More Premature Babies Surviving at 23 Weeks, Study Finds

Over the past two decades, doctors have made significant progress in saving the earliest premature babies, according to a report issued Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association. Between 1993 and 2012, the study found a “significant increase in survival” of infants born prematurely at 23, 24, 25 and 27 weeks. Rosemary Higgins, program scientist for the neonatal research network at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, explained in an interview: “Extremely pre-term babies born before the 28th week are now surviving in greater numbers.” Higgins pointed to advances in medical care as a reason for the increased survival rates of premature babies: Increased use of surfactant has offered better protection for the newborns’ lungs, and steroids given to mothers in the hours or days before a pre-term birth promote development of lungs, which normally don’t mature until 34 to 36 weeks of gestation. This is not the first study of its kind. A study released earlier this year by the New England Journal of Medicine found that babies born as early as 22 weeks may survive if they are properly treated. Unfortunately, while science is proving that infants at 23 weeks or even 22 weeks of gestation can survive outside the womb, it is still legal to abort such babies in many states, as they are not considered “viable” (able to survive outside the womb). While new evidence is showing that babies may be viable earlier than 24 weeks, the abortion industry continues to push aside such science in favor of “abortion rights.” Even so, The New York Times reports that viability is...

Press Release: Preterm Birth, a Leading Cause of Long-Term Neurological Disabilities in Children, Can Be Dramatically Reduced by Avoiding Two Procedures

Editor: A stunning increase in preterm delivery — both intended and unintended — has been happening over the past few decades. Preterm delivery can dramatically increase the risk of Cerebral Palsy in the child. There appear to be two procedures that affect this increase. The first reason is elective induced preterm delivery. A normal pregnancy lasts approximately 40 weeks, measured from last menstrual period (LMP). Many women and couples have decided to push delivery of their babies earlier and earlier to accommodate their personal wishes, apparently unaware that the last few weeks, and days, of pregnancy are critical to complete development of many body organs, such as lungs and brain. One major consequence of early preterm delivery can be Cerebral Palsy. Unfortunately, many physicians have ‘gone along’ with these wishes, possibly to the detriment of the babies. Nationally, the “39-Week Initiative” is spreading to encourage hospitals to write policies that ban elective deliveries prior to Week 39. Slowly, the public is learning about the dangers of early, and very early, preterm delivery, and are realizing that allowing the baby to pick its own birth-date is “worth the weight”. The second reason is induced abortion. There are presently well over one hundred peer-reviewed published studies suggesting a strong connection between abortion and unintended preterm delivery/birth of subsequent children. Some of these studies can be found at this website.   Dr. Ellice Lieberman and her Harvard University colleagues reported that Black-American women in Boston with more that one (1) prior abortion nearly double (1.91 times) their risk of premature deliveries. Dr. Lieberman’s study appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine...

Time Magazine’s ‘Preemie Revolution’ Illustrates How These Babies are Surviving and Thriving (2014)

A front cover photo for TIME magazine unintentionally sends as strong a pro-life message as we could ever want: “Saving Preemies: Emalyn was Due in June, She arrived in March.” … Written by Jeffrey Kluger, the home base for the story is the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He writes a realistic but deeply optimistic profile of little David Joyce that explains the how and why of what TIME calls “A Preemie Revolution: Cutting-edge medicine and dedicated caregivers are helping the tiniest babies survive—and thrive.” At the risk of stating the abundantly obvious, the incongruity (to put it mildly) of aborting the same age baby that is tenderly, lovingly cared for by a “SWAT team” of devote specialists is hard to ignore—or understand. Babies whose lives everyone is desperately trying to save could have been—and are—aborted. Bear in mind these little ones are sensitive to pain. … and I want to share some of the amazing information embedded in [the] lengthy and powerful account. Here are four thoughts: #1 “Every decade since the 1960s, the age of viability has been reduced by a week,” Dr. Edward McCabe, medical director of the March of Dimes, tells Kluger. Kluger writes, “In 1960 the survival rate for infants under 1,500 g, or 3.3 lb., was 28%. In 2010 it was 78%, and a lot of that improvement has occurred just since the 1980s.” #2. Kluger writes objectively about the most difficult and challenging cases but adds (as he should), “Thanks to advances not available even a few years ago, the odds of surviving and...