CDC Vital Signs: Predicted Heart Age and Racial Disparities in Heart Age Among U.S. Adults at the State Level

Abstract Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Heart age (the predicted age of a person’s vascular system based on their cardiovascular risk factor profile) and its comparison with chronological age represent a new way to express risk for developing cardiovascular disease. This study estimates heart age and differences between heart age and chronological age (excess heart age) and examines racial, socio-demographic, and regional disparities in heart age among U.S. adults aged 30–74 years. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for nearly 800,000 deaths and approximately $320 billion in costs in the United States each year (1). Studies have identified a number of modifiable CVD risk factors, including high blood pressure, smoking, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, and being overweight or obese (1,2). Differences in prevalence of CVD risk factors play important roles in persistent racial, socioeconomic, and regional disparities in CVD morbidity and mortality in the United States (3,4). Results: Overall, average predicted heart age for adult men and women was 7.8 and 5.4 years older than their chronological age, respectively. Statistically significant (p<0.05) racial/ethnic, socio-demographic, and regional differences in heart age were observed: heart age among non-Hispanic black men (58.7 years) and women (58.9 years) was greater than other racial/ethnic groups, including non-Hispanic white men (55.3 years) and women (52.5 years). Excess heart age was lowest for men and women in Utah (5.8 and 2.8 years, respectively) and highest in Mississippi (10.1 and 9.1 years, respectively). Among 236,101 men and 342,424 women, the mean weighted chronological ages were 47.8 and 47.9 years, respectively (Table 1). The corresponding predicted heart ages and excess...

Diabetes Cases May Double, or Triple, by 2050

Perhaps 1 in 3 will have the disease. Obesity plays an increasing role in this situation. According to the report, one in 10 U.S. adults have diabetes now, and the prevalence is expected to rise sharply over the next 40 years, primarily type 2 diabetes, according to a report published in Population Health Metrics. Diabetes is the Number One reason for adult blindness, kidney failure, and limb amputation, and is closely linked to heart attacks and strokes, and to a form of dementia. The CDC estimates the current cost of diabetes at $174 Billion annually — $116 Billion of which is in direct medical costs. [22 Oct 2010, USA TODAY, McLean, VA, Mary Brophy...

Diabetes & Umbilical Cord Stem Cells: 3 Studies (2007)

Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Successful in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes Umbilical Cord Blood Alters Course of Type 1 Diabetes in Newly Diagnosed Mothers Keep On Giving…Stem Cells, That Is…      Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Successful in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes A new US study offers insights into the way stem cells from umbilical cord blood can be used to successfully treat diabetes. Researchers at the University of Florida College of Medicine studied twenty children aged between two and seven with type 1 diabetes, seven of whom were injected with cord blood cells. The researchers concluded that the study suggests that the cells “jump-start” and correct the patient’s own immune system.   "This is the first attempt at using cord blood as a potential therapy for type 1 diabetes. We hope these cells can either lessen the immune system's attack on the pancreas or possibly introduce stem cells that can differentiate into insulin-producing cells," said the lead researcher, Dr. Michael Haller.   Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system starts destroying insulin-producing cells in the pancreas needed to control blood sugar. It can result in heart disease, blindness, kidney disease and death.   The children treated with umbilical cord cells needed an average of 35 per cent less insulin over the following six months, compared with those not given stem cell infusions.   The study was presented yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association in Chicago, where researchers cautioned against an overreaction. They said the treatment was not a cure and that the cause of the immune process in diabetes was still unknown,...

Study Shows Adult Stem Cell Research Helps Type 1 Diabetics (4/07)

Adult stem cells were able to spur prolonged insulin independence in patients. Researchers from Brazil found success with transplanting adult stem cells into patients with newly diagnosed type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes. Dr. Julio C. Voltarelli, from the Regional Blood Center, said the results were "very encouraging"; it was the first time a treatment had been used in human type 1 diabetes [Reuters]. The study involved 15 diabetic patients and who had been diagnosed in the previous six weeks and required insulin. The doctors harvested the patients' own stem cells and injected them intravenously. In the follow-up, 14 of the patients became insulin free — 1 for 35 months, 4 for at least 12 months, and 7 patients for at least 6 months. Two patients responded later to the treatments and were insulin free for one and fifteen months respectively. The authors wrote a report on their study in the Journal of the American Medical Association's April 11 [2007] edition. “Very encouraging results were obtained in a small number of patients with early-onset disease,” the authors wrote. "Ninety-three per cent of patients achieved different periods of insulin independence and treatment-related toxicity was low, with no mortality.” Richard Burt, a co-author of the study from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago: “As a research scientist I am always hesitant to speak of a cure, but the initial results have been good and show the importance of conducting more trials” [London Guardian]. More testing is needed, but he's hopeful the adult stem cell studies will yield more widespread treatments. “It will probably be five to eight years before we...

October 2006: Stem Cell Research

Biotech Firms Want Federal $$ for Dubious Embryonic Stem Cell Research Method Hundreds of MO People Rally in Kansas City Against Human Cloning Adult Stem Cell Research Helps Children With Brain Tumors Adult Stem Cell Research Provides Hope for Kidney & Liver Patients Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Research Produces Insulin for Diabetics Gene Therapy Successfully Treats Cancer TX Umbilical Cord Blood Bank Lacks Donations Stroke Damage Reduced with Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells Thalassemia Cured With Placental Cells Multiple Studies: Adult Stem Cells Can Mimic Embryonic Stem Cells – No need to Kill Human Embryos Adult Stem Cell Industry Growing BIOTECH FIRMS WANT GOVT $ FOR DUBIOUS EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH METHOD. Two leading biotech firms want the federal government to pay to distribute embryonic stem cells obtained through a dubious new method they claim does not destroy human life. However, the method was proven false in previous weeks after a media explosion claimed it solved ethics problems. California-based Advanced Cell Technology (ACT) and WiCell Research Institute [Wisconsin company] plan to distribute new embryonic stem cell lines they say can be obtained without destroying human life. The cell lines would be produced with the Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) technique ACT outlined in a recent paper in the scientific journal Nature. However, Nature was forced to revise press statements about the article that made it appear the technique did not destroy unborn children. Instead, all 16 of the human embryos involved in the research were destroyed and the technique remains hypothetical. None of the 16 embryos involved in the study by medical director Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology (ACT)...