Condoms – Cumulative Effectiveness (Over Time)

The Impact of Cumulative Effectiveness   Cumulative effectiveness refers to the likelihood of becoming infected with an STD over time. In other words, to what extent does sexual activity with an infected partner over an extended period of time increase the risk – that is, create a cumulative risk? And to what extent are condoms effective at reducing this cumulative risk – that is, provide cumulative effectiveness? Authors Mann, Stine and Vessey published an article in June of 2002 that expanded on this concept of cumulative effectiveness. These researchers used the role of disease-specific infectivity and the number of disease exposures to determine the long-term effectiveness of the latex condom.1 The authors explored the scenario of females having sex with males infected with gonorrhea. The risk of females acquiring gonorrhea from infected males is believed to be 50 percent from one act of sex without using a condom.2   For their calculations the authors used a 3 percent slippage and breakage rate. Assuming the condoms were used correctly and allowing only for a 3 percent chance of slippage and breakage, 1.5 percent of women in this scenario would be expected to acquire gonorrhea after one act of sex with an infected partner. After 10 acts of sex one would expect 14 percent of the women to become infected and after 30 acts of sex with an infected partner, the expected risk would escalate to 37 percent even with perfect condom use. While the authors did not address the scenario of incorrect or inconsistent use, one would expect these additional factors to dramatically increase one’s risk of infection.  1 Mann JR, Stine CC, Vessey J. The role...

CDC: Correct Condom Use

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other organizations emphasize the importance of both consistent and correct condom use for the prevention of STD transmission. While consistent condom use itself is uncommon, even fewer individuals use condoms both consistently and correctly.  Incorrect use includes failure to use a condom during the entire sexual exposure, putting the condom on incorrectly, failure to withdraw the penis while it is still erect, and other such mistakes.    Read More on Correct Condom Use…  www.medinstitute.org    [The Medical Institute...

Birth Control Archive 2003

CONTRACEPTIVE IMPLANON MAY BE WITHDRAWN FROM MARKET –– Hailed as one of the most effective contraceptives ever, Australian doctors say the product could be withdrawn because of rising insurance costs just 2 years after its introduction. Implanon is a hormonal implant inserted into a woman’s arm for up to 3 years. The slow-release contraceptive is already used by more than 160,000 Australian women. But an investigation by Australian United Medical Protection or UMP, has revealed that at least 44 women are in the courts claiming unwanted pregnancies, in a majority of cases, from doctors failing to correctly insert Implanon. UMP and others that handle patient compensation claims may substantially raise indemnity costs for doctors wanting to continue to administer the drug, for fear of litigation. MDA National, another medical insurance company, is charging an extra $5,000/year, the equivalent of insurance costs for an obstetrician. Dr. Heather McNamee says many doctors were inadequately trained in the use of Implanon, 4 cm by 2mm. To insert, if held at a certain angle, it can slip out of the introducer and it’s very difficult to notice unless the doctor double checks just before it’s put in. The problem is that mostly teens and young adults get Implanon from their GP. Most GPs will not pay the extra charge, because because they don’t do enough of these procedures. [http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2003/s956965.htm The World Today – 30 Sept03; Dr Heather McNamee with Toni Hassan] UN REPORT ADDS TO A CONDOM DEBATE – HIV failure rate found to be 10% – A draft report for the UN’s AIDS agency has found that even when people use condoms...