Children Of Post-Abortive Mothers Have More Behavioral Problems, Study Shows (JCPP,9/2002)

A study published in the  Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry found that children whose mothers have a history of abortion tend to have less emotional support at home and more behavioral problems than children whose mothers have not had abortions. [click here for actual study] Researchers examined behavior and the quality of the home environment for 4,844 children. The study used data collected in 1992 by the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a survey conducted by the Center for Human Resource Research at Ohio State University and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor. “The results of our study showed that among first-born children, maternal history of abortion was associated with lower emotional support in the home among children ages one to four, and more behavioral problems among five- to nine-year-olds,” said Dr. Priscilla Coleman, a professor at Bowling Green State University and the lead author of the study. “This held true even after controlling for maternal age, education, family income, the number of children in the home and maternal depression.” Coleman noted that although the results of the study were probably unprecedented, “they were not all that surprising when considered in light of previous research linking unresolved grief associated with other forms of perinatal loss, such as miscarriage and stillbirth, to compromised parenting.” Many women opt for abortion as the result of adverse circumstances or pressure from others, she said, making the decision difficult to cope with if the woman was emotionally attached to the fetus or desired to carry the pregnancy to term. “An abortion could become psychologically similar to other forms of pregnancy loss in...

Women who Abort (SMJ,8/2002)

A study published in the 8/2002 issue of the Southern Medical Journal reveals that women who have abortions are at significantly higher risk of death than women who give birth, both in the short- and long-term, and across socioeconomic boundaries. Compared to delivering women, women who abort have an elevated risk of death from all causes that persists for at least 8 years. Projected on the national population, this effect may contribute to 2000-5000 additional deaths among women each year. [Southern Medical Journal study reported in 3/03 Lifelines; Elliot Inst 02 Year End Report] It appears that the death rate following abortion is actually much higher than previously known. Researchers examined death records linked to Medi-Cal payments for births and abortions in 1989 for approximately 173,270 low income Californian women. The study compared women whose history of pregnancy outcomes fell into five different categories. The delivery-only group had the fewest deaths and the abortion-only group had the most deaths. They discovered that women who had abortions were almost twice as likely to die in the following two years and that the elevated mortality rate of aborting women persisted over at least eight years (1989-1997). The authors suggest that delivering a child has a protective effect on women. This finding contradicts the widely accepted opinion that abortion is safer than childbirth. During the eight year period studied, women who aborted had a significantly higher age-adjusted risk of death from all causes (1.62). They had a 154 percent higher risk of death from suicide (2.54), an 82 percent higher risk of death from accidents (1.82), and a 44 percent higher risk...

Women's/Teens' Mental Health Declines After Abortion (APS,6/2000)

Two Studies –Women who undergo abortions are at greater risk for mental health problems in subsequent years, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Society (APS) held 6/00 in FL. The study looked at CA women who received state funded medical care and who either had an abortion or gave birth in 1989. Researchers examined the women's medical records for up to six years afterwards and found that women who had undergone abortions had significantly higher mental health claims than women who had given birth. Women who had abortions were more than twice as likely to have 2 – 9 treatments for mental health as women who carried to term. According to the authors, Dr. Priscilla Coleman, a psychology professor at the University of the South and Dr David Reardon, director of the Elliot Institute, "the data presented in this report suggest that when compared to birth, abortion is associated with a significantly greater risk for psychological disturbance among low income women." Reardon said "the few long-term studies that have been done show that many women's problems don't start cropping up until at least a year or so after the abortion, often when they reach the expected due date of the child or the anniversary of the abortion itself. By examining a larger period of time, this study was able to get a broader look at the association between abortion and subsequent mental health problems."   Yet another new study that presented at the APS conference by researchers from the University at Albany in New York found that teens who had children...