Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women – United States & Territories, May 2016

[While still very early in surveillance, it is hoped that actual pregnancy risk may be lower than previously publicized.] As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Among the 157 pregnant women from U.S. states and the District of Columbia monitored through USZPR, 73 (49%) reported clinical symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease. Among these symptomatic pregnant women, 64 (88%) reported rash, 36 (49%) arthralgia, 37 (51%) fever, and 17 (23%) conjunctivitis. Among all (157) pregnancies included from U.S. states, Zika virus nucleic acid detection by rRT-PCR was reported in 39 (25%). Among 122 pregnant residents of the U.S. territories being monitored in USZPR or ZAPSS, 80 (66%) reported clinical symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease. Among these symptomatic women, 60 (75%) reported rash, 29 (36%) arthralgia, 27 (34%) fever, and 15 (19%) conjunctivitis. Among all women included from U.S. territories (122), Zika virus nucleic acid detection by rRT-PCR in serum was identified in 67 (55%). This report launches the weekly reporting of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in U.S. states and territories. Monitoring all pregnant women with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy, whether asymptomatic or symptomatic, will enhance understanding of possible adverse outcomes and allow better estimates of the number of pregnancies at risk for adverse outcomes. Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other brain abnormalities (1) and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. However, the full range...