Nov-Sept 2007: Authentic Abstinence Education

Abstinence Resources NEW! PP & Oral Sex NEW! The Rise of the Good Girl / Bringing Back Purity NEW! The Effect of Sexual Abstinence on Educational Attainment  Interview with Chaste South African Swimming Champ Abstinence Education Legislation Update (update 1 Nov 07) 10 Great Dates CBAE & Title V  A Call to Let Girls BE Girls  Money Grows on Family Planning Trees…  RESOURCES  CONCERNED PARENTS REPORT. As promoters of chastity and abstinence as the only way to lower or eliminate the risk of both teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, Concerned Parents Report searches for studies in six areas: "Understanding Your Teen," "What's Working With Teens," "Today's Risky Lifestyle Behavior," "Today's Danger with Sexually Transmitted Infections/Diseases," "Why Contraception is Not the Answer," and "Why Abortion is Not the Answer to a Teen Pregnancy." Their website is a good place to start when researching these issues. Go to http://concernedparents.com/index.htm. [Abstinence Clearinghouse Email Updates, 31Oct07]   JUST SAY YES: THE WORLD PREMIER OF “LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP” Three years ago, Just Say YES envisioned On October 16, 2007, a $600,000 dream became reality as the World Premier of “Look Before You Leap,” a show that would engage and reach teens in their own multimedia language, at the Frontiers of Flight Museum in Dallas, Texas. A skydiving theme was used to portray the urgency of developing a plan prior to making a decision that could significantly impact one’s life. Saving sexual activity for marriage was emphasized as the safest, healthiest way to avoid destructive risks one would regret forever. Since the premier, this state-of-the-art multimedia program has been shown in Dallas, TX...

Safe Sex (APFLI brochure)

Physicians Series    SAFE SEX   You’ve probably heard a lot of talk about “safe sex” and it may sound great! Here are some medical facts about condoms and “safe sex.” According to a report issued in July 2001 by the National Institutes of Health (NH), there is NO scientific evidence that condoms prevent the transmission of 98% of eight major sexually-transmitted diseases. Condoms were NOT found to provide universal protection against HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, chancroid, trichomoniasis, genital herpes or Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Researchers found only two areas of limited condom effectiveness: heterosexual transmission of HIV (only 0.03% of all annual STD cases) and female-to-male transmission of gonorrhea (2% of all STDs occurring annually in the US). (Gonorrhea is a curable, bacterial disease.) The Executive Panel concluded that condoms “could reduce the risk of gonorrhea,” but only “for men.”  The Panel and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) also recognize that condoms do not stop HPV infection. An estimated 20 million Americans are currently infected with genital HPV (warts). HPV is a major cause of nearly all cervical cancer and has also been linked to penile, prostate, anal and oral cancer. While not everyone infected with HPV will develop cancer, every year 15,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed and 5,000 women die from the disease. Hundreds of thousands of other women will be diagnosed and treated for pre-cancerous conditions. If these “real people” were questioned, it may very well be found that they could provide evidence of the inadequacies of condoms in their “real situations”. . . For the remaining five diseases, the Panel noted that...

Physicians Series Brochure: Male Puberty

What’s going on? Why am I changing? What am I feeling? What is puberty? Why am I growing hair everywhere? What is happening to me? Suddenly, changes are beginning to take place in you and in your friends. These changes are occurring faster in some of you than in others. It can seem confusing and even embarrassing if you don’t understand it all. Sometimes, you feel really ignorant because you don’t seem to know as much about these changes as your friends do. You may find, however, that they really don’t know any more than you do; they’re just trying to act like they do. This brochure will try to answer your questions about your bodily changes and about your emotional ups and downs in a simple, but medically correct way. Puberty is the time in your life when you stop being a little boy and begin to mature physically, emotionally, and intellectually into a man. Puberty is part of life. Every person experiences it — even girls! Puberty is an exciting phase of your life. As you begin to understand your body’s activities and the reasons for all these changes, you will be amazed at the incredible way your body works! Your emotions may even begin to change from one moment to the next. You may feel great one day and very depressed the next. Don’t worry! The hormones causing your physical changes are rushing through your body affecting your emotions as well. These feelings are very normal, and so are you! Feeling sad or upset, or even crying occasionally helps you to become a fully developed, compassionate...

Physicians Series Brochure: Female Puberty

What’s going on? Why am I changing? What is puberty? What is this “period” all about? What is happening to my body? Suddenly, changes are beginning to take place in you and in your friends. It can seem confusing and embarrassing if you don’t understand it all. This brochure will try to answer your questions about these changes and feelings in simple, medical terms. Puberty is the time in your life when you stop being a little girl and begin to mature physically, emotionally, and intellectually into a woman. Puberty is part of life. Every person experiences it — even boys! Puberty is an exciting phase of your life! As you begin to understand your body’s activities and the reasons for all these changes, you will be amazed at the incredible way your body works! Your emotions may change from moment to moment. You may feel happy and on a cloud one day and under a cloud the next! You may start crying at the slightest word or look. Don’t worry! The hormones causing your physical changes are rushing through your body affecting your emotions as well. You are very normal! Eventually your body will adjust to the changes and you will feel more relaxed. Your Reproductive System Your female reproductive system is where many changes occur each day of your menstrual cycle. Your female reproductive organs include two ovaries, two Fallopian tubes, the uterus, and the vagina. The ovaries, tubes, and uterus are located in the lower abdominal region called the pelvis. The base of the uterus is the cervix, a doughnut-shaped muscle. Below the cervix is the...