Germany’s Dilemma- The Other Side of Choice (2010)

Germany’s Dilemma- The Other Side of Choice The distribution of Germany's population is seriously skewed. The population is ageing and there are few births. Lower-Saxony – one of the northern countries of the Republic of Germany – is badly in need of babies. Germany's birth rate is 1.38 per woman, and a rate of 2.1 is required to replace the population. Even with an increased number of immigrants, a replacement rate seems impossible to achieve. Politicians are worried, but not just them alone. The people of Lower Saxony are being wooed by the media to produce more babies. With the slogan 'Baby Boom for Lower Saxony – The most romantic night of the year', Radio Antenne, a popular radio station in the northern part of Germany, spills its ads over the airwaves morning, midday and night. Low birth rates affect all areas of life. In 2009, many companies were looking in vain for candidates for apprenticeships. Approximately 10,000 apprenticeship positions remained unfilled because of lack of candidates. And this year does not look better. This forebodes a future shortage of skilled workers to replace those who die or retire. Encouraging pregnancies   Over the past two years, the German government has put a number of costly measures into effect to encourage couples become parents; increasing the number of kindergartens and after-school-care facilities, incentive pay for staying at home and having babies (up to €1,800 per month), plus an additional child allowance of €184 per child per month … all of this with only slight success. The babies that are born are not enough to replace the population. Is this...

Commentary: World's Elite Make #1 Priority Population Control whileUnderpopulation Looms (09)

Commentary: World's Elite Make Population Control #1 Priority against Backdrop of Underpopulation Threat   Even though recent demographic study has revealed a great looming threat of demographic winter, the richest of the rich seem to believe that overpopulation is the top priority for their philanthropic endeavors.  John Harlow writes today in The Times about a secret meeting of the global financial elite, convened by Microsoft mogul Bill Gates, at which attendees agreed that curbing the world's population should be their top priority.  In "Billionaire club in bid to curb overpopulation," Harlow recounts that a May 5 meeting took place in Manhattan that included "David Rockefeller Jr, the patriarch of America's wealthiest dynasty, Warren Buffett and George Soros, the financiers, Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, and the media moguls Ted Turner and Oprah Winfrey."  Harlow notes that the general agreement that population control was a major priority came at Gates' instigation. Gates' enthusiasm for population control comes as no surprise since he has himself admitted to being strongly influenced by the views of Thomas Malthus, the fear-mongering overpopulation guru of the late 18th century.  He has also admitted that his father headed a local Planned Parenthood while he was growing up.  (http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2003/may/03050902.html) Of note, The Times reports that at the secret meeting, participants "discussed joining forces to overcome political and religious obstacles to change."  "…Since the end of the Second World War, the world's population has grown by four billion, largely because of certain countries that have recently emerged on the international scene as new economic powers, and have experienced rapid development specifically because of the large number...

February 2009: Population / Population Control

Japan Faces Drastic Underpopulation Problems; Workers Leave Early to Make Babies Don Feder gave a jaw-dropping presentation on the coming 'Demographic Winter' Two Children Should Be Limit, Says Green Guru…  Japan faces such strong underpopulation problems that companies are more frequently letting their workers leave work early: to go home and make babies. Leading electronics firm Canon has resorted to the early leave policy because the nation's low birthrate is causing a shortage of workers. "Canon has a very strong birth planning program," company spokesman Hiroshi Yoshinaga. "Sending workers home early to be with their families is a part of it." The Japanese birth rate, currently at 1.34, is well below the 2.0 threshold needed to maintain a nation's population. To help combat the underpopulation problem CNN indicates that Keidanren, Japan's largest business group with 1,300 affiliated companies, has issued a memo urging its members to adopt the same sort of early leave program for workers. Because of the prevalence of abortion and birth control, Japan, like Canada and many European nations, are facing a problem of too few people. The Asian nation is also seeing its population age and having too few workers to support the rash of retirees. The Bank of Japan index underscores the problems by showing that the demand for labor is at its highest level in 16 years. By 2030, the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research estimates the Japanese workforce will shrink 20 percent. With fewer babies born over the years, the agency says 40 percent of Japan's population will be 65 or older by 2050 — more than doubling the...

Population: Documentary Advocates Strong Families to Avert "Demographic Winter" (2008)

 www.demographicwinter.com Filmmakers announced at a National Press Club press conference on 12Feb2008 a "groundbreaking" documentary that addresses the problems of population decline and predicts a coming "demographic winter" that will result from weakened families.    Population decline is projected to seriously affect the sustainability of present societies by reducing the economic and tax bases of nations.  The movie claims that as the number of elderly people swells there will be fewer and fewer young people to help care for them.  The documentary, titled "Demographic Winter: the decline of the human family," was written and directed by Rick Stout to examine developed countries that are below population replacement rates.  The film brings together demographers, economists, sociologists, and civic and religious leaders to explore the problems that present generations will soon face due to shrinking and aging populations.   According to a press release for the film, the global birthrate has declined by 50 percent over the past half-century. Fifty nine nations, containing 44 percent of the world's population, have birthrates below the replacement level of 2.1 children per woman.    The filmmakers report that the European birthrate is 1.3 children per woman.  This dearth of children is expected to cause Europe to have a shortfall of 20 million workers by 2030, while Russia could lose one-third of its population by 2050.  The chilling effect this decline is projected to have on economics and culture has led some to dub the phenomenon a "demographic winter," a phrase from which the documentary takes its title. "In nations with declining populations, who will operate the factories and farms? Who will guard the frontiers?...

The Natural Family and The Rebirth of Society

World Congress on Families Asks Physicians for Help The World Congress on Families, which met last week in Warsaw, Poland, announced in its closing declaration that the various threats to the family in Europe are creating a “demographic winter” that can only be healed by the protection and nurturing of the natural family. Love; faithfulness; gift of self as opposed to hedonism; dedication to divine truth in the face of relativism; love for, instead of fear of children; and reverence for human life in the face of discrimination and “extermination of the weakest” are listed by the Congress as among the gifts of the natural family. Healthy natural families are the “natural essence as a community of love and life,” that will bring about the “rebirth of the society.” With plummeting birth rates and aging populations, the Congress said that Europe is facing a “demographic winter”. The fourth World Congress on Families was organized by the Howard Centre for Family, Religion and Society and is starting to be recognized as the leading international congress opposing the “culture of death”. Attendees heard from Margarita Zavala Gomez Del Campo, First Lady of Mexico, who addressed the Congress by letter, writing, “When you protect the family, you are protecting society and the nation.” The First Lady continued, “The topic of protecting the family transcends all because it is in family where we learn the fundamental moral values needed in today’s world – solidarity, respect, responsibility, love and forgiveness.” The Chairman of the US Christian Film and Television Commission, Dr. Ted Baehr spoke at the Congress warning that the American movie and TV...