Responses – Stem Cell Collection, Acquisition & Research

Scientists Say Aborted Babies are ‘Essential for Research’, Yet No One Has Ever Been Cured

[Comment: Although the mainstream media continues to downplay or ignore the issue, the defense of using aborted babies’ body parts is unraveling. N. Valko RN, 16 Aug 2015] Scientists Say Aborted Babies are “Essential for Research,” Yet No One Has Ever Been Cured With the exposure of Planned Parenthood’s activities in procuring aborted babies for scientists, the media is buying into the lie that this is “life-saving” research. In a recent article picked up by the AP and published in US News, the hysterics were evidenced by the headlines “Amid uproar over anti-abortion videos scientists say fetal tissue essential for research”. The article starts out sounding like talking points for Planned Parenthood’s Cecile Richards by quoting from Stanford University spokesperson Lisa Lapin: “If researchers are unable to work with fetal tissue, there is a huge list of diseases for which researchers would move much more slowly, rather than quickly, to find their cause and how they can be cured.” Not only has there never been a cure for any disease whatsoever using aborted fetal material, the very next sentence demonstrates what’s really behind their motives. “From 2011 through 2014 alone, 97 research institutions – mostly universities and hospitals – received a total of $280 million in federal grants for fetal tissue research from the National Institutes of Health.” Cha-ching! Looks like government defunding of Planned Parenthood is only the tip of the iceberg, isn’t it? Next the article notes that vaccines for hepatitis A, German measles, chickenpox and rabies were developed using cell lines grown from tissue from elective abortions. “What they fail to admit is that with the...

Cord Blood Stem Cell Medical Advances, Treatments & Registeries

Tremendous growth credited to medical advances in Umbilical Cord Blood and global partnerships: NMDP Celebrates 30,000 Transplants Minneapolis — December 11, 2007 The number of patients receiving a bone marrow or cord blood transplant through the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) surged past 30,000 early this month. Advances in transplant medicine, especially in cord blood, and increased international relationships have made transplantation an option for more patients than ever before. In the past 16 months alone, the NMDP facilitated about 5,000 transplants. This tremendous growth is noteworthy, considering it took 10 years to achieve the first 6,000 bone marrow transplants. “The day on which the 30,000th transplant occurred is representative of the current scope of the NMDP’s work: 19 transplants were facilitated in nine states, six countries and four continents,” said Jeffrey W. Chell, M.D., NMDP chief executive officer. “The NMDP is truly part of a global network, and we look forward to continuing our mission as we strive to serve all patients in need.” Cord blood contributes to exponential growth Today, advances in cord blood transplantation are making it possible to meet the needs of more seriously ill patients, and especially those from diverse racial and ethnic communities. Since 2004, the number of cord blood transplants facilitated by the NMDP has nearly doubled each year. This year (2007), one in five transplants (20%) facilitated by the NMDP used cord blood. The NMDP expects these numbers to continue to grow, providing increased access to cord blood for any patient who needs a transplant. Patients need global collaboration Each year, more than 10,000 Americans are diagnosed with life-threatening diseases that...

History of Umbilical Cord Blood Research

In 1988, physicians performed the first umbilical cord blood transplant on a 6-year-old boy with Fanconi anemia using a cord blood unit from an HLA-matched sibling. The success of this and subsequent cord blood transplants led to the establishment of cord blood banks that collect, process, tissue type and cryopreserve cord blood units (CBUs) for use in blood cell transplantation. Cord blood is being researched as an alternative cell source for hematopoietic reconstitution where an allogeneic transplant may be indicated. [http://www.marrow.org/DONOR/Donation_Transplant_Process/The_Donation_Procedure/CB_Donation/Advanced/index.html] The blood in the umbilical cord and placenta is unique because it contains large numbers of blood-forming cells. The blood-forming cells from cord blood are being studied under research protocols as a new method for treating patients with life-threatening diseases. Blood-forming cells to treat these patients can come from donated bone marrow or peripheral (circulating) blood or cord blood.   Although some patients have a family member who can donate cells, 70% of patients will not find a matching donor in their family. Cord blood donations can give more patients hope of finding a match.   Cord Blood Donation Process When a mother decides to donate her child's umbilical cord blood: She looks for a cord blood bank in her community. (Because cord blood banking is relatively new, many communities do not have a cord blood bank.) The cord blood bank asks the mother to complete a consent form and health history questionnaire and give a small blood sample. The cord blood is collected after the baby's birth. Doctors search the NMDP Registry of donors and cord blood units to find a match for their patients who need...

"Don't Throw It Away!"

The saving of the umbilical cord blood and the cryopreservation of the stem cells that are abundant in the cord blood represents one of the greatest recycling programs in the history of mankind. In the past, the umbilical cord blood/placenta blood was considered medical waste and disposed of after the birth of a newborn. Today, the umbilical cord blood is considered a life saving source of stem cells that are a 100 percent biological match to the newborn. In addition, the collection of the cord blood offers absolutely no risk to either the mother or to the newborn. "Don't throw it away" is an ICBS slogan that was coined by one of the ICBS founders, Curtis L. Cetrulo, M.D. and refers to the choices that couples have when deciding what to do with this valuable resource. The choices include: discarding the blood, donating the specimen to a public cord blood bank to help someone in need of a stem cell transplant, or banking the specimen with a private cord blood bank for the child that has just been born or for his/her family. Discarding the cord blood at the time of birth as is commonly done in 99 percent of all deliveries and makes no sense whatsoever. Each year approximately 9000 patients are diagnosed with diseases that can be treated with stem cells and nearly 70 percent of those in need of a stem cell transplant are unable to find a match. Often times even if a match can be located it is after many months and the disease has progressed to a point of no return. For these...

Babies For Life Foundation Links New Mothers, Researchers, and Patients in Need

Foundation Continues Pursuit Of Ethical Stem Cell Use…Babies for Life Foundation…(BFL- www.babiesforlife.org) collects donations of this “diamond” mine of stem cell–rich umbilical cord blood, linking new mothers, researchers and patients in need. For the past five years Dr. Gerry Sotomayor of BFL has collected umbilical cord blood from newborns, sending it to cord blood public registries to help patients worldwide with the 65 diseases now successfully treated with umbilical cord adult stem cells—not to mention the at least 97 diseases that can be treated or cured by the various types of adult stem cells found throughout the body. The foundation, established by Sotomayor, has developed a systematic way to collect units at 10 participating Georgia hospitals from women who agree to donate cord blood at no risk to themselves or their babies, thus facilitating a newborn’s first act of charity…each birth provides 1.5-2.5 million cord blood stem cells. These and other adult stem cells are regenerative, unspecialized cells that are able to differentiate into various specialized cells that form tissues. “It’s the byproduct of a delivery that can be utilized to give life to someone else,” said Sotomayor. Through the BFL nonprofit organization, this obstetrician-gynecologist from Puerto Rico is “developing relations with several labs” and is also seeking funding in hopes of helping set up a public storage facility at the Medical College of Georgia. Sotomayor is eager to collaborate with companies and universities involved in various types of research on these virile adult stem cells—hoping one day to replace the embryonic stem cell research that involves destroying embryos to extract just a small number of stem cells to...

Where can I Donate Umbilical Cord Blood to Save the Stem Cells?

 http://www.marrow.org/DONOR/index.html#cb Are you interested in donating your baby’s umbilical cord blood? Any woman who is at least 18 years old (16 in some locations), is in good general health and lives in a community where cord blood donation is available may be able to donate her baby’s umbilical cord blood. Even if your community does not have a cord blood bank, many blood banks now use shipping companies to quickly ship the blood from your hospital to the cord blood bank. If you have already donated your baby’s umbilical cord blood, we thank you for your donation. To find out more about how the donated cord blood might be used, read about cord blood transplants or read the real life story of a cord blood transplant recipient.   http://www.marrow.org/DONOR/index.html#cb Do you have questions about the donation process? Read a description of the cord blood donation process. Read answers to common questions in the Cord Blood FAQs.  http://www.marrow.org/DONOR/index.html#cb Last Updated: March 2006 Another organization that helps mothers Easily Save Their Babies’ Cord Blood is…  http://www.babiesforlife.org/howtodonate.asp   To read one mother’s journal about her experience with cord blood donation, click here.   How are umbilical cord stem cells obtained for transplantation? Stem cells also may be retrieved from umbilical cord blood. For this to occur, the mother must contact a cord blood bank before the baby’s birth. The cord blood bank may request that she complete a questionnaire and give a small blood sample. Cord blood banks may be public or commercial. Public cord blood banks accept donations of cord blood and may provide the donated stem cells to another matched individual in...

Umbilical Cord Blood Banks – Private and Public – for Future Stem Cell Use

BENEFITS OF PUBLIC / PRIVATE UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD BANKS. When an infant is born, blood from the umbilical cord that would otherwise be discarded contains stem cells that can be frozen and stored, and those cells can be used later for stem cell transplants to treat illnesses such as leukemia or sickle cell anemia. In 2000, about 1,000 infants in the Chicago area had their umbilical cord blood stored in either a public or private bank. Public and private cord blood banks differ in several ways. Private banks charged an initial fee and an annual fee to store the blood. With private banks, parents can control how and if the blood will be used, and generally stem cells are only accessed if the child or a family member needs a transplant at a later time. Public cord blood banks harvest and store umbilical cord blood for free, but the blood can then be accessed by any suitable recipient who is in need of it. It is likely that the blood "will still be there" if it is ever needed by the family in the future. The public cord blood bank in Chicago has collected more than 2,000 units of cord blood that are tissue-typed and listed in the National Marrow Donor Program database, so that the stem cells are available for use nationwide by any needy recipient with a tissue match [Condor, Chicago Tribune, 10/28; Kaiser Daily Reproductive Health Report, 30Oct01] Ethical Provision Of Stem Cells Bank a New Baby’s Life-Saving Cord Blood – less than 100cc of frozen blood taken from the umbilical cord of a newborn baby...

Illinois Law: Families Can Donate Umbilical Cord Blood (10/04)

In their first moments after birth, babies across Illinois are making a donation that could save the life of another child or adult. A new law that took effect in 1/04 makes Illinois the first state to routinely ask pregnant women if they would like to donate the blood from their baby’s umbilical cord for the valuable stem cells it contains. Before, the umbilical-cord blood was thrown away as medical waste… For an easy-to-understand explanation of stem cells, click here. Scientists can use the cord blood to make many different types of cells in the body — to carry oxygen, fight disease and help stop bleeding. Women who deliver babies at the Trinity Birth Center or Illini Birth Center are being asked, toward the end of their pregnancy, to consider making the donation. They are asked before their 35th week to make a decision about whether they want to donate, and are then sent a kit to take with them to the hospital. “That’s been a state directive,”said Candy Talley, nurse manager/ maternal-child at Illini. “All the hospitals that deliver babies in the state of Illinois should be doing that.” Non-embryonic Stem Cells, such as the umbilical cord blood stem cells, can be used to treat a wide range of diseases, including leukemias, lymphomas, immune-system disorders and inherited metabolic diseases. State Rep. David R. Leitch, R-Peoria, heard a presentation about the benefits of non-embryonic stem cells and worked to make Illinois the first state to ask women if they want to donate. Most of the Illinois donations go to Cryobank International, a Florida cord bank that gets about 40 donations...

Umbilical Cord Blood Banks: Ethical Provision of Stem Cells

Ethical Provision Of Stem Cells  Bank a New Baby’s Life-Saving Cord Blood – less than 100cc of frozen blood taken from the umbilical cord of a newborn baby contains the stem cells that could not only save the life of the baby during his lifetime, but could also save the life of a close family member. [Pioneer Press, 5/23/02] Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells may be saved in private or public banks. The Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act, passed and signed into law in December 2005 has already greatly expanded adult and cord blood stem cell research and patient treatments. The National Marrow Donor Program maintains a Web page on donating cord blood at http://www.marrow.org/NMDP/cord_blood_bank_list.html, and International Cord Blood Society  http://www.cordblood.org/public/insights   http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/faqs.asp There are a growing number of cord blood banking and research facilities: The Cord Blood Donor Fdn – www.cordblooddonor.org The Cord Blood Registry – www.cordblood.com International Cord Blood Society — www.cordblood.org National Marrow Donor Program — www.marrow.org  Bone Marrow Foundation — www.bonemarrow.org Viacord – www.viacord.com Coalition of Americans for Ethical Research – www.stemcellresearch.org ** ** This website is not recommending these institutions, but simply making you aware of their existence so that you can do your own research and reach your own conclusions. [This list is provided at this website for your information; as noted above, these institutions are not recommended by this website, but are listed simply to note their existence.] www.stemcellresearch.org/petition www.grassfire.net/103/stemcell.asp. Information to send to your legislators or other individuals can be found at www.stemcellresearch.org.   CONGRESS PASSES $300 MILLION+ CORD BLOOD STEM CELL BILL – PRES BUSH SIGNS. The Smith-Stupak bill passed the...