Safe Sex (APFLI brochure)

Physicians Series    SAFE SEX   You’ve probably heard a lot of talk about “safe sex” and it may sound great! Here are some medical facts about condoms and “safe sex.” According to a report issued in July 2001 by the National Institutes of Health (NH), there is NO scientific evidence that condoms prevent the transmission of 98% of eight major sexually-transmitted diseases. Condoms were NOT found to provide universal protection against HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, chancroid, trichomoniasis, genital herpes or Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Researchers found only two areas of limited condom effectiveness: heterosexual transmission of HIV (only 0.03% of all annual STD cases) and female-to-male transmission of gonorrhea (2% of all STDs occurring annually in the US). (Gonorrhea is a curable, bacterial disease.) The Executive Panel concluded that condoms “could reduce the risk of gonorrhea,” but only “for men.”  The Panel and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) also recognize that condoms do not stop HPV infection. An estimated 20 million Americans are currently infected with genital HPV (warts). HPV is a major cause of nearly all cervical cancer and has also been linked to penile, prostate, anal and oral cancer. While not everyone infected with HPV will develop cancer, every year 15,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed and 5,000 women die from the disease. Hundreds of thousands of other women will be diagnosed and treated for pre-cancerous conditions. If these “real people” were questioned, it may very well be found that they could provide evidence of the inadequacies of condoms in their “real situations”. . . For the remaining five diseases, the Panel noted that...

Condoms I

Condoms are often portrayed as a means of "safe sex" to provide protection from pregnancy and all STDs. It should be noted that generically (all races, ages, & marital status) condoms fail to prevent pregnancy about 16% of the time, and condoms provide only minimal protection at best against any STD,  including HIV/AIDS.     For a Fact Sheet on Condoms, visit: http://www.hli.org/http://www.hli.org/http://www.hli.org/condom_expose_complete.html or http://www.hli.org/Fact%20Sheet%20on%20Condom%20Failure.html   A draft report for the UN's AIDS agency found that even when people use condoms consistently, the failure rate for protection against HIV is an estimated 10 percent (10%), making them a larger risk than portrayed by many advocate groups. The final study, published by the United Nations AIDS agency (UNAIDS) shows that condoms are ineffective in protecting against HIV an estimated 10% of the time. "The admission from the UN, which is far lower than some studies which have shown larger than 50% failure rates, is a blow to populations control activitst which have aggressively and misleadingly marketed condoms in the third world as 100 percent effective." The report examined two decades of scientific literature on condoms, and UNAIDS says that lead author Norman Hearst "makes a cogent argument that we should be talking about safer sex, not safe sex, with condoms." [emphasis added]  The Boston Globe quotes Edward Green, a senior research scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health, saying the one in 10 failure rate of condoms protection from AIDS is "not good enough for a fatal disease." He said, "The way condoms are marketed in Africa and other develping parts of the world is as if they were 100 percent safe. Condoms have brand...