July 2005: STDs/STIs

Chlamydia Common in USA New HPV Vaccines Study: Oral Contraceptives Almost Double the Shedding of Herpes II US Backs Off Stipulation on AIDS Funds How to Tackle the AIDS/HIV Scourge HIV Infections Have Increased in the Philippines; Coincides with Increased “Safe Sex” Promotion CHLAMYDIA COMMON IN THE USA As many as 1 in 20 teenage girls and women and more than 2 percent of the general population in America are infected with chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease, US researchers reported on 12 July. Pregnant women attending publicly funded clinics and economically disadvantaged youth are especially at risk of the bacterial infection, which can cause serious problems including infertility if untreated, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] survey found. “STDs often have no symptoms and therefore frequently go unrecognized and undiagnosed,” said Dr. John Douglas, director of the CDC’s STD prevention programs. “Stepping up screening and prevention efforts is critical to ensuring that young people do not suffer the long-term effects of untreated chlamydia, including infertility,” Douglas said in a statement. [Well informed sexual decision-making would help most young people to eliminate the risk by avoiding sexual activity outside marriage.] CDC researchers found 2.2 percent of U.S. adults aged 14 to 39 had chlamydia. Nearly 1 in 20 women between the ages of 14 and 19 — 4.6 percent — were infected. Chlamydia is easily cured with antibiotics, but is often undiagnosed because of its causes few symptoms. Besides infertility, the infection can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. [Reuters Health, 07/13/05; Abstinence Clearinghouse E-Mail Update, 06/20/05]   NEW HPV VACCINES must be administered to preteens who...