Obama Admin Finally Admits Abstinence is the Best Way to Avoid Sexually Transmitted Diseases (2015)

When it comes to self-control, the government has a hard enough time practicing it — let alone promoting it! That’s why last week’s announcement from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) was so important. After years of burying its head in the sand and throwing billions of dollars at an STD problem it helped create, the government finally admitted what … common sense made abundantly clear: abstinence and monogamy are the only ways to avoid disease. In its 2015 “Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines,” a two-word change made all the difference. Five years ago, the CDC used to say abstinence and monogamy were “a reliable way to avoid disease.” As of last Friday, the agency agrees it’s “the most reliable way”. [ http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/06/05/federal-government-shifts-now-says-monogamy-abstinence-most-reliable-protections-against-stds/ ] That may not seem like a radical edit to most people, but in this administration, moral purity is as foreign a concept as political transparency. For years, FRC and other groups have fought the spread — not just of infection and disease — but of the mentality that sexual liberalism should be promoted in schools, prioritized in health care, and paid for by taxpayers. As a result, the government is spending $16 billion a year cleaning up the mess it helped make with the “if-it-feels-good-do-it” approach. With more than 20 million new cases of STDs cropping up every year, America’s biggest health crisis may be the one nobody’s talking about. A monster strain of gonorrhea is spreading, and experts say it might be worse than AIDS. That explosion, along with the spike in chlamydia infections, syphilis, HIV, Hepatitis, and herpes is panicking the medical community,...

Physicians Series Brochure: STDs

YES, WHEN TWO PEOPLE HAVE SEXUAL INTERCOURSE, they are having intercourse with everyone with whom they both have ever had intercourse, because many sexually transmitted diseases have no symptoms and are very difficult – if not impossible – to cure. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES (STDs) are increasing in the U.S. and many are at epidemic proportions. Most are spread by sexual intercourse, oral sex and anal sex. Many STDs can seriously damage you forever. People who have one STD generally have acquired more than one and have dramatically increased their chances of acquiring HIV. The best way to avoid contracting STDs is to avoid sexual activity outside a faithful monogamous marriage.   The STD rate among teenagers and young adults is high. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report that two-thirds of all STD cases occur among persons under 25 years of age (Hidden Epidemic, 1996). Many of these diseases cause long-term, adverse effects. Women’s health and future ability to bear children can be jeopardized. More babies are born with birth defects from STDs than all the children stricken with polio in the 1950s (Hager H. Gayle, MD, MPH, Dir. CDC Center for HIV/STD, 1/98).   The CDC report that STDs infect 3 million teens or more each year because many cases of STDs among teens go unreported. 80 percent of those STD-infected have no symptoms and may not realize they are infected (Safe Sex, J. McIlhaney, MD). Teens compose 10% of the population but contract 25% of the STDs each year (MISH, 7/97). Between 100,000 and 150,000 American women become sterile each year because of STD-related infections (American Social Health Association, 1994; CDC, 1994 Annual Report). There...