Abortion History Linked to Bipolar Disorders (Bibliography 2003-2015)

… And the Ongoing Cover-up Women with a history of abortion are three times more likely to suffer from bipolar disorders, according to a new study published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. The researchers’ findings were based on a comparison of reproductive histories of women treated for bipolar disorders with a control group of similar women without a history of bipolar disorders. They found that 42.4 percent of the women with bipolar disorders had a history of abortion compared to only 13.5 percent of the control group. There was no significant difference in pregnancy rates or use of contraceptives.[1] These findings are consistent with a 2003 record linkage study of 56,741 low income women in California that Reardon conducted with his colleagues. In that study it was found that the rate of first-time psychiatric admissions for bipolar disorders was three times higher after abortion compared to childbirth during the four years following the pregnancy.[2] Unfortunately, additional research into the link between abortion and bipolar disorders is often obstructed by ideological considerations. For example, a 2012 recent record linkage study of 120,378 Danish women examining risk of bipolar disorders following childbirth conspicuously excluded any analyses related to bipolar disorders following other pregnancy outcomes, specifically abortion or miscarriage, even though this data was available to the researchers.[3] Indeed, when [the author] pointed this omission out in a letter published by the journal and asked for publication of the results of bipolar disorders associated with abortion, the lead author, Trine Munk-Olsen, simply refused the request. Burying the Truth Why would she refuse? There are only a few possibilities. First, she may...

Treatment of Depression During Pregnancy Affects Babies (2/05)

In the wake of a yearlong debate over the risks of antidepressants to minors, an analysis of World Health Organization medical records has found that infants whose mothers took the drugs while pregnant may suffer withdrawal symptoms. The study challenges the assurances that many doctors have long given pregnant women with depression that taking the drugs would not affect their babies. But experts said that the study, appearing 4Feb05 in the journal Lancet, was not definitive and must be weighed against the benefits of drug treatment. Untreated maternal depression can also harm a developing fetus, the experts said, and may lead to lasting childhood problems; all of the infants in the study recovered completely from withdrawal symptoms within 24 hours. “This study is important in that it gives us a red flag that babies exposed to antidepressants during pregnancy should be closely observed, and may go through unusual behaviors at first,” said Dr. Timothy Oberlander, a developmental pediatrician at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Oberlander was not involved in the research and does not conduct research or act as a consultant for pharmaceutical companies. Some 10% – 15% of women suffer bouts of depression during the hormonal chaos of pregnancy, and about a quarter of those women get antidepressant treatment, doctors estimate, usually with drugs like Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft. If not treated, these women may also be at increased risk of postpartum depression, a devastating disorder that not only clouds the relationship between mother and child but can also interfere with the child’s social development, according to Dr. Janet DiPietro [prof, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health]....