Homosexual Sex Can Kill

“In light of the irrefutable medical facts, it should be considered criminally reckless for educators to teach children that homosexual conduct is a normal, safe and perfectly acceptable alternative form of sexual expression (or ‘sexual orientation’).” Commentary by J. Matt Barber Can you imagine officials at a middle school, junior high or high school setting aside a day to promote “tolerance” for heavy smoking and drinking among children? How about a day where teachers encourage kids to “embrace who they are,” pick up that crack pipe and give it a stiff toke? Neither can I. The public would go ballistic, and for good reason. But that hasn’t stopped officials in thousands of schools across the country from promoting other politically correct and socially “in-vogue” behaviors that – both statistically and manifestly – are every bit as dangerous as the aforementioned frowned-upon behaviors. That’s exactly what the homosexual activist “Day of Silence” is all about – advancing, through clever, feel-good propaganda, full acceptance among children of the homosexual lifestyle. Just the Facts Ma’am By recently admitting that “HIV is a gay disease,” Matt Foreman, outgoing Executive Director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, acknowledged what the medical community has known for decades: the homosexual lifestyle is extremely high-risk and often leads to disease and even death. In fact, multiple studies have established that homosexual conduct, especially among males, is considerably more hazardous to one’s health than a lifetime of chain smoking. To the consternation of “gay” activist flat-earthers and homosexual AIDS holocaust deniers everywhere, one such study – conducted by pro-homosexual researchers in Canada – was published in...

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B (HBV) is caused by a virus and results in chronic liver disease. There is no cure. Over 100,000 to 200,000 cases are reported annually. About 5000-6000 U.S. deaths occur each year from HBV infection that leads to liver disease. If a person has contracted Hepatitis A or Hepatitis C, he/she can still get Hepatitis B. HBV is spread by: having sex with an infected person direct contact with blood of an infected person How to Protect Against HBV Infection Avoid Sexual Contact with HBV-infected persons. Remember, you cannot tell by looking at people if they have STDs! In the case of Hepatitis, some people might exhibit yellow eyes/skin; but many people have no such symptoms. According to the CDC: "The efficacy of latex condoms in preventing infection with HBV is unknown, but their proper use may reduce transmission." Therefore, because you cannot usually see HBV symptoms, and because condoms still involve obvious risk, sexual abstinence is your only 100% certain way to eliminate the risk of Hepatitis. Avoid any contact with drugs, needles, syringes, or other materials that may contain blood (could be contaminated with HBV) Avoid sharing personal care items, such as razors or toothbrushes Think very seriously about the health risks of tattoos or body piercing (it is crucial that needles/equipment be sterilized, that disposable gloves are used, and that the piercer/artist washes his/her hands properly) Always handle needles and sharp instruments carefully in your workplace. [excerpts from "Prevent Hepatitis B", HHS, CDC, 8/03]  Hepatitis B During 1990–2004, the number of acute hepatitis B cases reported annually declined 68% (1). This steady decline has coincided...

Physicians Series Brochure: STDs

YES, WHEN TWO PEOPLE HAVE SEXUAL INTERCOURSE, they are having intercourse with everyone with whom they both have ever had intercourse, because many sexually transmitted diseases have no symptoms and are very difficult – if not impossible – to cure. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES (STDs) are increasing in the U.S. and many are at epidemic proportions. Most are spread by sexual intercourse, oral sex and anal sex. Many STDs can seriously damage you forever. People who have one STD generally have acquired more than one and have dramatically increased their chances of acquiring HIV. The best way to avoid contracting STDs is to avoid sexual activity outside a faithful monogamous marriage.   The STD rate among teenagers and young adults is high. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report that two-thirds of all STD cases occur among persons under 25 years of age (Hidden Epidemic, 1996). Many of these diseases cause long-term, adverse effects. Women’s health and future ability to bear children can be jeopardized. More babies are born with birth defects from STDs than all the children stricken with polio in the 1950s (Hager H. Gayle, MD, MPH, Dir. CDC Center for HIV/STD, 1/98).   The CDC report that STDs infect 3 million teens or more each year because many cases of STDs among teens go unreported. 80 percent of those STD-infected have no symptoms and may not realize they are infected (Safe Sex, J. McIlhaney, MD). Teens compose 10% of the population but contract 25% of the STDs each year (MISH, 7/97). Between 100,000 and 150,000 American women become sterile each year because of STD-related infections (American Social Health Association, 1994; CDC, 1994 Annual Report). There...