45-Minute Abstinence Lesson

The Medical Institute is offering training in Medical Accuracy in 2008. Contact the Medical Institute at 512.328.6268 for information.   Project Reality Announces Online Training in 2008 Project Reality is now offering online courses for the Navigator teacher training curriculum. This curriculum is used in grades 8 through 12. Contact Project Reality to find out about participating in this World Class Training: Project Reality's Florida office 239.659.1095.     Sometimes, you just don't get much time to talk to teens about abstinence, so even if you only get 20 minutes, you can press the time full and talk fast! Have a short presentation prepared and practiced (you can use this presentation as your base). You never know when you may unexpectedly get an opportunity to speak to teens, and you want to be prepared so that you — and your message — make a good impression! As always, the most important thing you need to get across is to let them know YOU SINCERELY CARE ABOUT THEM as unique individuals — their health, their lives!! Stress this throughout your presentation. Two other quick points: 1) walk among them — let them know you are not afraid of them; 2) pull them into the conversation — ask them questions to keep them involved. [Start your talk by stressing…] I know that all of you are intelligent and can make intelligent decisions, but only if you have all the information! Right? Nobody can make good decisions if they don't have all the facts! So, that's why I'm here: I want to make sure that you have all the up-to-date medical information...

What are 3 "Safe Sex" Myths?

THE MYTHS, &… THE REALITY CHECK   MYTH #1: Teens are using more and better contraceptives. Shouldn’t I get my teen on contraceptives, or give out condoms, to protect him/her? REALITY: Although condom use has increased among teens at first intercourse, the percentage dwindles rapidly after that. Also, in the heat of the moment, do any of us really expect teens to use condoms “correctly” and “consistently” every time? The CDC has already noted several times that if condoms are not used “consistently” and “correctly” every time, it is no more useful than not using them at all! Putting teens on “the pill” or “the shot” provides NO PROTECTION against ANY STD. Actually, these chemical body pollutants change the pH of the vaginal area, making it more susceptible to STD infestation. The long-term effect of chemical “contraceptives” begun when young female bodies are still developing is not fully understood. While condom use has increased at times among teens, sexual activity has greatly increased, because teens have been given a false sense of security. MYTH #2: Pregnancy and birth rates for teens are declining so the “safe sex” message must be working. REALITY: Pregnancy and birth rates are NOT declining among “sexually experienced” (ever had sex) and “sexually active” (sex in past 3 months) teens. They are actually rising sharply. The government calculates the birthrate among adolescents by dividing the total number of births to teen mothers by ALL female teens. This is highly misleading because abstinent females do not become pregnant. Their rates of pregnancy/birth remain steady at zero/1,000. Subtracting abstinent girls from the formula, the non-marital birthrate among...

Why do some teens become sexually active?

Sexual attraction Society & media pressure Peer pressure Use of alcohol and drugs Pressure from boyfriend/girlfriend Desire to be considered “normal” Parents’ example Inappropriate sex education Mistaken beliefs Boredom Low self-esteem Loneliness No good reasons to say “No” The majority of sexually experienced teens wish they had waited… [research from author Dr. Tom Lickona; Abstinence Educators’ Network,...

What does the research show ?

“Schools should be in the business of promoting what is healthy for students. Schools do not advocate: “Don’t smoke. But if you do, only smoke low tar cigarettes with industrial-strength filters.” Nor do we hand out such cigarettes to students who choose to smoke anyway. The same is true of drug use. Schools promote “Don’t smoke.” “Don’t use illegal drugs.” “Don’t use alcohol.” Schools take this stand because of the health risks of these activities. The same should be true of sexual activity outside a mutually faithful, monogamous, life-long relationship. Promoting condom use outside a marriage is inconsistent with this stance. The health risks are just too great…” [Sexual Health Today, The Medical Institute for Sexual Health] “American adolescents stand a better chance of avoiding risky behavior when they experience and express strong connections to their school…students who feel connected to their school report lower levels of emotional distress…A feeling of connectedness to school also protects youth from cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use… Feeling a high level of connectedness to school also is associated with a delay in first sexual intercourse…Other factors associated with a modest delay in sexual debut include attending a…school with high overall average daily attendance…Schools’ attendance records are associated with only one outcome, the onset of sexual intercourse” “Measures of classroom size, teacher training, and parent involvement with school appear unrelated to adolescents’ health behaviors and emotional well-being.” “Teens who have high self-esteem are more likely to be protected from emotional distress. Having a good grade point average is also associated with less emotional distress” in grades 7-12 and is associated with protection from suicidal...

Why should our teens be sexually abstinent ?

There are many physical and emotional reasons. Physically, there is an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases in the U.S., many of which are dangerous and even life-threatening, such as HIV/AIDS and HPV, which is present in almost all cases of abnormal pap smears and cervical cancer. In recent studies, as reported by the CDC, condoms do not prevent the transmission of HPV and only reduce the risk of infection by HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and other major dangerous STDs (see letter by Dr. Perry, above). Also, once a person has one of these STDs, their chances of acquiring HIV are greatly increased. Condoms were invented to stop the passage of sperm, not to stop the passage of extremely small bacteria and viruses. Also, few adults use condoms correctly and consistently, every time; does anyone realistically believe teenagers in the heat of the moment will do better? The CDC has stated that if condoms are NOT used every single time, they are virtually useless in preventing STDs. The “pill” and the “shot” only reduce the risk of conception. The pill must be taken at the same time every day (do our teens remember all their school assignments and appointments? Are they always punctual?). We all dislike pollution in the environment; what dangerous pollution do these chemicals cause in our young daughters’ bodies? When their body metabolism, which is still developing, is unbalanced by these strong hormones, what are the long-term effects? The pill and the shot can actually change the environmental lining of the vagina, apparently making it more susceptible to the transmission of STDs. Teen pregnancy often leads to abortion....