July – April 2009: Embryo-Destructive and Adult Stem Cell Research

Breast Milk Contains Stem Cells Adult Stem Cells Found to Cure Blindness – Three Patients Apparently Cured Destruction of Human Embryos for Stem Cell Research with Tax Dollars Poised to Begin: Comment Period / Comments Requested on Obama's New Human Embryo-Destructive Stem Cell Policy   Scientists in Japan Claim Breakthroughs in Growing Human Organs in Animals Adult Stem Cells from Fat Tissue Offer Hope for MS Treatment Limb-Saving Adult Stem Cell Trial Shows Promise Multiple Route Bone Marrow Stem Cell Injections Help Spinal Cord Patients For Patients Seeking Cures, Adult Stem Cell Research Industry is Blossoming Patients in Wheelchairs Able to Walk Again Because Adult Stem Cells Can Heal Broken Bones Stem Cell Transplantation Helps Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Achieve Long-Term Insulin Independence Adult Stem Cells Used Successfully to Cure Diabetics, Heal Broken Jaw Bone /  Update Spinal Cord Injury Treatments: Adult Stem Cells v. Embyronic Stem Cells / Related Journal Articles Scientists Use Adult Stem Cell Research to Repair Damaged Corneas, Helping Blind to See Stem Cell Research Bytes…  Breast Milk Contains Stem Cells The Perth scientist who made the world-first discovery that human breast milk contains stem cells is confident that within five years scientists will be harvesting them to research treatment for conditions as far-reaching as spinal injuries, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. But what Dr Mark Cregan is excited about right now is the promise that his discovery could be the start of many more exciting revelations about the potency of breast milk. He believes that it not only meets all the nutritional needs of a growing infant but contains key markers that guide his...

Dramatic Treatments Using Adult & Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells – Bibliography

www.ClinicalTrials.gov – Amazing list of over 250 grants through NIH; at least half deal with non-embryonic stem cell research. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/search?term=%22stem+cells%22&submit=Search With patient’s own cells, heart vessels and tissue show mending http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/metropolitan/3277225 Check the Score  http://stemcellresearch.org/ Diseases Treated Now with Cord Blood Stem Cells http://www.viacord.com/what_diseases_treated.htm Why Cord Blood is the Premier Source of Stem Cellshttp://www.viacord.com/what_why_premier_source.htm   Adult & Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Research Breakthroughs, Treatments and Cures as of 4/05 Spinal Cord Injuries – olfactory glial cells from the lining of the patient’s nose (1,2) or from umbilical cord stem cells (3) Skull Bone Repair – girl’s own bone and adult stem cells to repair 19 sq in. of her skull (4) Liver Repair – adult stem cells (5) Heart Muscle Regeneration – adult stem cells (6, 7, 8, 9) Blindness/Sight Regained – adult stem cell transplants (10) Crohn’s Disease – adult stem cells from patients’ own blood (11) Systemic Lupus – 90% of 19 patients with autoimmune disorders, such as lupus, are in remissionor have improved after treatment with their own blood stem cells (12) Multiple Sclerosis – one patient improved after treatment with his own adult blood stem cells (13) Parkinson’s – average improvement of 61% increase of coordination and fewer symptoms after transplants of the patient’s own neuronal stem cells (14) Leukemia – 14 of 18 patients freed of the disease; stem cells from umbilical cord blood (15) Sickle Cell Anemia – “Hematopoietic adult stem cells successfully treated over 200 patients. The success rate has been 80-85%.” (16) Rheumatoid Arthritis – patient free of the disease one year after treatment with her sister’s adult stem cells....

May 2005: Stem Cell Research

Dramatic Uses for Adult Stem Cells – Bibliography Adult Stem Cells to be Tested in Repairing Human Heart Muscle For the first time, scientists will be able to see whether injections of bone marrow stem cells can actually help rebuild weakened human heart muscle. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center will inject the cells into five to 10 heart-failure patients when the patients are implanted with a left ventricular assist device, a heart pump meant to sustain them until they can receive a heart transplant. The stem cells will be obtained from each patient’s own bone marrow… Lead investigator Dr. Amit Patel, director of cardiac cell therapy centers at UPMC and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, said no other researchers have received approval from the FDA to use stem cells this way. According to co-investigator Dr. Robert Kormos, medical director of the McGowan Institute, the purpose of the new trial is to put stem cells into areas of damaged cardiac tissue and then, when the heart is removed to be replaced with a donor organ, see what they did. The diseased heart will be removed when a donor organ is available for transplant, perhaps six to nine months later, so the researchers will be able to see the impact of the injected cells. “No one has ever done this in the world,” Kormos said. In a study conducted in South America, he added, Patel “has already shown the hearts improved, but it’s hard to understand why.” In January, Patel presented findings from a South American multicenter study in which bone marrow-derived stem cells were injected into...

Treatment Combination Helps Paralyzed Rats to Walk (5/04)

In a major step forward in research on spinal cord injuries, scientists in Miami reported in May that an innovative combination of treatments allowed paralyzed rats to regain up to 70% of their ability to walk. The research is a “significant advance” that may help some of the 243,000Americans with spinal cord injuries get out of their wheelchairs. Researchers at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis say they have found a way to promote the growth of nerve fibers in damaged spinal cords and prevent post-injury nerve death. A spinal cord injury damages the nerve circuits that carry messages from the brain to the body.Recent research has focused on transplanting cells [adult stem cells] from peripheral nerves outside the brain and spinal cord into the damaged area as a bridge across the injury. But new nerve fibers didn’t go beyond the bridge because of problems such as growth-inhibiting molecules, researcher Mary Bartlett Bunge says. Bunge, along with Damien Pearse, lead author of the study published in Nature Medicine, and colleagues, devised a three-part approach that begins shortly after the injury occurs. The research did not involve the politically sensitive issue of [embryonic] stem cells, but used cells from adult rats [adult stem cells]. Researchers first inject the rats with Rolipram, a drug that stops the loss of a growth-enhancing chemical called cyclic AMP, which occurs just after a spinal cord injury. Researchers then take cells from the rats’ peripheral nerves, grow those in the lab and transplant them into the injured area, followed by one-time injections of cyclic AMP above and below the transplant site. The injections raise the...