Study: Abortion Poses Mental Health Concerns for Young Women Over the Years

Abortion during the late teen and early adult years raises a woman’s risk of mental health problems and may be linked to almost one in ten cases of these women’s mental disorders, a new study says. A sociologist at CUA found that the risks of a mental disorder with abortion far exceeded the risks from involuntary loss of pregnancy. “Evidence from the United States confirms previous findings from Norway and New Zealand that, unlike other pregnancy outcomes, abortion is consistently associated with a moderate increase in risk of mental health disorders during late adolescence and early adulthood,” said the study’s abstract. The study, conducted by sociology professor Donald Paul Sullins of CUA, was published July 22, 2016 in the peer-reviewed Sage Open Medicine journal — http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2813546 After adjusting for demographic differences and other factors, the study found that abortion during these years elevated a woman’s risk of mental health disorder by 45%. “One-eleventh of the prevalence of mental disorders examined over the period were attributable to abortion,” the study’s abstract said. The study sought to examine any links between pregnancy outcomes like birth, abortion or miscarriage and mental health outcomes for U.S. women during the transition to adulthood. It drew on a national study of 8,005 women that surveyed them three times at average ages of 15, 22 and 28. Involuntary pregnancy loss was associated with a 24% elevated risk of mental disorder, while childbirth was “weakly associated” with reduced risk of mental disorder. Students for Life of America said the study showed the need for better data about the risks of abortion. “Abortion activists have repeatedly denounced attempts...

CDC QuickStats: Birth Rates Among Females Aged 15–19 Years, by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1991 and 2014

The figure is a bar chart showing that from 1991 to 2014, the birth rate for females aged 15-19 years declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded for the United States. Declines ranged from 60% for non-Hispanic white teens to 72% for Asian or Pacific Islander teens. Despite the declines among all groups, teen birth rates by race/ethnicity continued to reflect wide disparities. In 1991, rates ranged from 27.3 per 1,000 for Asian or Pacific Islanders to 118.2 for non-Hispanic blacks; in 2014, rates ranged from 7.7 for Asian or Pacific Islanders to 38.0 for Hispanics. From 1991 to 2014, the birth rate for females aged 15–19 years declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded for the United States. Declines ranged from 60% for non-Hispanic white teens to 72% for Asian or Pacific Islander teens. Despite the declines among all groups, teen birth rates by race/ethnicity continued to reflect wide disparities. In 1991, rates ranged from 27.3 per 1,000 for Asian or Pacific Islanders to 118.2 for non-Hispanic blacks; in 2014, rates ranged from 7.7 for Asian or Pacific Islanders to 38.0 for Hispanics. [CDC MMWR Weekly, January 1, 2016 / 6 (50);1388; http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6450a6.htm?s_cid=mm6450a6_e ; Source: Hamilton BE, Martin JA, Osterman MJ, et al. Births: final data for 2014. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2015;65(12). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_12.pdf Adobe PDF file. Reported by: T.J. Mathews, MS; Brady E. Hamilton,...

College Sports Related Injuries — United States, 2009–10 Through 2013–14 Academic Years

Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013–14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009–10 through 2013–14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete’s participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men’s football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men’s wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women’s sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men’s ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring =7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice… Visit link...

Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol, Marijuana, and Alcohol and Marijuana Combined Among Persons Aged 16–25 Years — United States, 2002–2014

Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death among youths and young adults aged 16–25 years in the United States (1). The prevalence of drinking and driving among high school students aged 16–19 years has declined by 54%, from 22.3% in 1991 to 10.3% in 2011 (2). However, the prevalence of weekend nighttime driving under the influence of marijuana (based on biochemical assays) among drivers aged =16 years has increased by 48%, from 8.6% in 2007 to 12.6% in 2013–2014 (3). Use of marijuana alone and in combination with alcohol has been shown to impair driving abilities (4–9). This report provides the most recent self-reported national estimates of driving under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and alcohol and marijuana combined among persons aged 16–25 years, using data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) from 2002–2014. Prevalence data on driving under the influence of both substances were examined for two age groups (16–20 years and 21–25 years) and by sex and race/ethnicity. During 2002–2014, the prevalence of driving under the influence of alcohol alone significantly declined by 59% among persons aged 16–20 years (from 16.2% in 2002 to 6.6% in 2014; p<0.001) and 38% among persons 21–25 years (from 29.1% in 2002 to 18.1% in 2014; p<0.001). In addition, the prevalence of driving under the influence of alcohol and marijuana combined significantly declined by 39%, from 2.3% in 2002 to 1.4% in 2014 (p<0.001) among persons aged 16–20 years and from 3.1% in 2002 to 1.9% in 2014 (p<0.001) among persons aged 21–25 years. The prevalence of...

Abortion Surveillance — United States, 2012

Since 1969, CDC has conducted abortion surveillance to document the number and characteristics of women obtaining legal induced abortions in the United States. Each year, CDC requests abortion data from the central health agencies of 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and New York City). The reporting areas provide this information voluntarily. For 2012, data were received from 49 reporting areas. A total of 699,202 abortions were reported to CDC for 2012. Of these abortions, 98.4% were from the 47 reporting areas that provided data every year during 2003–2012. MMWR Surveillance Summaries MMWR Surveill Summ 2015;64(No. SS-10), Karen Pazol, PhD; Andreea A. Creanga, MD, PhD; Denise J. Jamieson, MD Vol. 64, No. SS-10 November 27, 2015 [November 25, 2015, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss6410a1.htm?s_cid=ss6410a1_e ] ——————————————————————————– US: CDC Reports Sharp Decline in Abortions Reports from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) show a dramatic decline in abortions across the US. In November, the CDC reported there were 699,202 abortions in 2012, down from 1.5 million in the late 1980s, and a December report showed the abortion rate declined by over one-third between 1990 and 2010. Pro-life leaders welcomed the news, attributing the decline to an increase in laws that protect life as well as a cultural shift away from abortion. 231 new pro-life laws were enacted between 2010 and 2014. [Ed. California, which historically recorded ~250,000 abortions per year, and two other states, have not reported abortions to CDC for several years.] [from 2015: 47 New Pro-Life Laws Enacted in US; PNCI Global News_Dec 22, 2015] ——————————————————————————– 2012 USA Abortion Surveillance released 25...