U.S. Population Falls to Dangerous Levels Below Replacement Rate

The fertility rate in the United States fell again to another record low in 2012, in part due to the recession that is making couples more reticent to consider having more children in their family. While abortion contributes to destroy more than one million unborn children on an annual basis in the USA, new figures from the CDC show the American population is at dangerously low levels — so low that the U.S. birth rate is below the replacement rate needed to sustain the population [replacement level is 2.1 children per couple per reproductive lifetime in developed nations].  ...

Population Control Evolved (2010)

For the past forty years, the United Nations has been beating the drums about “overpopulation.” One of their most successful propaganda and fundraising gambits of late has been “World Population Day.” Steven W. Mosher It started as "Five Billion Day." This was the day—July 11, 1989, to be exact—when the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) estimated that the world's population would reach five billion. With one voice, the U.N. Population Fund, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, and related anti-people groups decried the growing threat of “overpopulation,” and asked the governments of the world for billions of dollars to deal with this supposed crisis. But a billion human beings are not added to the planet's population very often. Annual funding requests needed an annual justification. Thus the following July 11th was billed as “World Population Day (WPD)”, as has every subsequent July 11th up to the present day. In its initial iteration, World Population Day consisted of dismal pronouncements from the United Nations Population Fund—the lead spear carrier for this unholy day—bringing us the bad tidings that we are breeding ourselves off the face of the planet. This early “apocalypse now” style proved effective at generating massive press coverage, which in turn prompted parliaments around the world to open up their purses. The rhetoric of World Population Day has softened considerably in the years since. First of all, the numbers simply didn't support the old population bomb thesis. Birth rates were falling farther and faster than anyone thought imaginable. Second, forced-pace population control programs in China and elsewhere had produced a backlash in the West. The 1994 Cairo conference marks...

Germany’s Dilemma- The Other Side of Choice (2010)

Germany’s Dilemma- The Other Side of Choice The distribution of Germany's population is seriously skewed. The population is ageing and there are few births. Lower-Saxony – one of the northern countries of the Republic of Germany – is badly in need of babies. Germany's birth rate is 1.38 per woman, and a rate of 2.1 is required to replace the population. Even with an increased number of immigrants, a replacement rate seems impossible to achieve. Politicians are worried, but not just them alone. The people of Lower Saxony are being wooed by the media to produce more babies. With the slogan 'Baby Boom for Lower Saxony – The most romantic night of the year', Radio Antenne, a popular radio station in the northern part of Germany, spills its ads over the airwaves morning, midday and night. Low birth rates affect all areas of life. In 2009, many companies were looking in vain for candidates for apprenticeships. Approximately 10,000 apprenticeship positions remained unfilled because of lack of candidates. And this year does not look better. This forebodes a future shortage of skilled workers to replace those who die or retire. Encouraging pregnancies   Over the past two years, the German government has put a number of costly measures into effect to encourage couples become parents; increasing the number of kindergartens and after-school-care facilities, incentive pay for staying at home and having babies (up to €1,800 per month), plus an additional child allowance of €184 per child per month … all of this with only slight success. The babies that are born are not enough to replace the population. Is this...

February 2009: Population / Population Control

Japan Faces Drastic Underpopulation Problems; Workers Leave Early to Make Babies Don Feder gave a jaw-dropping presentation on the coming 'Demographic Winter' Two Children Should Be Limit, Says Green Guru…  Japan faces such strong underpopulation problems that companies are more frequently letting their workers leave work early: to go home and make babies. Leading electronics firm Canon has resorted to the early leave policy because the nation's low birthrate is causing a shortage of workers. "Canon has a very strong birth planning program," company spokesman Hiroshi Yoshinaga. "Sending workers home early to be with their families is a part of it." The Japanese birth rate, currently at 1.34, is well below the 2.0 threshold needed to maintain a nation's population. To help combat the underpopulation problem CNN indicates that Keidanren, Japan's largest business group with 1,300 affiliated companies, has issued a memo urging its members to adopt the same sort of early leave program for workers. Because of the prevalence of abortion and birth control, Japan, like Canada and many European nations, are facing a problem of too few people. The Asian nation is also seeing its population age and having too few workers to support the rash of retirees. The Bank of Japan index underscores the problems by showing that the demand for labor is at its highest level in 16 years. By 2030, the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research estimates the Japanese workforce will shrink 20 percent. With fewer babies born over the years, the agency says 40 percent of Japan's population will be 65 or older by 2050 — more than doubling the...

Fall 2006: Population

German Population Plunge "Irreversible" USA May Have 300 Million People, But No Overpopulation Worries European Nations Have UNDERPopulation Problems US Commission Reports China Still "Strictly Controls Reproductive Lives" of Women GERMAN POPULATION PLUNGE “IRREVERSIBLE” Federal Stats Office Admits. One third of all European children will be born to Muslim families by 2025; the birthrate has dropped so low that immigration numbers cannot compensate. Germany has the lowest birthrate in Europe, with an average of 1.36 children per woman. Despite government incentives to encourage larger families, the population is dropping rapidly and that trend will continue, with an expected loss of up to 12 million by 2050. That would mean about a 15 percent drop from the  country’s current population of 82.4 million [German news Deutsche Welle, 9Nov]. The low birthrate will cause the German population to age dramatically over the next 40 years–last year there were 144,000 more deaths than births, and that number could increase to 600,000 by 2050, the FSO forecast stated. With a 22 percent reduction in the workforce and increasing costs for senior assistance and medical care, the drop in population is expected to have a radical impact on the nation’s economy, along with the welfare budget. “I wouldn’t like to use the word ‘bankrupt’ because it’s a major challenge for the social insurance systems, that’s for certain…In every case, you need someone who has to work and give you some earnings” Radermacher said in an interview with DW-Radio. “The projections tell us the development of demographic trends will be even more dramatic in the eastern part of Germany,” Radermacher said . “This is because...