Schools Put Girls as Young as 12 on the Pill Without Their Parents Knowing

In Britain, one in 20 minors are being prescribed birth control pills without their parents’ knowledge. The Daily Mail reports that some of these girls are as young as 12-years-old, and approximately 75,000 girls under the age of 16 receive the pill every year. This is a 50% increase in a decade. Unfortunately, parents are not aware that their daughters are on the pill because doctors aren’t required to inform them. The British pro-life group, Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (SPUC), said the following about the statistics: “Giving birth-control pills to under-age girls is uncaring towards children, undermines parents and exploits an uninformed public. It is uncaring towards children, because it ignores the fact that sexually-transmitted infections among teenagers have risen at the same time as increased provision of contraceptives. They continued, “It undermines parents by denying them their right and responsibility to govern their children’s behavior. It exploits an uninformed public, because no-one is told that, according to the manufacturers, the ordinary birth-control pill can kill newly-conceived embryos. In short, schoolchildren and parents are being betrayed by the birth control policies at work in Britain.” In the past, doctors have warned that the effect of oral contraceptives on minor girls is unknown and there could be long-term health risks for teenagers. They also said the pill encourages girls to engage in risky sexual behavior and normalizes underage sex, which results in more sexually transmitted diseases among teenagers. In fact, the statistics show that chlamydia cases have doubled to 206,774 in Britain; gonorrhea cases to 34,958; and herpes cases have increased by 79%. These diseases can be...

July – January 2009: STDs

Clinic-Based Testing for Rectal and Pharyngeal Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis Infections by Community-Based Organizations — Five Cities, United States, 2007 Herpes Rates Among Young Adults Aged 20-29 Years Researchers Suspect Oral Sex to Blame for Rise in Tonsil Cancer Primary & Secondary Syphilis in AL in Heterosexuals / CDC Report Warns Syphilis is Still Ravaging the Homosexual Community… Clinic-Based Testing for Rectal and Pharyngeal Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis Infections by Community-Based Organizations — Five Cities, United States, 2007 CDC recommends screening of at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) at least annually for urethral and rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia, and for pharyngeal gonorrhea (1)…To determine sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing practices among community-based organizations serving MSM, CDC and the San Francisco Department of Public Health gathered data on rectal and pharyngeal gonorrhea and chlamydia testing at screening sites managed by six gay-focused community-based organizations in five U.S. cities during 2007…In total, approximately 30,000 tests were performed; 5.4% of rectal gonorrhea, 8.9% of rectal chlamydia, 5.3% of pharyngeal gonorrhea, and 1.6% of pharyngeal chlamydia tests were positive. These results demonstrate that gay-focused community-based organizations can detect large numbers of gonorrhea and chlamydia cases and might reach MSM not being tested elsewhere… During April 2008, the 10 U.S. cities with the highest estimated number of gay, lesbian, or bisexual residents were identified (5). Gay-focused community-based organizations in each city that provide rectal and pharyngeal gonorrhea and chlamydia testing to MSM were identified through community leaders and Internet searches… Data for 2007 were collected during April–July 2008… Organizations that used NAA testing generally had higher rates of positivity than...

STD/STI Statistics > Fast Facts (ASHA)

Estimating how many STD cases occur is not a simple or straightforward task. First, most STDs can be "silent," causing no noticeable symptoms. These asymptomatic infections can be diagnosed only through testing. Unfortunately, routine screening programs are not widespread, and social stigma and lack of public awareness concerning STDs often inhibits frank discussion between health care providers and patients about STD risk and the need for testing. [ASHA. Sexually Transmitted Diseases in America: How Many Cases and at What Cost? December 1998]   More than half of all people will have an STD at some point in their lifetime. [1] The estimated total number of people living in the US with a viral STD is over 65 million. [2] Every year, there are at least 15 million new cases of STDs, some of which are curable. [2,3] More than $8 billion is spent each year to diagnose and treat STDs and their complications. This figure does not include HIV. [4] In a national survey of US physicians, fewer than one-third routinely screened patients for STDs. [5] Less than half of adults ages 18 to 44 have ever been tested for an STD other than HIV/AIDS. Each year, one in four teens contracts an STD. [6] One in two sexually active persons will contact an STD by age 25. [7] About half of all new STDs in 2000 occurred among youth ages 15 to 24. [8] The total estimated costs of these nine million new cases of these STDs was $6.5 billion, with HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) accounting for 90% of the total burden. [9] Of the STDs that...

Sexual Activity, Condoms, Contraceptive Use, STDs: What We Know Now (update 08.09)

CONTRACEPTIVE USE   • Fifty-four percent of women who have abortions had used a contraceptive method (usually the condom or the pill) during the month they became pregnant. Among those women, 76% of pill users and 49% of condom users report having used their method inconsistently, while 13% of pill users and 14% of condom users report correct use.[Jones RK, Darroch JE and Henshaw SK, Contraceptive use among U.S. women having abortions in 2000–2001, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2002, 34(6):294–303; Alan Guttmacher Institute, July 2008, http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/fb_induced_abortion.html]     Can STDs/STIs be prevented? Yes, STIs can be prevented. Avoid all sexual activity if you are single or be faithful to one uninfected partner for life. This is the only way to avoid the risk of an infection.   Condoms There are also a number of ways to reduce the risk — but NOT eliminate the risk —  of infection. The fewer people you have sex with, the lower your risk of getting STIs. Correct and consistent condom use can also reduce (but not eliminate) your risk of getting most STIs. Consistent and Correct condom use (100%) during vaginal sex reduces your risk for: HIV by 85% [18-22]  Gonorrhea by about 50% [18,25-28] Chlamydia by about 50% [18,25-28] Herpes by about 50% [18,27-28] Syphilis by about 50% [16,18,25-27] HPV by 50% or less [18,22-24] Few studies have been done to see whether condoms reduce the risk of STIs, including HIV, during oral sex or anal sex.  Waiting to have sex until you are in a faithful, lifelong relationship (such as marriage) is the only certain way to avoid being...

AAP Releases Teen Pregnancy Policy (7/05)

The American Academy of Pediatrics, through its Committee on Adolescence led by Dr. Jonathan D. Klein, published a report, “Adolescent Pregnancy: Current Trends and Issues,” in the July 2005 issue of the organization’s journal, Pediatrics.  The report is a great disappointment.  It is primarily an ideological treatise which rehashes old, failed arguments which suggest that condoms and contraceptives are the primary solution for the teen pregnancy problem.  (Fifty-seven of the 74 references are more than five years old and most new credible references on important issues have been ignored.) [Medical Institute Advisory]…  Almost as egregious as this poor scientific scholarship, however, is what was omitted.  Dr. Klein and his committee, who one would suppose care about the “whole child,” never discuss the following issues:The psychosocial impact of adolescent sexual activity.For example, sexually active adolescents, both boys and girls, are far more likely to be depressed and to attempt suicide than youth who are still virgins. Condoms and contraceptives do not solve this problem. The problem of an increasing number of lifetime sexual partners.The majority of adolescents who become sexually active frequently change sexual partners and will have an increased number of lifetime sexual partners.  An increased number of lifetime sexual partners is one of the greatest risks for acquiring a sexually transmitted infection (STI/STD). The problem of STIs among adolescents is an epidemic.1. Approximately 50 percent of adolescents who are sexually active are infected with Human Papilloma Virus.  HPV is the cause of 99 percent of cervical cancer and 99 percent of truly abnormal pap smears.  This cancer is causing about as many deaths among women as AIDS.  2....