The Pill

According to FDA information, the typical pregnancy rate for women using the pill is 5 percent. This means that of every 100 women using the pill, 5 will be pregnant within 12 months. About 10.4 million American women use the pill; thus there are more than 500,000 pregnancies per year among these pill users. Two surveys by AGI (Planned Parenthood research arm) have shown that 56%- 58% of women procuring abortions were using some method of birth control the month they became pregnant.   Pharmacist Patrick McCrystal said 20-30 mcg estrogen Pills, designed to minimize side effects, have a "breakthrough" ovulation rate between 2-10%, and progestogen-only Pills have a breakthrough rate of 60-85%. The original large dose Pills made a barrier to sperm by thickening cervical mucus. Foam, condoms, and diaphragms also interpose a physical barrier but other contraceptives merely prevent implantation and therefore, cause early abortions before the woman realizes conception (fertilization) had occurred. Low dose contraceptive pills prevent implantation; they do not "contracept" (prevent fertilization). [National Association of Pro-LIfe Nurses, Spring 1996]   The 1999 Physicians Desk Reference reads: "Progestin-only oral contraceptives prevent conception by suppressing ovulation in approximately half of users, thickening the cervical mucus to inhibit sperm penetration, lowering the midcycle LH and FSH peaks, slowing the movement of the ovum through the fallopian tubes, and altering the endometrium" (p. 2201). "Combination oral contraceptives act by suppression of gonadotropins. Although the primary mechanism of this action is inhibition of ovulation, other alterations include changes in the cervical mucus (which increase the difficulty of sperm entry into the uterus) and the endometrium (which reduce the likelihood...