New Laws on Abortion in Europe Viewed as Threatening Abortion Access

International Pro-Abortion Actions The Center for Reproductive Rights (CRR) in a new fact sheet– Mandatory Waiting Periods and Biased Counseling Requirements in Central and Eastern Europe; Restricting access to abortion, undermining human rights, and reinforcing harmful gender stereotypes— declares that recently enacted laws on abortion in central and eastern Europe are harmful to women’s health and well-being. New requirements in Russia, Macedonia, and Slovakia for waiting periods, mandatory counseling, and informed consent are labeled “retrogressive measures” which the CRR denounces. The CRR acknowledges that countries seeking to restrict abortion have had a very long history of unlimited abortion on demand but fails to question why governments are now issuing new requirements on abortion. It declares, “Many Central and Eastern European countries were among the first jurisdictions in the world to legalize abortion. Indeed laws and policies in most Central and Eastern European countries have long provided that women may access abortion services in a wide range of circumstances… However, in recent years, a wave of restrictive legislative initiatives has spread across Central and Eastern European jurisdictions, with lawmakers and government authorities seeking to impose a series of new preconditions that women must fulfill before they can obtain legal abortion services.” The new laws are called “barriers in access to legal abortion services” that “undermine respect for women’s human rights, and promote harmful gender stereotypes and discriminatory attitudes.” Opposition to abortion regulations is couched in human rights language with references to UN treaty monitoring body recommendations that also distort internationally recognized human rights law to advance access to abortion. The CRR charges that “the retrogressive introduction of these laws and...

UN CEDAW Objects to Russian Measures for Counseling Women Prior to Abortion

CEDAW objected to Russia’s recent measures to provide counseling to women before they resort to abortion and to mandatory waiting periods. CEDAW referred to the policy measures as “barriers to access to safe abortion services” and called for their removal. The policy measures were designed to reduce the abortion rate and were successful. The Russian Federation explained how in the period of 2010-2014 the total number of abortions dropped by 24.1 per cent (to 881,400 in 2013 from 1,161,700 in 2009) and the number of abortions per 1,000 women of fertile age declined to 24.5 in 2013 from 30.5 in 2009 (a decrease of 19.7 percent). There was a 33.8% reduction in abortion among women with their first pregnancy; 27.4% reduction for abortion for unspecified reasons; 84.6% reduction for criminal abortions. According to the report, the reduction in the number of abortions was the result of “systematic work done to prevent them” which included an increase in the number of “women’s counseling centres with medical and social assistance offices” to 856 in 2014 from 419 in 2011. 150,000 women were helped at the centers in 2014. [November 2015, PNCI Monthly Newsletter, www.pncius.org...

Worldwide, Only China and Russia Do More Abortions Every Year Than International Planned Parenthood

View Charts at http://www.lifenews.com/2015/08/05/worldwide-only-china-and-russia-do-more-abortions-every-year-than-planned-parenthood/ The Charlotte Lozier Institute, the education and research arm of Susan B. Anthony List, published a report that reveals that China is the only country in the world that has a higher abortion rate than the United States. The Institute also reports that “if Planned Parenthood were included for comparison, it would rank sixth in the world in number of abortions carried out annually; and the International Planned Parenthood Federation would be fourth in the number of abortions carried out per year.” Unfortunately, this information is not surprising because federal funding of Planned Parenthood has jumped from 33% to nearly 50% under the Obama administration, with over half a billion dollars coming from taxpayer money. Here’s the breakdown of annual abortions by country and abortion provider: China 9,173,100 United States 1,213,000 Russian Federation 1,208,700 International PP Federation 977,189 India 641,800 Vietnam 332,200 PP USA 327,653 Japan 242,300 France 198,200 England and Wales 189,800 Turkey 177,100 Azerbaijan 159,700 It is discouraging that our abortion rate is second to China’s— a nation that is known for their brutal one-child policy and human rights abuses. In China, men put pressure on women to abort their girls for boys; husbands often threaten divorce as punishment for their wives if they refuse to abort; and friends and family belittle their pregnant loved ones for wanting to keep their babies. The United States is similar to China in that we too perform extremely late abortions. In fact, we are one of only four nations in the world (with China, North Korea and Canada) that performs abortions for any reason up until...

Top 10 International Victories

During the summer of 2010, I felt called to lead a 40 Days for Life campaign in England. I was nervous, apprehensive and sceptical. Several years later, thanks to stepping out in faith, many hundreds of babies have been saved from abortion. 40 Days for Life has now been tried and tested in 30 countries around the world with a clear and proven track record of saving lives from abortion. The inspiring testimonies of 40 Days for Life and its rapid growth around the world should make you ask yourself a question: what would happen in your community if someone started a campaign there? If lives can be saved in all these communities, it can happen where YOU live. Here are 10 top victories around the world: 10. London – Abortion centre closes The Bedford Square BPAS closed its doors for good in 2014, following 3,000 hours of prayer and five 40 Days for Life campaigns. Many women who were scheduled for an abortion chose life for their babies over three years of campaigns in central London. One abortion worker remarked, “Your prayers are obviously working, because the girls aren’t keeping the appointments.” Each campaign, between 6-10 women who were scheduled for an abortion would choose life for their child. 9. Croatia – From one campaign to 17 40 Days for Life has been a huge success in Croatia. Ante Caljkusic first brought the campaign to Zagreb last year. Since his leap of faith, 40 Days for Life spread to 17 cities the next campaign, inspiring neighbouring countries to join the campaign as well! The campaign has been touching...

Never Say ‘Die’

Even as Population Growth Dramatically Slows, the United Nations Keeps Hyping ‘World Population Day’ On July 11th, the United Nations will celebrate its 26th World Population Day. The point of this annual exercise is to raise money to promote abortion, sterilization and contraception among poor and vulnerable women by alarming us about the dangers of global population growth. The problem with this narrative is that, in many regions of the world, the population is declining, not growing. About half the world’s population lives in “low-fertility” countries, where women have fewer than 2.1 children on average over their lifetimes. Low-fertility countries now include all of Europe (except Iceland), the Americas (17 countries), and most of Asia (19 countries). The list of low-fertility countries include China, the United States, Brazil, the Russian Federation, Japan and Viet Nam. In other words, growth rates have dramatically declined from the late 1960s when the global population grew at a rate of 2.1% each year. That rate is now about 1% a year. The UN’s low variant projection (historically the most accurate) indicates that it will peak at around 8.3 billion in 2050. Even the medium variant projection shows population growth slowing to 0.1% by the century’s end, and turning negative beyond 2100. In either case, the population of the world will never double again. As these numbers suggest, fertility rates have dipped to all-time lows. The U.N.’s medium variant projection estimates that women are now averaging 2.45 children over their reproductive lifetime, while the low variant pegs this at only 2.05. The global average was 4.97 just 60 years ago. Under either variant, this...