Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis, an infection caused by a protozoan organism called Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), is one of the most commonly occurring sexually transmitted infections (STI/STD) in the world. There are more than 200 million new cases of trichomoniasis around the world each year.1 Of these, about 5 million new infections occur in the United States each year 2 —more cases then are attributed to either chlamydia or herpes in a year. TV affects about a fifth of all women in their reproductive years.3 It is most prevalent in African American women—as many as one quarter to one half have TV. TV has been found in 3% of college students attending a student health clinic and in 37% of commercial sex workers.4 TV rates in men at STD clinics range from 3 – 17%.5 TV causes about a fifth (20%) of the cases of nongonococcal urethritis (inflammation of urethra not caused by gonorrhea) in men.6 What Happens if I get TV? 50-75% of persons with TV have no symptoms.1   In men, inflammation of the urethra or mild discharge may occur, although most men with TV (85%) have no symptoms at all.1,2  Only one-fifth to one-half of infected women have symptoms. Typically there is a yellow-green vaginal discharge.  Red spots—visible in only few cases (10%)—are called “strawberry spots” or colpitis macularis and are highly specific for TV.3 In addition to the discharge, the infection may cause irritation, an unpleasant odor, and serious consequences if not treated. Abdominal pain may also occur in 12% of women due to severe vaginitis. References: 1.1. Sorvillo F, Smith L, Krendt P, Ash L, et al. Trichomonas...