To Divorce-Proof Yourself, Don’t Have Premarital Sex: Report

Some say it’s good to have a lot of sex partners before marriage so you get used to trying people out and can find what you like. Others, like me, have said that’s crazy talk. If you get used to shopping around before marriage, you’re developing a bad habit of loving and leaving that will make you more likely to divorce once married. A new study provides more ammunition for the latter idea. The study, of women who married in the 2000s, purports to find a “counterintuitive” result: That both women with zero to one and with three to nine sex partners are less likely to divorce than ladies with two or more than ten partners. Therefore, it says, “the relationship between divorce and the number of sexual partners women have prior to marriage is not linear.” But take a look at the graph. If you learned elementary-school-level graph-reading skills, you will see that only one sex partner frequency — the spouse only – no sex partners before marriage — is associated with extremely low divorce rates five years into marriage: graph — http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/06/report-to-divorce-proof-yourself-dont-have-premarital-sex/ So what do we see here? That women who married in the 2000s were least likely to divorce if they had no sex partners before marriage, at a rate of approximately 6 percent. That’s almost divorce-proof. Even just one sex partner before marriage moved up a woman’s chances of divorce within five years of marriage to one in five chances, at a 20 percent rate. Even though there’s a small dip between two and ten sex partners before marriage, the divorce rate for every other...

CDC: Data on American Men & Fatherhood

Nearly half of U.S. men without a high school education have fathered a child outside of marriage, compared to about 6 percent of college graduates, according to a survey released on Wednesday. The survey, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics includes detailed information on sex, marriage and parenthood from young men for the first time. It finds that 47 percent of men and 58 percent of women aged 15 to 44 have ever had a child, inside or outside marriage. Premarital sex is OK, according to the 60 percent of men in this age group who agreed or strongly agreed that it was “all right for unmarried 18-year-olds to have sexual relations if they have strong affection for each other.” Fifty-one percent of women and girls aged 15 to 44 approved of premarital sex at the age of 18. The study is based on a analysis of the National Survey of Family Growth conducted in 2002 among 7,643 females and 4,928 males. It found that 77 percent of men had sexual intercourse before the age of 20, and close to 30 percent by age 16. The in-person survey found one-third of men marry by the age of 25 and almost two-thirds marry by 30. Half of women are married by the time they are 25 and three-quarters by age 30 and they tend to marry men who are, on average, two years older. The report found that 50 percent of young men who married before the age of 20 ended up divorced within 10 years compared with 17 percent of men who...

Early Sexual Activity & Multiple Sex Partners (updated)

The Harmful Effects of Early Sexual Activity and Multiple Sexual Partners Among Women: A Book of Charts Early initiation of sexual activity and higher numbers of non-marital sex partners are linked in turn to a wide variety of negative life outcomes, including increased rates of infection with sexually transmitted diseases, increased rates of out-of-wedlock pregnancy and birth, increased single parenthood, decreased marital stability, increased maternal and child poverty, increased abortion, increased depression, and decreased happiness. This report examines the linkages between early initiation of sexual activity, number of nonmarital sex partners, and human well-being. In general, the earlier a woman begins sexual activity, the greater the number of non-marital sex partners she is likely to have over the course of her life. Open the Book of Charts (pdf) www.heritage.org/Research/Family/loader.cfm?url=/commonspot/security/getfile.cfm&PageID=44695 [www.heritage.org/Research/Family/abstinence_charts.cfm] The study is based on the National Survey of Family Growth, a survey fielded in 1995 to a nationally representative sample of roughly 10,000 women between the ages of 15 and 44, sponsored and funded by the Centers for Disease Control of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Because men are not included in the NSFG, they are not included anywhere in this report. [Robert E. Rector, Kirk A. Johnson, Ph.D., Lauren R. Noyes, Shannan Martin, Executive Summary, June 26, 2003, Heritage Foundation...