State of Texas: Proposed Fetus Disposal Rule Will Not Burden Medical Facilities

The rule is meant to protect the public from communicable diseases, according to a state analysis. An abortion rights activist said state officials have ignored concerns aired this summer. The state said that small facilities can turn to unspecified private businesses to help with extra costs. A proposed state rule requiring the cremation or burial of miscarried and aborted fetuses will not cost medical facilities more money despite concerns from abortion rights advocates, according to an analysis by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission. “What we found through our research is that the proposed rules won’t increase total costs for health care facilities,” agency spokeswoman Carrie Williams said. Current rules allow fetal remains, as with other medical tissue, to be ground up and discharged into a sewer system, incinerated, disinfected or handled by some other approved process, followed by disposal in a landfill. The state agency said in its analysis, published Thursday, that the purpose of the rule is the “protection of the health and safety of the public” from communicable diseases. The rule, unchanged from when it was first proposed in July, is now subject to a 30-day public comment period before it goes into effect at a later unspecified date. Abortion advocates have said the proposal, which would change how health care providers dispose of fetal remains that aren’t donated for research, would drive up the cost of an abortion and discourage women from seeking a safe procedure. “The Department of State Health Services did not take seriously, and refuses to respond to, the thousands of public comments, and hours of testimony opposing these rules, that...

Ohio Senate Passes Bill to Stop Planned Parenthood From Dumping Aborted Babies in Landfills

Yesterday [25 May 2016], the Ohio Senate approved legislation that would require abortion businesses to treat the bodies of aborted babies humanely after the abortion. The bill came about after Planned Parenthood abortion sites were caught dumping aborted babies in landfills. The abortion business pays to have aborted babies “steam cooked” before dumping them in landfills. The bill requires that the remains of aborted children are given humane burial or cremation and increases informed consent by requiring full disclosure to women pursuing abortions of their options for the aborted baby’s treatment. The legislation was introduced in December when Attorney General Mike DeWine revealed Planned Parenthood to be sending aborted children’s remains to landfills. “The more our society learns about the horrors of abortion, the more we are obligated to respond with courage and compassion,” said Kayla Atchison, director of external affairs for Ohio Right to Life. “The Ohio Senate is fulfilling that obligation with their efforts to shine a light on the abortion industry’s inhumane practices, and their work to preserve the dignity of the unborn child. We thank Chairman Coley and the Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee for their leadership and work to preserve the dignity of the unborn child.” “With careful attention to detail and sincere compassion for all victims of abortion, the Ohio Senate is leading the state’s efforts to recognize and respect the dignity of every human person,” said Kayla Atchison, director of external affairs for Ohio Right to Life. “While we know there is nothing dignified in the act of abortion itself, we believe that this legislation is necessary for ensuring respect for...