A Timeline: Abortion-On-Demand in the USA

KEY ROLE OF LIFE-AFFIRMING STATE LAWS IN THE SUBSTANTIAL DECLINE OF  ABORTION NUMBERS DURING THE 1990s  [research by Harvard-MIT Data Center post-doctoral fellow M. J. New, publ. by the Heritage Foundation (www.heritage.org)] http://www.heritage.org/Research/Family/CDA04-01.cfm 1859. The American Medical Association condemns abortion. 1860s Said to be the beginning of a social and political birth control movement. 1873. Comstock law is passed (a federal law agianst the manufacture, sale, or possession of contraceptives in the District of Columbia and federal territories; also forbade the mailing of contraceptives or advertisements for them). 1875. Every state in the U.S. has adopted laws banning abortion. 1917. Margaret Sanger forms the Birth Control League (now Planned Parenthood) to promote contraception and abortion, and begins a push for the church to accept contraception. 1920. Lambeth Conference at which Anglican Church leaders acknowledged the contraception debate but responded, “We utter an emphatic warning against the use of unnatural means for the avoidance of conception.” 1930. Lambeth Conference at which the acceptance of birth control makes its way into the church. A major victory for Sanger and her cohorts. 1950s Alfred Kinsey’s fraudulent sex reports help define children as sexual from birth. Push to change state laws which would eventually allow and promote sexually explicit sex education programs in public schools. 1961. The National Council of Churches gives its backing to unnatural forms of birth control. 1965. Griswold v. Connecticut sounds the death knell for all anti-contraception legislation in the U.S. The Supreme Court invented a doctrine of privacy to permit the use of birth control. 1967. Colorado becomes the first state to allow abortion for cases of rape,...