochondria are inactive and stimulates those cells to start working. While scientists and doctors are seeing increasing success with treatments using adult stem cells, the actual mechanism by which the cells are able to repair and even replace damaged tissue has remained largely a mystery. It has been shown that even small numbers of stem cells taken from a patient’s own body, often from bone marrow, have been used successfully to treat Parkinson’s disease, kidney and liver disease, diabetes and various forms of heart disease and cancer. Speaking at the American Association of Anatomists in Washington April 19, Prockop described experiments in which human stem cells were injected into diabetic mice. The cells traveled to and engrafted themselves into the pancreas. They increased the production of insulin and lowered the mice’s blood sugar. The cells also engrafted themselves onto the kidneys and repaired the damage normally associated with diabetes. Related: Success Stories with Adult Stem Cells Coming in Almost Too Fast to Track http://www.lifesite.net/ldn/2005/jan/05012007.html [30April2007, By Hilary White,...

April 2007: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

Umbilical Cord Blood Storage Company Sees Growth Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Storage Resources Arkansas House Votes to Create Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Bank Scientists Claim They Discovered Molecule That Might Help Embryonic Stem Cells Grow US Senate Vote for Funding for Embryo-Destructive Stem Cell Research and Use of Frozen Human Embryos for Research Planned for 11 April 2007 UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD STORAGE COMPANY for Transplants Sees Enormous Growth in the amount of cord blood it has on hand. That after Congress and state legislatures have approved bills to promote awareness of using the embryonic stem cell research alternative. Cryobanks International's mission is to become the largest provider of cord blood stem cells for transplant and research purposes in the world and it's well on its way to fulfilling that goal.   With over 15,000 cord blood units processed and 9,000 listed on international registries for transplant, Cryobanks continues its push to help close the gap between patient needs and available resources of donated cord blood.   In recent years, cord blood transplants have become widely recognized as a safe, effective, and in many ways preferable, alternative to bone marrow transplant   According to Cryobanks' CEO, Dwight Brunoehler, over 35,000 American children and adults with life-threatening illnesses find themselves in need of a transplant each year. More than 150,000 people worldwide could be helped by cord blood transplants.   In a statement LifeNews.com received, Brunoehler said the company is committed to trying to use all cord blood it receives, including the 80% of donated units that do not meet the rigid transplant standards.   He said a variety of reasons including low...

Stem Cell Research Letter by Scientists (27Oct04)

October 27, 2004    Dear Senator Kerry,   Recently you have made the promotion of embryonic stem cell research, including the cloning of human embryos for research purposes, into a centerpiece of your campaign.  You have said you will make such research a “top priority” for government, academia and medicine (Los Angeles Times, 10/17/04).  You have even equated support for this research with respect for “science,” and said that science must be freed from “ideology” to produce miracle cures for numerous diseases.       As professionals trained in the life sciences we are alarmed at these statements.       First, your statements misrepresent science.  In itself, science is not a policy or a political program.  Science is a systematic method for developing and testing hypotheses about the physical world.  It does not “promise” miracle cures based on scanty evidence. When scientists make such assertions, they are acting as individuals, out of their own personal faith and hopes, not as the voice of "science".  If such scientists allow their individual faith in the future of embryonic stem cell research to be interpreted as a reliable prediction of the outcome of this research, they are acting irresponsibly.           Second, it is no mere “ideology” to be concerned about the possible misuse of humans in scientific research.  Federal bioethics advisory groups, serving under both Democratic and Republican presidents, have affirmed that the human embryo is a developing form of human life that deserves respect.  Indeed you have said that human life begins at conception, that fertilization produces a “human being.”  To equate concern for these beings with mere “ideology” is...

March 2007: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

Panel Finds Flawed Data in a Major Stem Cell Report   Stem Cells for Liver Cirrhosis Sweden Company Wants To Start First Stem Cell Research Factory Leading Scientist Charges Colleagues With “Misleading” Public NIH: Diabetes, Pancreatic Cancer, Making Blood, Parthenogenesis, Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells…  28Feb07 PANEL FINDS FLAWED DATA IN A MAJOR STEM CELL REPORT. An inquiry panel has found what it called “significantly flawed” data in a major stem cell paper published in Nature in 2002. The article, which claimed stem cells isolated from an adult could change into all the major tissue types of the body, was seized on by opponents of abortion as showing that embryonic stem cell research was unnecessary since adult stem cells could provide all the predicted benefits. The lead author of the article, Catherine Verfaillie, said 27Feb that she had sent a letter to Nature stating that the flawed data should not be relied on but that they did not affect the article’s conclusions. She said the journal was resubmitting the article to the original referees for them to make their own assessment. Problems with the article were first reported this month by New Scientist. Two writers for that magazine, Peter Aldhous and Eugenie Samuel Reich, noticed last year that a set of graphs in the Nature article was the same as that in an article by Dr. Verfaillie published in a different journal but ascribed to different mice. Timothy Mulcahy, vice president for research at the University of Minnesota, where Dr. Verfaillie had led the stem cell institute, said an inquiry panel was set up after Dr. Verfaillie asked the university to...

February 2007: Stem Cell Research

Adult Stem Cells Taken from Human Fat Tissue Used to Treat Heart Failure  Sweden Company Wants To Start First Stem Cell Research Factory Leading Scientist Charges Colleagues With “Misleading” Public British Stem Cell Researcher: Benefits of Therapeutic Cloning Oversold Rich Donors Fund California Stem Cell Research Panel During Lawsuit  Scientists See Potential In Amniotic Stem Cells Florida Gov Backs Measure Granting Funds to Non-Embryonic Research Only…     For more information about Stem Cell Research, click on Stem Cells in the left menu. Adult Stem Cells Taken from Human Fat Tissue Used to Treat Heart Failure. A heart attack victim was treated with stem cells taken from his own fat tissue in a groundbreaking new experiment taking place in Spain this week, Science Daily reported Feb.7.   In a collaborative effort, Dr. Francisco Fernandez-Aviles [Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine and Chief of Cardiology Service, Gregorio Marañón] and Dr. Perin [Director, New Interventional Cardiovascular Technology and Director of Stem Cell Center, Texas Heart Institute, St. Luke’s] have undertaken the attempt to use human adipose (fat) tissue as a source of adult stem cells to regenerate damaged heart muscle.   The cells were removed from adipose tissue in a procedure similar to that of liposuction. After processing, the stem cells were injected directly into the patient’s heart, targeting areas of damaged but still viable tissue.   “This is the first time we have used adipose-derived stem cells in humans. We had good results in our pre-clinical tests and we are excited about taking this research to the next level,” said Dr. Perin.   A similar study also being carried out at the Texas Heart Institute,...

January 2007: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

British Scientist Uses Adult Stem Cell Research to Treat Back Pain Australia Lawmakers Upset Over Human Cloning Vote  BRITISH SCIENTIST USES ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH TO TREAT BACK PAIN.   A University of Manchester researcher has developed a treatment for lower back pain using the patient's own stem cells, which could replace the use of strong painkillers or surgery. Those options don't ultimate addresses the underlying cause of back pain in many patients. Dr. Stephen Richardson, of the University's Division of Regenerative Medicine in the School of Medicine (FMHS), has developed the treatment in collaboration with German biotechnology company Arthrokinetics and internationally renowned spinal surgeons. Richardson is hoping to enter pre-clinical trials next year (2007). Low back pain affects a large proportion of the adult population at some point in their lives and in many of these cases it is persistent, eventually leading to debilitating pain. Currently, treatments address the symptoms — mainly pain — using a combination of painkillers, physiotherapy or surgery, removing tissue to relieve the pain or fusing the vertebrae above and below the painful disc. None of these options is ideal as they only treat the symptoms, not the cause, and are of limited long-term success. The treatment Dr. Richardson is developing uses a cell-based tissue engineering approach to regenerate the intervertebral disc (IVD) at the affected level. This is achieved through the combination of the patients' own mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and a naturally occurring collagen gel that can be implanted through a minimally-invasive surgical technique. MSCs are a population of progenitor cells found in the bone marrow of adults which can differentiate into many...

December 2006: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

Source Of Multipotent Adult Stem Cells Discovered In Human Hair Follicles To view Headlines from past months, click "Current Headlines" in the left menu, and then click Stem Cells or other topics. SOURCE OF MULTIPOTENT ADULT STEM CELLS DISCOVERED IN HUMAN HAIR FOLLICLES. The stem cells isolated from scalp tissue can be coaxed into a variety of cell types needed to replace damaged tissue in the heart, muscle, and brain. These stem cells can also be harvested with simple procedures and don’t require the destruction of a human embryo. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine isolated a new source of adult stem cells that appear to have the potential to differentiate into several cell types. If their approach to growing these cells can be scaled up and proves to be safe and effective in animal and human studies, it could one day provide the tissue needed by an individual for treating a host of disorders, including peripheral nerve disease, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. “We are very excited about this new source of adult stem cells that has the potential for a variety of applications,” says senior author Xiaowei (George) Xu, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology. “A number of reports have pointed to the fact that adult stem cells may be more flexible in what they become than previously thought, so we decided to look in the hair follicle bulge, a niche for these cells.” Xu and colleagues report their findings in the July06 issue of the American Journal of Pathology. Hair follicles are well known to be a source for adult stem cells. The...

Transplanted Fetal Cells Fail to Treat Parkinson's Disease, Lead to Serious Side Effects (12/02)

A second study of transplanted fetal cells has failed to show a therapeutic benefit in Parkinson's disease patients and produced serious side effects in some patients, the Wall Street Journal reports. The findings are "a blow" to researchers who had thought that transplants of brain tissue from aborted fetuses could stem the effects of the disease. For the study, which involved 34 participants, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and University of South Florida researchers infused brain tissue from up to eight aborted fetuses, ranging from six to nine weeks old, into 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. Brain scans of the participants indicated that the transplanted cells functioned "normally," but researchers were unable to "find any measurable improvement on tests of motor and other skills," according to the Journal. In addition, the "most severe setback" was side effects that included uncontrolled limb movement in 13 patients. Three patients experienced such severe side effects that they required additional surgeries to control them. The study — the second of two federally funded studies to examine if fetal cells can repair brain tissue in Parkinson's patients — could lead to a "winding down" for future fetal-cell transplants, the Journal reports. Anthony Lang, a Parkinson's expert at Toronto Western Hospital in Canada, said, "This is a surprising result that forces reconsideration of transplantation without a great deal more research." The study could also have implications for embryonic stem cell research, which has recently "upstaged both politically and scientifically" research using fetal cells. Some researchers consider stem cells "more versatile" than fetal cells, according to the Journal (Regalado, Wall Street Journal, 12/3). President Bush in...

November 2006: Stem Cell & Cloning Research

The Stem Cell Rat Race Adult Stem Cells Used to Treat Emergency Heart Attack Victims Adult Stem Cell Research in China Helps Parkinson's Patient from Hawaii Biologists Want To Drop the Word 'Cloning' THE STEM CELL RAT RACE. In pursuit of cures, scientists have continued to press for the fastest routes–ignoring every ethical caution sign in their path. But news from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests that researchers are now running into lethal roadblocks. Steven Goldman, a neurology professor at the Center, found that using human embryonic stem cells in the brains of Parkinson's patients may cause deadly tumors. In the latest journal Nature Medicine, he wrote that his team injected human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into rat brains to cure symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease. While the cells helped to stabilize the disorder, they also caused growths that ultimately killed the rats. In Dr. Goldman's words, "The behavioral data validate the utility of the approach. But it also raises a cautionary flag and says we are not ready for prime time yet." [Wash. Post] He conceded that considerably more research would need to be done to determine whether the tumor problems could ever be overcome. Parkinson's is a disease where dopamine-releasing cells in the brain die out, which leads to muscle dysfunction and can eventually cause paralysis. The goal of stem cell research in Parkinson's is to replace the dead cells with stem cells that form into new dopamine cells. Goldman's team used human embryonic stem cells obtained by killing days-old unborn human embryos that were grown in a special chemical used to coax them into becoming...

October 2006: Stem Cell Research

Biotech Firms Want Federal $$ for Dubious Embryonic Stem Cell Research Method Hundreds of MO People Rally in Kansas City Against Human Cloning Adult Stem Cell Research Helps Children With Brain Tumors Adult Stem Cell Research Provides Hope for Kidney & Liver Patients Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Research Produces Insulin for Diabetics Gene Therapy Successfully Treats Cancer TX Umbilical Cord Blood Bank Lacks Donations Stroke Damage Reduced with Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells Thalassemia Cured With Placental Cells Multiple Studies: Adult Stem Cells Can Mimic Embryonic Stem Cells – No need to Kill Human Embryos Adult Stem Cell Industry Growing BIOTECH FIRMS WANT GOVT $ FOR DUBIOUS EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH METHOD. Two leading biotech firms want the federal government to pay to distribute embryonic stem cells obtained through a dubious new method they claim does not destroy human life. However, the method was proven false in previous weeks after a media explosion claimed it solved ethics problems. California-based Advanced Cell Technology (ACT) and WiCell Research Institute [Wisconsin company] plan to distribute new embryonic stem cell lines they say can be obtained without destroying human life. The cell lines would be produced with the Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) technique ACT outlined in a recent paper in the scientific journal Nature. However, Nature was forced to revise press statements about the article that made it appear the technique did not destroy unborn children. Instead, all 16 of the human embryos involved in the research were destroyed and the technique remains hypothetical. None of the 16 embryos involved in the study by medical director Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology (ACT)...

September 2006: Stem Cells & Cloning

South Africa Duo Made Fortune Selling Fake Stem Cell Treatments USA Leads World In Stem Cell Research Despite Embryo-Destructive Funding Limits  Australia Retains Ban on Human Cloning Iran Scientists Clone Sheep, Dies Minutes after Birth Adult Mouse Muscle Stem Cells Found Capable of Long-Term Self-Renewal Adult Stem Cell Research Companies Deemed Better Investment   U.S. LEADS WORLD IN STEM CELL RESEARCH DESPITE EMBRYONIC FUNDING LIMITS. Advocates of embryonic stem cell research have complained saying the United States is lagging behind in the field of stem cell research because of limits on funding embryonic stem cell research with taxpayer dollars. A new list of the top stem cell research labs in the world shows otherwise. The Ion Channel Media Group, a private biotechnology and advertising firm, has released a list of the top stem cell research laboratories in the world. The ranking was compiled using the publication and citation history of nearly 5000 stem cell research labs. The survey found that most of the laboratories in the top 25 are from the USA, despite limits on using taxpayer funds to pay for any new embryonic stem cell research. All of the top 8 stem cell research labs hail from the U.S., including the #1 center, Irving Weissman's lab at Stanford. Catherine Verfaillie's laboratory [Univ of MN] earned the number two spot based upon her work with adult stem cells derived from bone marrow. The Whitehead Institute in Massachusetts came third, the Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center was fourth and the Walther Oncology Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine was fifth. Hesketh, the CEO of Ion Channel Media...

August 2006: Cloning & Stem Cell Research

Company Opens First Stem Cell Bank for Adult Stem Cells From Baby Teeth  South Korea Turns to Adult Stem Cells Adult Stem Cells from Adipose (Fat) Tissue Used to Repair Damage of Breast Surgery White House Softens Tone on Embryo Use EU Reaches Compromise on Embryonic Stem Cell Research Fund Scientists Grow Sperm from Embryo-Destructive Stem Cell Research Adult Stem Cell Research Benefits Spinal Cord Patients Patent Debate Stalling Embryo-Destructive Stem Cell Research Concerns Growing that Some Researchers Will Stop at Nothing in the  Lab COMPANY OPENS FIRST STEM CELL BANK FOR ADULT STEM CELLS FROM BABY TEETH. Children who lose their teeth could gain more than just a dollar if they give them to Austin, Texas-based startup company BioEDEN Inc [http://www.bioeden.com/]. The company has opened up the first stem cell bank dedicated to stem cells harvested from baby teeth. The cells form a child's tooth could one day be used to treat the child herself to help with a debilitating disease or condition. Right now, scientists have only been able to use the teeth stem cells to create new teeth for others broken by accidents, but they may have other potential uses as scientists examine them over the coming years. "I think these cells have more therapeutic potential than we realize," BioEDEN spokeswoman Robin Remaley said. "We can't prove it, but we believe it." BioEDEN touts its work as an ethical alternative to embryonic stem cell research. The month-old company's business model is based on a 2003 study by scientists from the National Institutes of Health, who found baby teeth contained stem cells that appeared capable of becoming a...