Serious Medical Concerns & Questions About Women/Teen Health and EC/MAP (Plan B) (2004)

For more articles concerning EC/MAP, click here. Emergency Contraception [EC] is a very potent medication. EC is also called the Morning After Pill [MAP]. (A specific brand of EC sold in the USA is Plan B.) EC is being provided in local health department clinics in most states. It is billed as a way to avoid pregnancy. State Health Departments are NOT required to dispense this medication. Based on HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson’s clarification that states are not required to dispense EC at county health clinics, we urge states to stop the distribution of EC, and we urge the FDA to NOT approve the sale of EC over-the-counter [OTC] for the reasons that follow: The Alabama Department of Public Health calls EC distribution “Good Public Health Policy” to prevent unplanned pregnancy and decrease abortion rates. Even if this were proven, the use of EC without medical oversight is very contrary to sound medical principles. 1.  The ACOG recommends regular STD testing for sexually active women, and especially for those outside a monogamous relationship.  That there would be an increase in sexual activity and exposure to STDs with the use of EC is a given, with no physician oversight.      The Swedish Institute for Disease Control1 and the Washington State Health Department2 have noted a significant increase in Chlamydia infection in women, especially teens, in the 5 years following OTC availability of EC. (Free distribution of EC at all county health departments may not be equivalent to OTC purchase; but the ease of availability is certainly similar.) Untreated Chlamydia is a major cause for infertility.  Who can imagine how...