Abortion – Contraception Linked: Quotes from Drug Agencies & Researchers

The Link Between Contraceptives and Abortion Some question the assertion by others that hormonal birth control substances (i.e. birth control pills, implansts like Norplant, Implanon, and injectables like Depo-Provera) can trigger a "post-fertilization effect" which may be an abortifacient mechanism, and as such are sometimes responsible for causing a newly formed embryo to be aborted at 6-10 days after fertilization. This is referred to as a “chemical abortion”.      There is a compelling consensus among birth control manufacturers, population control advocates, and the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) that chemical abortions are taking place with the use of contraceptives. We would like to quote from a few of their statements.     In 1976, the FDA mandated that physician and patient package inserts accompany the distribution of the Pill. The agency’s proposed warning read: “…oral contraceptives are of two types. The most common…is a combination of an estrogen and a progestin, the two kinds of female hormones…this kind of oral contraceptive works principally by preventing release of an egg from the ovary. The second type of oral contraceptive, often called the mini-pill, contains only a progestin. It works, in part, by preventing release of an egg from the ovary, but also by keeping sperm from reaching the egg and making the uterus (womb) less receptive to any fertilized egg that reaches it.” (emphasis added) (Federal Register, 7Dec76, page 53640). Physician package inserts for the Pill are still required today and they still use language that indicates the Pill, Depo-Provera and Norplant inhibit implantation.      Eugenicist and population control zealot, Margaret Sanger, was the founder of Planned Parenthood. According to Gregory Pincus, co-developer of...

Access to Contraceptives Does Not Stop Unplanned Pregnancies, Abortion Statistics (AGI) & Comments

A report form the Alan Guttmacher Institute provides wide ranging statistics and demographic information on women who had abortions. In addition to reporting that abortion numbers continued to drop in 2001 and 2002, the report contains findings that may bolster arguments made by social conservatives on several different issues, including one finding that would indicate contraceptive use may not stop unplanned pregnancies. The Alan Guttmacher Institute is the research arm of Planned Parenthood and openly supports abortion and widespread access to contraceptives. The report placed great emphasis on the fact that 48 percent of pregnancies in the US are unplanned. Of those unplanned pregnancies, 47 percent end in abortion, 40 percent are carried to full term and 13 percent end in miscarriage. Advocates of abortion often argue that to decrease abortions, unintended pregnancies must be reduced through increased access to contraceptives. But the Guttmacher Institute's research indicates that 53 percent of women who have unintended pregnancies used a contraceptive method during the month they got pregnant. The data also indicates that marriage plays a unique role as a protector of the unborn. According to the report, "Married women account for a lower proportion of abortions (17%), in part because they have low rates of unintended pregnancy," but even in cases of unintended pregnancies, married women "are more likely than unmarried women to continue the pregnancy." And cohabitation is not an adequate substitute for marriage. "About 25% of abortions occur among women living with a male partner to whom they are not married, although such women make up only about 10% of all women aged 15-44." The report also reveals...

Depo Provera Linked to Bone Density Loss (2004)

DEPO-PROVERA LABELED: LINKED TO BONE DENSITY LOSS The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a "black box warning" — the strongest possible FDA warning issued — to the labeling of the Depo-Provera drug, noting that extended use of this injectabel contraceptive can cause "significant bone density loss." [Right to Life, www.cincinnatirighttolife.org. Cincinnati Right to Life, April 2008]   November 17, 2004 Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA Black Box Warning Added Concerning Long-Term Use of Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that a "black box" warning, highlighting prolonged use may result in the loss of bone density, will be added to the labeling of Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection, an established injectable drug approved for use in women to prevent pregnancy. Although Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection has been used for decades for birth control throughout the world and remains a safe and effective contraceptive, FDA and Pfizer, the drug's manufacturer, are taking this action to ensure that physicians and patients have access to this important information. The black box warning for Depo-Provera highlights that prolonged use of the drug may result in significant loss of bone density, and that the loss is greater the longer the drug is administered. This bone density loss may not be completely reversible after discontinuation of the drug.   Thus the warning states that a woman should only use Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection as a long-term birth control method (for example, longer than two years) if other birth control methods are inadequate for her.   Black box warnings are designed to highlight special problems, particularly those that are serious, and to give health care...