Gates Foundation Suspected of Forcing Controversial Contraceptive on Africans

HIV/AIDS and women’s health advocates are criticizing a recent report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) on the safety of a controversial contraceptive favored by the Gates Foundation. Depo-Provera is a long-acting contraceptive distributed to poor women in the U.S. and through foreign aid programs. “Population control, unfortunately, is back in vogue,” writes Betsy Hartmann, a longtime reproductive rights proponent reacting to the WHO’s policy reversal on Depo-Provera, also known as DMPA. WHO’s revised guidelines released October 21 now mirror those issued by Pfizer Pharmaceutical, Depo-Provera’s manufacturer. It states there is “no evidence of a causal association between DMPA use and an increase in women’s risk of HIV acquisition.” This reversal, says Hartmann, despite 25 years of scientific studies citing an increased risk of HIV transmission among women using it, raises questions about whether WHO abandoned caution due to “outside ‘encouragement’” by special interest groups. Some 40 sexual and reproductive health groups and advocates have asked WHO’s Director General, Dr. Margaret Chan to sideline the new guidelines and remove it from WHO’s website until it can undergo “a rigorous consultative process” at a key meeting scheduled in December. The criticism comes as WHO faces accusations of being unduly influenced by its biggest contributors. Some 70% of donations to WHO are restricted for specific programs. “WHO’s priorities have been “distorted” and “perverted” by these voluntary contributions, said Dr. Linsey McGoey, who studies global philanthropy. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation established a $40 billion endowment for WHO. The $3 billion disbursed annually to WHO makes up 10% of its annual budget. Currently there are no major high-level policy decisions...

March – January 2010: Birth Control

Yet Another Morning After Pill… The Only REAL Effect is Abortifacient… NEW! Synthetic Hormonal Use in Humans and Emerging Risks to the Environment NOTE: Study Finds Half of Women on "Birth Control Shot" Suffer Bone Problems (OG, 1/10)  Protest the Pill Day — June 5 NEW! Women Sue Birth Control Manufacturer over Serious Health Issues 2nd STUDY: Low-Dose Birth Control Pills Decrease Bone Density in Young Women (CJ, 1/10) / Abstract There are long-term adverse physiological and psychological effects for human users of synthetic hormones… and the ecological safety of our environment and drinking water due to the survival of their metabolites through our bodies and through our waste water treatment facilities… Nearly half of women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), commonly known as the birth control shot, will experience high bone mineral density (BMD) loss in the hip or lower spine within two years of beginning the contraceptive [University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston]. More than two million American women use the birth control shot, including approximately 400,000 teens… NOTE: The primary effect of this and any "emergency" contraception is abortifacient. New Morning After Pill 'Can Be Taken up to Five Days After Sex' The first emergency contraceptive pill that can be taken almost a week after sexual intercourse has been developed – but there are fears it could promote promiscuity and lead to a rise in sexually transmitted diseases. The existing "morning-after pill" can be taken up to three days after intercourse, but a new version, called EllaOne, still works five days afterwards. A study shows that it is potentially more effective, reducing the small risk...

Depo Provera Linked to Bone Density Loss (2004)

DEPO-PROVERA LABELED: LINKED TO BONE DENSITY LOSS The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a "black box warning" — the strongest possible FDA warning issued — to the labeling of the Depo-Provera drug, noting that extended use of this injectabel contraceptive can cause "significant bone density loss." [Right to Life, www.cincinnatirighttolife.org. Cincinnati Right to Life, April 2008]   November 17, 2004 Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA Black Box Warning Added Concerning Long-Term Use of Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that a "black box" warning, highlighting prolonged use may result in the loss of bone density, will be added to the labeling of Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection, an established injectable drug approved for use in women to prevent pregnancy. Although Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection has been used for decades for birth control throughout the world and remains a safe and effective contraceptive, FDA and Pfizer, the drug's manufacturer, are taking this action to ensure that physicians and patients have access to this important information. The black box warning for Depo-Provera highlights that prolonged use of the drug may result in significant loss of bone density, and that the loss is greater the longer the drug is administered. This bone density loss may not be completely reversible after discontinuation of the drug.   Thus the warning states that a woman should only use Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection as a long-term birth control method (for example, longer than two years) if other birth control methods are inadequate for her.   Black box warnings are designed to highlight special problems, particularly those that are serious, and to give health care...