Cancer as a Case Against Abortion

The risk of breast cancer among the general population is now close to 12%. Lost in the politics of women’s health and kept away from public debate, there has been medical evidence that abortion is a contributory factor in the increased incidences of breast cancer. The first evidence was published in the April 1957 English edition of the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research. The study, led by Patrick Carroll, looked at breast cancer rates in Britain, Finland, Sweden and the Czech Republic. He found that “Breast cancer incidence has risen in parallel with rising abortion rates. There is no doubt there is a causal relationship” (BBC, p.2). Many studies have failed to ascertain the relationship between abortion and cancer and have failed to distinguish between miscarriages and induced abortions, notes Professor Brind. Since mammalians share similar reproductive systems, the study used rats and examined the terminal end buds (TEB) within the mammary glands where cancer usually occurs. These cells develop for lactation and remain undifferentiated until the end of the pregnancy. Full-term pregnancy resulted in the maturity of TEBs. Prevention of the maturity of these cells led to cancerous cells later. Researchers theorize that this is because during puberty and pregnancy there is excess estrogen available, causing the mammary glands increase in size. The surge of estrogen then leads to the growth of undifferentiated cells in the mammary glands as the body prepares to produce milk. The mechanisms that support estrogen levels are the hormones progesterone, which helps balance estrogen – especially after pregnancy; and melatonin which reduces excess estrogen. All normal mammary glands have estrogen receptors and in...