Abortion & the Supreme Court: What the Court Actually Said

On January 22, 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court in two separate decisions (Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton) ruled that any state abortion law in the future would have to meet the following guidelines: First Trimester: During the first three months of pregnancy, the state must leave the abortion decision entirely to a woman and her physician. Second Trimester: After the 1st trimester and until viability, the state may only enact laws which regulate abortions in ways “reasonably related to material health.” This simply means that a state may determine who is qualifited to perform the abortion and where it may take place. The state may not, however, enact laws to safeguard the lives of the unborn. After Viability: (Now 20 weeks but then estimated by the Court at sixth or seventh month of pregnancy.) The law may forbid her to have an abortion that is not determined to be necessary to preserve her “life or health”. The Court went on to define the word “health” in such broad terms – i.e. social well-being – as to make it virtually impossible for a state to protect the unborn child at any time during the nine months.  Thus, 7 Justices of the Supreme Court (9 total), disregarding prior legal tradition, overwhelming biological evidence and the ethical traditions of a majority of the American people, struck down the abortion laws of all 50 states (even the most permissive at the time) and made abortion on demand, at virtually every state of pregnancy, the law of the land. On January 22, 1973, the Court gave the United States the dubious distinction of...

A Timeline: Abortion-On-Demand in the USA

KEY ROLE OF LIFE-AFFIRMING STATE LAWS IN THE SUBSTANTIAL DECLINE OF  ABORTION NUMBERS DURING THE 1990s  [research by Harvard-MIT Data Center post-doctoral fellow M. J. New, publ. by the Heritage Foundation (www.heritage.org)] http://www.heritage.org/Research/Family/CDA04-01.cfm 1859. The American Medical Association condemns abortion. 1860s Said to be the beginning of a social and political birth control movement. 1873. Comstock law is passed (a federal law agianst the manufacture, sale, or possession of contraceptives in the District of Columbia and federal territories; also forbade the mailing of contraceptives or advertisements for them). 1875. Every state in the U.S. has adopted laws banning abortion. 1917. Margaret Sanger forms the Birth Control League (now Planned Parenthood) to promote contraception and abortion, and begins a push for the church to accept contraception. 1920. Lambeth Conference at which Anglican Church leaders acknowledged the contraception debate but responded, “We utter an emphatic warning against the use of unnatural means for the avoidance of conception.” 1930. Lambeth Conference at which the acceptance of birth control makes its way into the church. A major victory for Sanger and her cohorts. 1950s Alfred Kinsey’s fraudulent sex reports help define children as sexual from birth. Push to change state laws which would eventually allow and promote sexually explicit sex education programs in public schools. 1961. The National Council of Churches gives its backing to unnatural forms of birth control. 1965. Griswold v. Connecticut sounds the death knell for all anti-contraception legislation in the U.S. The Supreme Court invented a doctrine of privacy to permit the use of birth control. 1967. Colorado becomes the first state to allow abortion for cases of rape,...