Abortion Moratorium: Using the United Nations Against Itself

Call for abortion moratorium has met astounding and favorable public response from nations as diverse as Spain and India Hot-button pro-life and pro-family issues have the power to define politicians and their campaigns. Yet the campaign debates on pro-life matters have centered largely on domestic policy. Now, in a strange twist of events at the global level, politicians may find themselves pressured to answer an international demand for a worldwide moratorium on abortion. Just a month old, the call for an abortion moratorium has already met an astounding and favorable public response from nations as diverse as Spain and India. Advocates report that the moratorium has persuasive force with people of all backgrounds. “It is a human matter, yes? Not only for people of religious faith,” said Lola Velarde, president of the European Network Institute for Family Policies in Spain. The moratorium arose as an unexpected response to a United Nations’ resolution calling on its member states to submit to a voluntary moratorium on the death penalty. The resolution, a “landmark step” passed in December, justified its call for the moratorium because the death penalty “undermines human dignity.” Furthermore, the resolution states, the moratorium contributes to a “progressive development of human rights.” Support for the UN’s death penalty moratorium included the Holy See Mission to the UN. The delegation’s statement read, in part, “In welcoming the adoption of this draft resolution, the Holy See once again calls on all States to take a consistent view on the right to life, in a way that their support for this important draft resolution would equally mean their support for the protection...