May 2006: Birth Control

Doctor on FDA Panel Opposes ACOG Morning After Pill Campaign Contrarian Couples Morning After Pill DOCTOR ON FDA PANEL OPPOSES ACOG MORNING AFTER PILL CAMPAIGN. Dr. David Hager  [KY OBGYN] criticized a campaign by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to get doctors to promote MAP/EC, which may sometimes cause an abortion. The campaign features ads for its 49,000 doctors to post in their offices and waiting rooms; the "Ask me" ads include waiting room posters designed to encourage women to ask their doctors about the Plan B drug. "Accidents happen" the posters say. Pro-life doctors who oppose the drug may not be receptive. Because the FDA ultimately rejected the request to sell the morning after pill over the counter and has delayed acting on a second request from the drug's manufacturer, Hager contends the ACOG ad campaign is an effort to promote over the counter sales. However, Dr. Hager told Agape Press that ACOG's contention that the drug will lower pregnancy and abortion rates is contradicted by two leading studies showing the opposite. "A study done out of Scotland, a very well done study, concludes that advance provision of emergency contraception does not reduce abortion rates…They did not find an effect on lowering abortion rates in women who had these prescriptions or had the medication available." Meanwhile, Hager points to another study, done by the University of California at San Francisco and conducted by a Planned Parenthood medical advisor, that showed those rates did not decrease even when women were supplied with the Plan B drugs. UCSF tracked 2,117 local women from age 15 to 24 who...

November/December 2004: Abstinence

New Government Report Offers Even More Evidence that Abstinence Education Works US Birth Rate For Young Teens Lowest Since 1946 California Teen Birth Rate Dropped 40% Between 1991-2002 Congress Agrees on FY-2005 Abstinence Education Funding Levels NEW REPORT OFFERS MORE EVIDENCE THAT ABSTINENCE EDUCATION WORKS – Amidst cries for scientific proof and medical accuracy, the CDC, National Center for Health Statistics released two reports today [10Dec04]  which offer even more evidence that abstinence education works. According to one of the reports, “Teenagers in the United States: Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing, 2002” fewer teens are having sex. Declines were particularly large among males age 15-19. That correlates with the finding that the majority of teens reported receiving formal instruction on how to refuse sexual advances. The report also found that adolescents who chose to engage in sexual activity did so at older ages compared with a similar 1995 review. The findings of this report reveal the total number of teens abstaining from sex before marriage nearly achieves the Healthy People 2010 targets, six years early. Abstinence target rates of 90 percent for teens under age 15 and 75 percent for teens among 15-17 were set as a first wave goal. “It’s hard to argue with numbers. Abstinence education is reaching kids where they’re at and helping them to make healthy choices for their futures,” said Leslee J. Unruh, president of the Abstinence Clearinghouse. “Kids want the truth. Contraception educators have been lying to them for decades, saying that sex outside of marriage can be casual and safe. That’s just not true and kids have learned it the hard...