The Pill Kills Again: Tragedy Strikes as 21-year-old Dies after 25 Days on The Pill (2015)

She died after 25 days on the pill. She was only 21. As in so many blood clot cases caused by birth control, she was misdiagnosed when she went to the hospital struggling to breathe and experiencing pain in her legs and ribs. She was sent home diagnosed with a bruised sternum. Four days later, she collapsed and was rushed to the hospital. On May 14, three days after arriving at the hospital, she was pronounced dead. According to an article in Cosmopolitan, tests revealed a large blood clot on her lung. Her name was Fallan Kurek, and she worked with disabled children in Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia. She had started taking the pill—a combination oral contraceptive—to regulate her menstrual cycle. Why wasn’t Fallan warned about the possibility of blood clots that accompany pill use? Why did the hospital not immediately connect her symptoms to the contraceptive she had just started taking? Fallan’s devastated mother was quoted in the Birmingham Mail, “She was only on it to regulate her periods. I couldn’t believe nobody had said the pill could do this. It should say it on the pack that they can kill and the label.” Annually, one in every 3000 women taking birth control pills will develop blood clots. It is well known all across the medical community that the pill increases the risk for deadly blood clots. And that information is indeed printed on the very lengthy packet insert, which most women never read. But it is not displayed on the packet, the label, or any other prominent place. And even knowing of the possibility of blood...

Avoidable Deaths from Heart Disease, Stroke, and Hypertensive Disease — United States, 2001–2010

CDC, MMWR, September 6, 2013 / 62(35);721-727 (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr). Abstract Background: Deaths attributed to lack of preventive health care or timely and effective medical care can be considered avoidable. In this report, avoidable causes of death are either preventable, as in preventing cardiovascular events by addressing risk factors, or treatable, as in treating conditions once they have occurred. Although various definitions for avoidable deaths exist, studies have consistently demonstrated high rates in the United States. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of U.S. deaths (approximately 800,000 per year) and many of them (e.g., heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive deaths among persons aged <75 years) are potentially avoidable. Methods: National Vital Statistics System mortality data for the period 2001–2010 were analyzed. Avoidable deaths were defined as those resulting from an underlying cause of heart disease (ischemic or chronic rheumatic), stroke, or hypertensive disease in decedents aged <75 years. Rates and trends by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and place were calculated. Results: In 2010, an estimated 200,070 avoidable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive disease occurred in the United States, 56% of which occurred among persons aged <65 years. The overall age-standardized death rate was 60.7 per 100,000. Rates were highest in the 65–74 years age group, among males, among non-Hispanic blacks, and in the South. During 2001–2010, the overall rate declined 29%, and rates of decline varied by age. Conclusions: Nearly one fourth of all cardiovascular disease deaths are avoidable. These deaths disproportionately occurred among non-Hispanic blacks and residents of the South. Persons aged <65 years had lower rates than those aged 65–74 years but still accounted for a considerable share...

July – April 2011: Stem Cell Research

  FIND PAST HOMEPAGE TOPICS UNDER "CURRENT HEADLINES" IN THE LEFT MENU…   NEW! Adult Stem Cells Helping Patients With Scleroderma Skin Disease NEW! Adult Stem Cell Trial in Texas Will Treat Stroke Patients Adult Stem Cell Success: Cells Relieve Heart Pain in Patients Adult Stem Cells Help Create New Windpipe, Save Cancer Patient Scientists Grow Human Heart in Lab Using Adult Stem Cells Early Trial Shows Adult Stem Cells Healing Hearts SKIN: National Geographic Program Shows Skin Gun Sprays Healing Adult Stem Cells Girl Cured of Brain Cancer Using Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Success: Human Neurons From Adult Skin Cells Good News and Bad News for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Immediate Success: Adult Stem Cells are Treating Thousands of Patients Now Ethical Stem Cell Research… Adult Stem Cells Helping Patients With Scleroderma Skin Disease Dr. Richard Burt and colleagues at Northwestern University have just published a new study in The Lancet that provides more evidence for the success of adult stem cell transplant in treating system sclerosis (scleroderma). The autoimmune disease causes rigidity in the skin and organs, including lungs, of its victims; it exerts its fatal influence by essentially turning them to stone. Ten patients were treated with their own adult stem cells, and all improved at or before 12 months after treatment, compared with zero of the nine patients that received cyclophosphamide, a chemotherapeutic agent considered the “standard of care” for this disease. None of the adult stem cell-treated patients had their disease worsen, while 8 of the 9 chemo-treated patients showed worsening, and eventually 7 of the chemo patients switched to the adult stem cell...

Diabetes Cases May Double, or Triple, by 2050

Perhaps 1 in 3 will have the disease. Obesity plays an increasing role in this situation. According to the report, one in 10 U.S. adults have diabetes now, and the prevalence is expected to rise sharply over the next 40 years, primarily type 2 diabetes, according to a report published in Population Health Metrics. Diabetes is the Number One reason for adult blindness, kidney failure, and limb amputation, and is closely linked to heart attacks and strokes, and to a form of dementia. The CDC estimates the current cost of diabetes at $174 Billion annually — $116 Billion of which is in direct medical costs. [22 Oct 2010, USA TODAY, McLean, VA, Mary Brophy...

Second Prempro HRT Study Shows Link to Cancer Risks

[NOTE: Keep in mind that HRT — Hormone Replacement Therapy — uses the same artificial hormones that are used in chemical birth control methods.] Prempro is a “drug that relieves hot flashes but raises the risk of the two biggest cancer killers in women” according to Rowan Chlebowski, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. Prempro is a combination of the hormones estrogen and progestin used by 15% to 20% of post-menopausal women in the USA. Chlebowski et al reported in JAMA (Oct 2010) that, compared with a placebo, Prempro increased women’s risk of breast cancer, that their cancers were more likely to have spread to their lymph nodes, and that they were more likely to die of breast cancer. These findings come from a government-sponsored study known as the Women’s Health Initiative. One part of the study randomly assigned 16,000 women, aged 50-79, to either Prempro or a placebo. That study was halted in July 2002 because long-term Prempro use was found to raise the risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke. Participants had been taking their pills for an average of 5.5 years. These findings join a growing list of studies questioning the safety of hormone therapy. Last year, the same researchers reported in The Lancet that, compared with a placebo, Prempro raises the number of lung cancer deaths, although it does not increase the number of lung cancer cases. In February 2009, Chlebowski et al reported that Prempro users had a marked decrease in breast cancer risk within two years of quitting treatment. In this second Prempro study just released, researchers followed about 13,000 women for an...