Eugenics Silently Returns to Germany (2012)

I read a very disturbing article titled “New prenatal test is bringing eugenics back to Germany,” and I could not help but think of the famous quote from American philosopher George Santayana: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” This month a new prenatal blood test for Down syndrome created by biotech business LifeCodexx was launched in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Lichtenstein, and it very possibly may lead to the repeat of mainstream eugenics in German-speaking Europe. The new Prenatal Test is “targeted exclusively toward women in their 12th week of pregnancy and beyond who are at an increased risk” of having a child born with Down syndrome, and the reality of this test is that it places unborn children with Down syndrome at a higher risk of abortion. “In the near future, the PrenaTest will also be able to identify other chromosomal mutations such as trisomy 13 and 18,” said Dr. Michael Lutz, CEO of LifeCodexx, and the goal seems to be a society free of perceived culturally mandated “imperfections.” Cardinal Christoph Schönborn, Archbishop of Vienna, very strongly criticized the test by stating: “The issue here is artificial selection or eugenics, pure and simple. Is the infernal term ‘life unworthy of life’ going to become reality again?” The German Down Syndrome Information Centre sums up the issue well and put out this statement: “People with trisomy 21 will, in the long run, be the first people with a different genetic makeup to disappear from our society, and with the tacit approval of the majority.” Eugenic history in German-speaking Europe is recent and very well...

Amniocentesis: Some Adverse Effects (2007)

 Dr. Hylton Meire, the retired physician and author of texts on ultrasound, calculates that for every 50 children with Down's syndrome "successfully identified" and killed by abortion, 160 non-affected babies are lost by miscarriage after the test.  In obstetrics, it is now standard practice to offer pregnant women the non-invasive test that measures the fluid at the back of the child's neck. Combined with the age of the mother, the test results is a number taken to indicate the possibility that the child has Down's. If the number is high enough, the mother is offered an amniocentesis, a test in which a needle is inserted into the abdomen and a sample of amniotic fluid is drawn off and analyzed.  With about one in every 1000 children conceived having Down's syndrome, and with amniocentesis carrying a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage, Dr. Meire wrote in the Journal Ultrasound that if all pregnant women took the amniocentesis test as many as 3,200 healthy babies could die by miscarriage every year.  There are about 30,000 amniocentesis tests done every year in the UK. In North America, earlier this year, both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada has recommended that all pregnant women, not just those over 35, should be screened, including with amniocentesis. Parents have the right to be informed of this information prior to such testing.   [LifeSiteNews.com 21Aug07; HLA Action News, Fall...

Canadian Prenatal Screening Called a Reflection of "Nazi Style Eugenics" (3/04)

90% of Downs Syndrome children aborted in Canada /U.S. — Tanis Doe, professor of social work at Victoria University, made the remarks to a group assembled at the University of Alberta. Doe said that pre-screening of pregnant women for genetic defects in their unborn children is a wide-spread practice in western nations. It is a widely-accepted idea that those children with defects should not be allowed to live — a reality borne out by statistics — 89 percent of Downs Syndrome babies in Canada, and 90 percent in the U.S. do not see the light of day. Doe, who is deaf and paraplegic, said that “Women are expected to — pressured to — abort pregnancies when fetal disability is diagnosed.” She stated that, in Canada, there is “minimal support available to raise children with disabilities. Eugenics was practised in the U.K., Canada and the United States before the rise of Hitler,” she asserted. “So what has happened since then is a continuation of the sterilization practices that we have only recently acknowledged.” Dick Sobsey, director of the University of Alberta’s developmental disability centre told the Globe and Mail that her statement, though contentious, is historical. Alberta actively sterilized the mentally handicapped between the years 1928 and 1972, a move that has cost the province $800 million in compensation. Sobsey said that the decision to abort a disabled child is no different from the decision to abort a child with an undesirable gender, although the latter is still considered by most Canadians as barbarous. “Genetic counselling of pregnant women emerged from the eugenics movement,” Sobesy said. “Before the Second World...