Feminists Clash with African Women

Anti-family feminists with theories and prominent positions flat-out oppose the real-world experience of mothers who are hands-on dealing with terrorism – because their solution relies on the family and not handing power and money to feminist groups. African Women’s Solutions to War Clash with Feminists’ Agenda When the UN Security Council adopted its latest resolution on the role of women in international peacebuilding and security last month, a familiar clash of opinions surfaced—among women. In particular, feminists driving the international policies are on opposite sides of women living in the realities of war-challenged areas. At a panel hosted by Liechtenstein, a well-connected feminist worried the emerging pro-family movement at the UN may conflict with her expectations for the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda. Meanwhile, another panelist from Nigeria strongly urged the audience to be mindful of the cultural contexts within countries, calling attempts to impose cultural change as part of peace-building “not sustainable.” “Right now, feminists stride the halls of power,” said professor Anne Marie Goetz, formerly of UN Women. However, she said, a changing geopolitical landscape and the rise in violent extremism has resulted in the “reconsolidation of rather extremely conservative values.” She cited the recently-formed “Group of Friends of the Family” at the UN, describing it as being “about reasserting a romantic traditional, rather rigid view, a heteronormative view, of the family.” Goetz had expressed similar concerns—that WPS activism was focusing too much on security and not enough on “attacking patriarchy”— at at a conference last year, where she also admitted that the WPS documents do not mention abortion, though she insisted it was “meant” and...